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Couple O/A questions

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  • Couple O/A questions

    I was tapped out in 1978 and subsequently marched out into the woods. I participated with other O/A candidates in several weekends of work at Camp Seminole in S. Florida in 1979. By June 1980 I went into the military. I went back into scouting in 92 for a while as an Asst. Scoutmaster, but O/A wasn't a big deal with that troop so I didn't really get into it again. I recently returned to scouting again. Now, from what I am reading O/A has changed dramatically. Change doesn't really matter to me one way or another. But, I am grateful for my experiences, especially my solo challenge. You just never know how that type of thing pays off until you really are alone in the middle of nowhere. It was a more personal experience that was very beneficial to me. It was an honor to be tapped out because as a Boy Scout, my troop did not elect members very often.

    I guess my question is am I allowed back? I know this is a "boy led" program, but is reentry or adult participation possible? Or is it necessary to be voted or asked back? No pocket flap for me? Even my one old one?

  • #2
    You and your dues money will both be very welcome. Contact your council ---usually there will be an application you can use to rejoin.

    Check to see if your district has a functioning OA chapter. If so, you will probably be very welcome if you show up at one of their meetings interested in helping with chapter activities.

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    • #3
      You can wear any flap you wish, unless your unit does uniform inspections or the uniform police spot you.
      But you should really wear the flap of the lodge you are currently affiliated with. It's tough to mix in with a new lodge sporting another one.

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      • #4
        The ties of Brotherhood are lasting,and you will be welcome. Just pay your dues and be active.

        As for lodge flaps, that depends on how your lodge does things. Some lodges allow them to be purchased at the scout office, others only at lodge events. And some lodges have restrictions on their flaps, i.e. 1 per lifetime, one for X number of hours doing cheerful service, one per OA event, etc.

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        • #5
          Welcome back. Wear the flap of the lodge in which you're active and registered.
          BDPT00

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          • #6
            George Az,

            My answer. It is kinda similar to other Fraternities. You are an Arrowman. The real question is, are you an active dues paying member, or a former (no longer active) member. Most of the time, the chapter chief, lodge chief and advisor(s), will desire some written proof or descriptive proof that you were once a member.

            Bringing former members back as they become Scouting parents is becoming fairly common.

            Scouting Forever and Venture On!
            Crew21_Adv

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            • #7
              Well, there is another question. Formal written proof. My mother, now past, saved my scount handbook,all my merit badge cards, promotion record book and many patches including 2 pocket flaps (one being a special anniversary patch). I might have a camp roster or something else with some names. I am trying to remember things 30 years ago. I am not lying, maybe I could find my old scoutmaster? Or someone from the lodge kept written records? The digital age is pretty good for some things - communication like this for one.

              My next step would be to contact the original lodge? Hey remember me?

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              • #8
                Ask the lodge's membership secretary what requirements they want to let you join. This kind of dilemma comes up constantly, every lodge deals with it. Although admittedly it's daggone near impossible to get any kind of written verification from a lodge membership 20+ years ago, you can still try, you never know.
                In absence of that, any old membership cards or letters from an old lodge brother would definitely help.

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                • #9
                  Depending upon how involved you were as a youth, and whether your lodge has a history could make a difference in verifying your status.

                  For some things, it's easy to verify if the lodge posts stuff on the 'net. my old lodge has lists for lodge officers, Vigils, Honor Neckerchief, and other awards, so if you got one of those, it's easy. Some lodges have an online history, and you may be found in a pic online. I found a pic of our current SE when he was a youth member of the lodge back in the day online. So the internet route may help.

                  OA handbook form the time with records may help, but it is also possible to forge.

                  Also some lodges may ask you a series of questions. But again those can also be faked. had that happen in my current lodge with someone faking.

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                  • #10
                    I'd start by contacting your local lodge. If you were an ordeal or brotherhood member, the process should be pretty painless. They'll likely work with you to verify your membership as a youth and you may get asked a few questions. Most lodges have some sort of transfer of membership paperwork or reactivation paperwork...you pay your dues, get your new flap and you're good to go. You may be able to make the process easier by calling your original lodge to see if you can get soem membership data/information from them.

                    Now, if you were a Vigil member, my experience is that most lodges will want to see a copy of your Vigil Certificate or some other proof/documentation. As an upside, National keeps a record of all Vigil Honor members. This makes it easy, although a rather lengthy, process to verify inactive Vigil members without paperwork.

                    Welcome back! The order always needs Advisers to mentor and coach the youth in the lodge.

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