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RandyPrice

High Adventure Height/Weight issues.

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If this has been discussed before please forgive me. I want to go with my son to Philmont this summer but have an issue with the strict height to weight chart. In my earlier life I played football and was a weightlifter and haven't been considered skinny since the 7th grade. My personal physician says I'm fine for the trip/hike. We brought this topic up at the last roundtable and MANY of the Scouters couldn't meet the requirements. I feel that if you have the approval of your personal doctor who knows all of your medical conditions that that is a better "guide" than a ht/wt scale. Any opinions???

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Yea, its been discussed, but the opinion is that your opinion doesn't matter (sorry). Its the rule that BSA is using for High Adventure and they won't budge. I'm at the upper end of the scale also... I run 2-3 miles several times a week, play basketball, hike, etc... but if I gain another 5 pounds I'm out, so I gotta put down the fork.

 

 

 

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Thanks CA Scouter for the reply. Sorry to repeat another thread. BSA's policy is going to force alot of Scouters to either starve or not be able to go on trips w/the sons.

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>>BSA's policy is going to force alot of Scouters to either starve or not be able to go on trips w/the sons.

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Thanks Eagledad for your comments and I do understand that BSA doesn't want to have people dying at high adventure camps. That said, if my personal physican says I'm good to go who is the BSA with their ht/wt chart to say no? I guess since they own it they can make the rules but it WILL hurt the opportunity of many Scouters to attend the trip. JMO, Randy Price

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The weight/height tables are only part of the whole approach to the situation. It's a big part, but only part.

 

When I went to Philmont I trained for a whole year, but because I didn't have the thin air to acclimate to, the trek was a struggle. I have flat feet, flat enough to be 4-F during the Vietnam War when anyone breathing was taken. I was 50 years old at the time and I was 20#'s UNDER the upper limit on the height/weight table.

 

It was a personal challenge/struggle for me. I made it through, but I would have enjoyed the trek more if I had been 18 years old.

 

At 59 years of age, my doctor says there are no restrictions keeping me from participating in any activity including any and all in the BSA program. Yet as each year passes, getting that 80# canoe up off the ground is that much more difficult and I'm still under the height/weight table requirements. I'm a lot happier with my 40# kayak where I can still get out with the boys and enjoy the activities.

 

If one is planning on Philmont this summer there is plenty of time to make the adjustment to the height/weight table. Maybe 4-6 miles a couple times a week, extra weight in the pack, and less time at the dinner table would help out. I know of one gentleman in my former troop that was "overweight" according to the table. He was all muscle and could easily carry two 80# canoes, one on each shoulder. But the BSA needs to implement some kind parameters to insure proper dynamics to everyone involved. I know that's tough to bear by 1% of those who don't face these problems, but the other 99% is what BSA worries about.

 

Stosh

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We have an ASM who is "undertall" vs. overweight. He is planning on attending Northern Tier but needs to lose 30 lbs by late summer. Feasible yes but not likely. Still waiting to see if he is going to lose weight or back out.

 

While Philmont is wilderness, you are never more than half a day hike from a camp with communications. Northern Tier is a bit more wilderness.

 

Great guy and good outdoor skills. Adds a great diminson to the overall leadership team of the troop. But I concerned that I and the scouts would have to treat for medical issues in the field due to his current diminsions.

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it was my understanding that when there was an issue with the requirements that contact needed to be made to the facility and some adjustments may be made - like using body fat index etc...

 

would be worth a shot at least

 

if you do go I hope you have a great time.

 

my son is slated to go the summer of 2011 - I won't be going, I have a bad habit that makes hiking long miles with thin air very, very hard to do.

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My son worked at Philmont last summer as a ranger. Not sure if the rules were enforced to the pound but I think he told me 38 adults were not allowed to go on the trail due to weight issues. He ending up filling in a crew that was short and got to go on a full trek.

 

You do a diservice to the scouts throwing the dice and not making weigh-in.

 

Time to switch to lean cuisine.

 

 

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