Jump to content
Eagle1993

Protect Yourself Rules - New Training

Recommended Posts

On 6/6/2019 at 3:52 PM, RememberSchiff said:

Regarding lesson plans, less workbook and more simulated real-world exercises please.  Talk about news stories. For a den meeting,  we traveled to different locations and practiced what do if  a stranger grabs you. YELL "HELP YOU'RE NOT MY FATHER!".  "I''M NOT GOING WITH YOU" FIGHT. YELL.

Wow. I don't really know what to say about this. I agree with your point about more simulated real-world exercises, but practicing for such an incredibly rare occurrence such as stranger kidnapping? The amount of fear of strangers that is drilled into kids now days is not healthy. They are much more likely to need the help of a stranger than to be ever threatened by one. So how to do we teach them appropriate caution with strangers without instilling in them a constant fear?

If it was my kids that and an event like that was scheduled, I think I wouldn't let them go (of course, context is everything).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree abduction by strangers are more rare, but I believe the results more tragic. 

My advice about accepting help from strangers has been the usual. Don't go with a stranger, tell the stranger to bring more help to you. There is safety in numbers. 

Hopefully I am teaching caution, not fear, what we used to call street smarts. 

My $0.02, 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, RememberSchiff said:

I agree abduction by strangers are more rare, but I believe the results more tragic. 

My advice about accepting help from strangers has been the usual. Don't go with a stranger, tell the stranger to bring more help to you. There is safety in numbers. 

Hopefully I am teaching caution, not fear, what we used to call street smarts. 

My $0.02, 

But sometimes the correct thing to do is go with the stranger - the child might be in a dangerous area or situation.

The reality is that the classic kid snatched off the street by a pervert is really rare (some thing like 100 a year in the US. Most kidnappings of children are by family members involved in custody disputes). Kids are much more likely to be abused or killed by their parents or other relatives, hurt in car accidents, or even to suffer from a heart attack than becoming the next Elizabeth Smart. So why do we spend so much time and energy "teaching" kids about it (ok - because parents have a completely overblown fear about it)? Aren't we giving them an overblown sense of danger?

There are unfortunately too many examples of fear of strangers leading to poor or even tragic results. Kids not going for help in emergencies or when they were in trouble because that would require talking to strangers. What young kids should be taught is, when they need help, go to the first person you see and ask for help.

As I wrote earlier, it's all about context. We want to give our kids useful tools to function in a world that isn't always safe, without instilling unreasonable fears that will handicap them. Not always easy to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I hear what you are saying. There is certainly context involved in their decision making process which we should teach.  We teach scouts safety in nearly all areas even lightning where, as I understand,  yearly death and injuries for children are less numerically than stranger kidnapping. 

I have not watched all the new videos. I wonder if any scenarios depict a relative or a uniformed scout leader as the bad guy?

Edited by RememberSchiff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×