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BSA Chainsaw Safety training...

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  • BSA Chainsaw Safety training...

    Looks like a good, basic course. Seen too many times, volunteers showing up on precamp work days with just out of the box saws, having little to no experience in their use. This course should help the newbees in getting a good start, and staying safe.
    Yes, there are a few weak areas in the course, but an experience trainer should catch these, and cover it in the training session.
    What is not covered, is working at heights, the domain of the trained arborist which is a very good thing. Better to keep folks on the ground (recall a number of years ago the needless death of a new hire Ranger, working alone, who pinned his self in a crotched tree).
    Even though I've considerable experience with chain saws, when this course is offered in my neck of the woods, I plan to attend. Who knows, maybe this old dog will pick up a few new tricks....

  • #2
    I was told effective 1 january 2010 you will need the course, so it should have been offered already. I have limited experience and plan on taking it when I can, the course my council offered conflicted with the council CS event I was working.

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    • #3
      This is an example of a course I'd like to take. I've never had need to use a chainsaw but I'd like to get the instruction so I have options. Again though, I see the dreaded "need to have" phrase. So is this yet another mandatory course even if said individual (unlike me) has 20+ years of experience using a chainsaw?

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      • #4
        Yes, it looks like another manditory course. But, unlike other BSA courses (Climb on Safety, Safety Afloat, etc...), this one is the rare exception in that it has obviously been laid out by experts. Provided that the Council trainers are equally experience, this will be training worth the time, effort, and expense to take.

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        • #5
          Yep I hate the mandatory courses and wish a skills 'challenge" option was in effect similar to AHA's basic life support: i.e. take written test, then if you pass that go onto skills tests, if you pas both, you are recertified.

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          • #6
            Having given this soon to be here training program a bit more thought, I see for the now only those experienced with chainsaws being the first to take this course. The reason will be cost. I doubt Councils, let alone their Rangers will allow the use of these tools for training due to liability concerns, and replacement costs.
            For those without the gear, just to acquire the basics will see an outlay of around 300 to 500 dollars, and in this tight economy that's a considerable amount of cold water to be hit with.
            Overall, I don't see that many signing up for the course....


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            • #7
              Agree. I don't own chaps. I put my money into buying a better, safer chainsaw for my weekend woodlot management. Maybe some day I will have the money for chaps, until then council can go hire the pros.

              There seems to be this attitude coming from the BSA - "We want you to volunteer your expertise and experience, BUT we want you to meet our new conditions by taking (i.e. you pay) these courses we offer, particularly the ones conveniently offered at the Philmont Training Center. Heh, bring the family." No surprise, that this turns off many able and willing adult volunteers. Maybe they expected to be treated like adults?

              That said it sounds like it could be a good course with the right teacher. And yes I wished I owned chaps but I will continue to cut anyway.
              (This message has been edited by RememberSchiff)

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              • #8
                le V -- where are you looking at the course? Is it online somewhere?

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                • #9
                  Information for the course can be found here....

                  http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/BoyScouts/TrainingModules.aspx

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                  • #10
                    Seem like a fairly reasonable course. I can see our Ranger teaching it in a few hours during Beaver days. I don't see where there would be a huge expense for anyone. I don't own chaps and don't use them. I know our camps have them and would make them available to anyone needing them at camp.

                    Personally, I'd like to see a little more guidance in the course as to what to walk away from. I've helped maintain our family's timber farm for 30 years and there are more trees I WON"T fell than there are trees I'm willing to cut. I don't do this kind of work often enough to have the experience to take on the tricky stuff.

                    If it's on my insurance policy, I'd limit volunteers to cutting down wood or trees less that 6-inch dia. without the specific approval and/or supervision of the ranger. The same jackass that buys a saw at Home Depot and thinks he can run it is the same guy who takes this class and thinks he can drop a two-foot tree next to the dining hall in a windstorm.

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