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Mr. Boyce

Why are you Adults Doing This?

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Why did I start? Because my daughter's Troop needed a Cookie Mom. I thought, how hard can this really be! Then the Troop needed a leader. Then my co-leader's older Troop needed help. Then the Service Unit needed help. Then I watched all of "my" girls receive their Girl Scout Gold Award and go off to college as Lifetime Girl Scouts.

 

Meanwhile, my son went from an honorary Girl Scout to a Tiger Cub Scout. His den was a mess and they needed a leader. I thought, Girl Scouts & Cub Scouts, how hard can this really be! Then they needed a Popcorn Kernal. Hey, cookies - popcorn, different seasons, why not! Then they said parents were not signing up their boys because they did not want to be Tiger leader. I said, can't happen! Webelos and Tigers, why not! Can't camp without BALOO training. Other Packs can't camp unless there are people to run BALOO trainings. Cub Scout Leaders need training, District needs trainers to make it happen. Then I watched my son sign on as an Asst Bear Den Leader! Then they asked me to be a UC - hey, how hard can this really be!

 

Why am I still doing this after 16 years? Because it's not hard at all, especially if you love it! I love watching the kids change, mature, and grow into great young men and women. I love watching the parents grow and change with them. I love it when you see an adult "get it". When you see that Spirit of Scouting kindle in their eyes. I love it when a boy you had as a Tiger comes back as a Den Chief.

 

I think the Scouting programs are the best things around for our kids.

 

 

 

 

 

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Why am I doing it? Initially, for the best and simplest reason ever, my son asked me to. That was just the first step in an ongoing journey that we both love. He is half way thru a trek at Philmont right now. Boy I miss him. After he left for Philmont, I took three days of vacation and went to Cub Resident camp where he had been staffing and volunteered. They worked me like a dog, but I've never enjoyed aweeping and mopping a dining hall so much. Scouting is probably the best gift he ever gave me. I joined for him and when he ages out, I'll stay because I want to continue giving back because of everything I have received.

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Mr Boyce and Fellow Scouters,

 

I had to ponder this question for a few days.

 

Then I considered, for myself, there would be two true answers.

A noble answer and an honest answer.

 

So the honest answer first.

 

I participate in Scouting for myself. Scouting and Venturing is a hoot! I would like to (state a little white lie) say that I brought a lot to Scouting, but in fact I have learned much more.

 

I have met many, many, many good friends. I've been to camps, rappelled, snorkeled, hiked, shot, climbed (and fallen), slide, frozen, sweat, and learned many new skills. etc, etc.

 

Mr Boyce asked,

Why are you Adults Doing This?

I am doing this for me.

 

So after my selfish rant.

My noble (and still true) answer. I am doing this for my own boys, and my friend's sons. Hopefully, they all get a kick out of Scouting like I do. Hopefully they too will buy into it, and take something home from Scouting.

 

Scouting Forever and Venture On!

Crew21 Adv

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They reason why i am a scouter is because i use to be a scout. I joined a local troop at age 11 in 2000 and fell in love with the program. scouting taught me many things and made me who i am today. I became a Eagle Scout in 2006 and a Vigil member of my lodge in 2007. I saw what scouting did for me and my life. When i turned 18 in march of 2007 i desided to stay in scouting and become an Assistant Scoutmaster as well as the Lodge Secretary for my lodge. I wanted to give back to this wonderful program and watch the younger kids grow in the program. i have seen to many kids fall into drugs and other things. i have lost friends to drinking and driving and i know some who are in prison. i dont want that to happen to any of the young men in the troop and i want to see these young men grow into good men. that why i am a scout.

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They reason why i am a scouter is because i use to be a scout. I joined a local troop at age 11 in 2000 and fell in love with the program. scouting taught me many things and made me who i am today. I became a Eagle Scout in 2006 and a Vigil member of my lodge in 2007. I saw what scouting did for me and my life. When i turned 18 in march of 2007 i desided to stay in scouting and become an Assistant Scoutmaster as well as the Lodge Secretary for my lodge. I wanted to give back to this wonderful program and watch the younger kids grow in the program. i have seen to many kids fall into drugs and other things. i have lost friends to drinking and driving and i know some who are in prison. i dont want that to happen to any of the young men in the troop and i want to see these young men grow into good men. that why i am a scout.

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They reason why i am a scouter is because i use to be a scout. I joined a local troop at age 11 in 2000 and fell in love with the program. scouting taught me many things and made me who i am today. I became a Eagle Scout in 2006 and a Vigil member of my lodge in 2007. I saw what scouting did for me and my life. When i turned 18 in march of 2007 i desided to stay in scouting and become an Assistant Scoutmaster as well as the Lodge Secretary for my lodge. I wanted to give back to this wonderful program and watch the younger kids grow in the program. i have seen to many kids fall into drugs and other things. i have lost friends to drinking and driving and i know some who are in prison. i dont want that to happen to any of the young men in the troop and i want to see these young men grow into good men. that why i am a scout.

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While I concurr with many of the sentiments expressed, I must admit to a selfish reason for signing on as an adult. The primary reason was to assist to the best of my ability to help the unit provide the best possible scouting experience for my son. As one of the few adults who were involved in the unit that had had previous scouting experience I saw where I could help a unit that was struggling a bit.

 

Since signing up, my son has Eagled/Aged out and is off to college in the fall. I continue to be involved with the unit for many of the reasons expressed, not the least of which is the adult association expressed by John-in-KC. Over the years of camping, hiking and dealing with challenges I have grown close to a number of other men & women who I find share similar outdoor interests and values, expecially their commitment to youth and their children.

 

SA

 

 

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Because I can either sit in front of the TV and watch all the bad that is happening in this world, or I can get out and do something about it.

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It keeps me from playing too much golf.

 

I got into it as I recognized that to have a successful program for my boys that I would have to be involved to keep it going. I was a Scout, and earned Eagle, however my focus is more toward supporting the organization as a whole. I do PR for the Council and District. (Whan time allows) and my wife and I have done the popcorn chair for 3 years. I supose when my boys age out I will too. It demands fresh energy.

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Honestly? Because my wife attended a Scout meeting and dutifully signed up her husband to be a leader (without my knowledge). That began a journey from Tiger Coordinator (before it was a formal den), to Den Leader, Webelos Den Leader, Assistant Scoutmaster to Scoutmaster with Unit Commissioner, Training Staff, Popcorn Chair (for district) and FOS presenter thrown in just in case I had a moment of free time.

 

Why have I stayed in? Because I believe that even with some of it's warts, the BSA program is a good one for my sons, my community and for our nation. Besides, I've made many new friends and learned to tie a bowline along the way. :)

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Because an organized and caring scout leader highly encouraged ALL parents in the Cub Den to be involved.

 

Then, after moving to a new community, summer Cub Day Camp introduced my sons to 12 new friends, so that the first day of school they each were welcomed by friends, not strangers.

 

As an adult, I have enjoyed the company of other adults. Scouting is a great collection of wonderful people and great role models for my sons. (Hearing the Scoutmaster Outdoor Training Camp Director admonish adults in another patrol to "quiet down" after throwing 20# of shrimp in a deep frier at 2AM told me that Adult Scouters still retain their sense of fun and the absurd.)

 

Most importantly, because I get to see a side of my sons that I would otherwise never get to see. How they interact with friends, how they react to challenges when called to "be a leader". What they are really listening to when plugged into their music (they play it on the car radio going to and from camping trips. I not only observe their growth in knowlege and poise, but the events that contribute to that confidence. I get to see not only my sons, but others in the troop under the above circumstances. Troop members are often lovingly treated as extended family. I have gotten to see them go from being nervous participants on their first camping trip to eager participants, distaining a tent and "tarping it" routinely (not tent involved) after being elected to the Order of the Arrow. I've watched the scouts in the troop go from being admonished not to make fun of a serious song (because the adult forgot that some of the guys were still sopranos), to being thoughtful considerate young men at their Eagle Court of Honor.

 

In other words, I'm in it for both my sons and me. Now that my last "Eagle" is off to college I continue to participate with boys, who I helped welcome into the troop after crossover, become men who achieve Eagle, and I love every minute of it.

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Scouting was my major activity throughout my childhood. I was very active in the Council as a youth. I continued my involvement after my 18th birthday largely due to the opportunities presented by the OA. I have remained active ever since. I do not have any children, but enjoy working with and challenging youth to test themselves.

 

I have 2 major reasons for staying involved:

#1) I tend to run interference for the youth and deflect the meddling, overbearing, stuffy adults. I've always got a smile and having fun and yet I seem to be able to get the "values" stuff across to the kids. I also wanted to model the good adult role models that I had a youth and hope that the youth have the same chance to grow as I did.

 

#2) I have fun. I meet people that I know share the same ideals and values. The best friendships that I have ever had have always been through Scouting, whether as a youth or an adult.

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Ditto to much of all the above.

 

Besides I can't stand kids. ;)

 

But I really enjoy scouting, scouts, and scouters and all that they let me do and learn. :)

 

How about you Mr. Boyce?

 

yis

Red Feather

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I want to emphatically thank people for their responses. I'm tremendously encouraged by them: it is great in this day and age to see people really want to make a positive contribution to the community. In my own case, I'm exploring a few scout-related projects.

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A very good question....

 

Having not done scouting beyond Cubs in my youth, it was my son bringing that flyer home in 1st grade that brought me to a meeting, that I went home being the Tiger den leader. I didn't become CM until 3 years later, but I had already saw a need to help with Day camp (PD). When it came time for him to choose a troop, we were asked to visit the local troop with our same, single digit, unit number. They were approaching their 68th year as a continuously chartered unit, the oldest in the Council, with virtually all of their boys approaching their 18th birthday. If we didn't join, the troop was going to be history. It was the history of the troop that caught my attention and so we joined, with my replacements coming with 8 or 9 Webelos, late this Fall. I still remind myself I am only doing this for my son, but since that new beginning, my daughter (who is 2 years older then my son), developed a passion for scouting by helping at 4 day camps, and wanted to join Venturing, when she finished 8th grade. I started a crew for her, that had a big influence on her non-academic interests, but have since turned it over to the younger, Assoc. Advisor. Now, I am the new chapter adviser for our OA chapter, as of last Fall, which has probably been the most fun of everything that has come my way in this volunteer run, movement. Why am I doing this? I still maintain it is for my kids, and I have plans to step aside before I get the Silver Beaver or Vigil. I enjoy the community of volunteers, very much, with our smallest district in the 3 district metro area, but do believe all of these positions are best done for no more then 3 years, with someone else being given a chance to take your place when you reach that point. Unfortunately for me, I don't see myself doing much beyond working with the youth, and my kids, and certainly don't see myself up there behind the podium, as is the destiny of those who were ahead of me, and whos kids are no longer active youth in the program.

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