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  • #61
    Originally posted by dfscott View Post


    I'd add "or the SM" that. We had an SPL who was a big fan of the "party tents." After dinner, the boys would adjourn to the big tents and the conversations would turn to what typical 15-16 year old boys talk about (girls), which caused the younger boys to get uncomfortable. The result was younger boys sleeping on the ground near the campfire while the older boys stayed up in the big tent.

    When I discussed this issue with the SPL, his response was, "I guess they're just too young to be in scouts" (!!) After several minutes of talking in circles, I finally just said "no big tents" and left it at that.
    The issue isn't big tents. Missed opportunity to teach your SPL what taking care of people is all about. Looks like the kind of leadership that basically takes care of oneself and one's buddies. Definitely not the kind of leadership taught in BSA. Scout Oath: ....to help other people at all times...... Obviously this SPL hasn't a clue as to what that means. I'd pull his POR before I changed the rules on tents. That basically lets the SPL off the hook... That would have been a SMC right then and there with that scout.

    Stosh

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    • #62
      That is a bit much, nevermind the fact that it is totally nonsensical.

      "In the event that the scout or leader chooses to utilize a troop owned tent. The person who checks out the tent with the Quartermaster, will be required to return it to the quartermaster clean, dry, and properly folded. Any damage will be reported to the quartermaster so the tent can be repaired or replaced as needed."

      Sounds great, but then it is stated, "Troop XXXX does not guarantee that troop owned tents are waterproof."

      You can't have it both ways. Either the Quartermaster and the Troop leadership will guarantee the suitability of the tent, or they won't.


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      • #63
        A watch may or may not be waterproof. I have never met a waterproof tent.

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        • #64
          At least not one the Scouts could BREATHE in!

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          • #65
            Most tents properly setup and prepped can with stand MOST downpours.


            I do waterproof mine once a year, yet to get wet while camping. At least not INSIDE the tent

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            • #66
              Originally posted by JasonG172 View Post
              Most tents properly setup and prepped can with stand MOST downpours.
              I do waterproof mine once a year, yet to get wet while camping. At least not INSIDE the tent
              This is the key! Most boys don't select a site properly, nor do they set up their tent correctly. I do believe it's one of the TF->FC requirements, but when one is pencil whipping the requirements, it often gets missed.

              Stosh

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              • #67
                Like I said, we had nearly all of our tents collapse and those that stayed up were because people stood up inside and held them up. It was an unusual storm...

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by evilleramsfan View Post
                  Like I said, we had nearly all of our tents collapse and those that stayed up were because people stood up inside and held them up. It was an unusual storm...
                  Been there done that. Makes for a long night.... Of course it was my Web II outing. Boys went into Boy Scouts with bragging rights already under their belt.

                  Stosh

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                  • #69
                    I need to invent the backcountry positive pressure tent. Waterproof and collapse proof.

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                    • #70
                      Originally posted by King Ding Dong View Post
                      I need to invent the backcountry positive pressure tent. Waterproof and collapse proof.
                      a bounce house?

                      Stosh

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by jblake47 View Post
                        a bounce house?
                        Sort of but you would need to be in the pressure chamber to ensure you stayed dry. Now onto a cheap, lightweight energy source that lasts for days. Then I make trillions.

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                        • #72
                          I never had a Baker Tent Collapse and never got Wet or Snowed during a Storm....and they stayed warm also.. And Stayed cool in the Summer with the Sides rolled up...well as cool as you could be outside in 100+ heat during the Summer months.

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                          • #73

                            What are you attempting to accomplish? I know you answered this, but ask yourself again. Decide what's unnecessary, what's overly wordy, and what doesn't accomplish your purpose, and remove them. This policy is overly complex.

                            Each troop is different, but, remember the patrol method is the core of scouting. My suggestion, each patrol checks out gear, and is only given enough tents to accommodate the members attending the event. Simply moving to patrol camping, along with checking in and out the tents with the quartermaster should cover everything you want to accomplish.

                            Here's some other suggestions. Camp all adults within sight and hearing of the patrols, but not along side them. Stop using personal tents, everyone gets exactly the same equipment. These small changes will vastly improve your scouts camping, and scouting, experience.

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                            • #74
                              Originally posted by King Ding Dong View Post
                              A watch may or may not be waterproof.

                              Actually, no watch can be guaranteed waterproof, and the terminology is no longer legally used in the U.S. and most other countries. It is pressure tested only, and is resistent to that depth as long as all the seals are in good condition and no cracks in the crystal. Years ago, about 1973, I was a trainee for Zales in Riverside, the county with the Salton Sea in it. We had a customer return a watch because he said it leaked while he was fishing on the Salton Sea. But the watch only had the mimimum pressure test of 3 atm, and the Salton Sea is well below sea level. So, it leaked. We did refund it, but explained he needed a better tested watch should he plan on going there again.

                              While in the industry, had number of times where people could not understand why their watch leaked when they pulled a stem under water, or pushed buttons that were not meant to be used under water. Also had instances of condensation when people left them on dashes or hot seats.

                              Interesting to me, but probably too much useless info.

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Patrol method? Why would patrols check out equipment? Shouldn't the patrol boxes belong to the patrols? Same for tents and other equipment. Let the patrols live with their abuse and/or care of the equipment assigned to the patrol. If all I needed to do is turn in a bad tent and figure I'd be lucky to get a different tent next time, I won't worry about the poor sap who gets stuck with a tent that the zipper doesn't work.

                                Stosh

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