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NeverAnEagle

US adults not as smart as global counterparts . . .

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http://bigstory.ap.org/article/us-adults-score-below-average-worldwide-test

 

This lovely piece links education to national economic performance. (I suppose that warrants a big "DUH.")

 

I think part of the problem is that our culture no longer values education. Kids don't pay attention in school because their parents don't expect them too and the attitude at home is that school is unnecessary. The same kids who are disruptive in school will sit perfectly still in my Hunters Education class, because hunting is something the family values and the kid won't be able to hunt if they don't pass. In my area it seems that there is a greater value placed on getting one's hunting liscance than there is on getting a diploma, though in the long run the diploma (and hopefully some post-secondary training) will prove to be more beneficial in the long run.

 

Any thoughts on how this happened? What was the turning point when American's decided that education was unimportant? How can we combat this thinking and get children and adults to see education as necessary?

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The unfortunate part of the article is its initial premise. The "it's long been known...", is the narrative many would like us all to believe. Fortunately that narrative is extremely misleading. More info: http://www.epi.org/blog/international-tests-achievement-gaps-gains-american-students/ What is most unfortunate are the education policy decisions being foisted upon us by non-educators who believe the narrative promoted by those who have profit motives.

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The linked article reports US PISA scores are lower than scores in a handful of foreign countries with combined populations less than the US population. That's not compelling evidence that Americans don't think education is important.

 

The pattern of international and racial gaps in PISA scores isn't new. Past study of these gaps has suggested that "U.S. schools do about as well as the best systems elsewhere in educating similar students." http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...010904011.html

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I won't speculate in the genesis. But it sure doesn't help when we have positions railing against those "over educated Ivy League intellectuals". Yep lets lower our education bar. Or "I don't listen to economists regarding monetary or fiscal policy. I raised a family and learned all I need to know". (Slight paraphrase)

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I won't speculate in the genesis. But it sure doesn't help when we have positions railing against those "over educated Ivy League intellectuals". Yep lets lower our education bar. Or "I don't listen to economists regarding monetary or fiscal policy. I raised a family and learned all I need to know". (Slight paraphrase)
Politicians, not positions.

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The unfortunate part of the article is its initial premise. The "it's long been known...", is the narrative many would like us all to believe. Fortunately that narrative is extremely misleading. More info: http://www.epi.org/blog/international-tests-achievement-gaps-gains-american-students/ What is most unfortunate are the education policy decisions being foisted upon us by non-educators who believe the narrative promoted by those who have profit motives.
The link you posted talks about student scores, not adult scores. Also most of it's findings state that students in economically depressed areas score lower than students living in wealthy areas ( which again warrants a big "DUH."). The author states that if you compare students from wealthy areas they "score just as well as" the international averages of other countries . . . Unfortunately, we can't simply ignore the poor just because we don't like the test results--they live & work here too.

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The linked article reports US PISA scores are lower than scores in a handful of foreign countries with combined populations less than the US population. That's not compelling evidence that Americans don't think education is important.

 

The pattern of international and racial gaps in PISA scores isn't new. Past study of these gaps has suggested that "U.S. schools do about as well as the best systems elsewhere in educating similar students." http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...010904011.html

Um . . . The article I posted was about adults (up to age 65) not students. I beginning to wonder if this isn't an example of why adults are scoring below international averages in the US.

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I won't speculate in the genesis. But it sure doesn't help when we have positions railing against those "over educated Ivy League intellectuals". Yep lets lower our education bar. Or "I don't listen to economists regarding monetary or fiscal policy. I raised a family and learned all I need to know". (Slight paraphrase)
My favorite quote by George Bush is "I think I got a B in econ 101, but I get an A in keep taxes low." (And hurtling us toward a huge recession deficit. Of course he wouldn't have known that would have been the results of his tax cuts unless he went on to take econ 201.)

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I won't speculate in the genesis. But it sure doesn't help when we have positions railing against those "over educated Ivy League intellectuals". Yep lets lower our education bar. Or "I don't listen to economists regarding monetary or fiscal policy. I raised a family and learned all I need to know". (Slight paraphrase)
I will have to agree with you about politicians railing against those "over educated Ivy League intellectuals". I've listened to and read some of George Bush's gubernatorial addresses and they were far better than any of his speeches as president; they were clear, concise, and coherent. After he was elected as President and started pandering to the NASCAR crowd and rallying against intellectuals his speech changed so dramatically that I wondered (and still wonder) if he wasn't suffering from some form of Alzheimer's or dementia.

 

If you watch movies from the 1940's there are lots of mentions of "professor" and science/education is portrayed in a much better light than it is in anything I've seen recently.

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There was a two-page paid ad in the WSJ last week by the CEO of Exxon. He was encouraging the adoption of the Common Core standards in our schools and the importance of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). The new Common Core standards, adopted by 45 states so far, will make schools more challenging and more productive. Students will be learning at higher levels in English and math with an emphasis on critical thinking. Of course it isn't without controversy. Conservatives see it as another Obama power grab by nationalizing the educational system.

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There was a two-page paid ad in the WSJ last week by the CEO of Exxon. He was encouraging the adoption of the Common Core standards in our schools and the importance of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). The new Common Core standards, adopted by 45 states so far, will make schools more challenging and more productive. Students will be learning at higher levels in English and math with an emphasis on critical thinking. Of course it isn't without controversy. Conservatives see it as another Obama power grab by nationalizing the educational system.
The CC and the other "reforms" are attempt to fix something which isn't broken. It isn't the educational system which is broken...

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The linked article reports US PISA scores are lower than scores in a handful of foreign countries with combined populations less than the US population. That's not compelling evidence that Americans don't think education is important.

 

The pattern of international and racial gaps in PISA scores isn't new. Past study of these gaps has suggested that "U.S. schools do about as well as the best systems elsewhere in educating similar students." http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...010904011.html

The article began with a statement of "fact" regarding US students. My initial post was in response to that opening line.

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There was a two-page paid ad in the WSJ last week by the CEO of Exxon. He was encouraging the adoption of the Common Core standards in our schools and the importance of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). The new Common Core standards, adopted by 45 states so far, will make schools more challenging and more productive. Students will be learning at higher levels in English and math with an emphasis on critical thinking. Of course it isn't without controversy. Conservatives see it as another Obama power grab by nationalizing the educational system.
Well, something is broken. Nearly two-thirds of eighth-graders scored below proficient in math. Nearly three out of four eighth-and 12th-grade students cannot write proficiently. For African-American and Hispanic students across the country, dropout rates are close to 40 percent, compared to the national average of 27 percent. http://www.nagb.org/newsroom/naep-releases/2011-reading-math.html

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There was a two-page paid ad in the WSJ last week by the CEO of Exxon. He was encouraging the adoption of the Common Core standards in our schools and the importance of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). The new Common Core standards, adopted by 45 states so far, will make schools more challenging and more productive. Students will be learning at higher levels in English and math with an emphasis on critical thinking. Of course it isn't without controversy. Conservatives see it as another Obama power grab by nationalizing the educational system.
One problem with the NAEP scores article you posted and the 40% proficient... There are four levels of which the bottom level is the only one considered "failing" as it is below the basic competency. The proficient is the name of the second highest level. Reporting that 40 % of the students achieved a proficient level or higher is akin to saying 40% of the students received B's or higher.

 

The system isn't perfect, and there are certainly specific areas which need some help. However the current meme that the system is fundamentally flawed is false. It is much better than the perceived perfect system of generations ago when we supposedly ruled the world. There are pockets of areas in the US which are struggling academically because of other variables and they aren't the curriculum, schools or teachers.

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The linked article reports US PISA scores are lower than scores in a handful of foreign countries with combined populations less than the US population. That's not compelling evidence that Americans don't think education is important.

 

The pattern of international and racial gaps in PISA scores isn't new. Past study of these gaps has suggested that "U.S. schools do about as well as the best systems elsewhere in educating similar students." http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...010904011.html

If relating the adult phenomenon to student performance is "an example of why adults are scoring below international averages in the US," then the article itself is such an example. It notes that the phenomenon seen in students may carry over to adulthood where it reads: "This test could suggest students leaving high school without certain basic skills aren't obtaining them later on the job or in an education program."

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