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red feather

campin, cookin, survival tidbits

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As an alternative to charcloth for flint and steel, use a fire tube...a short length of cotton rope threaded through a piece of copper or brass tubing about 3 inches in lenght. Char the end, and use the same as charcloth. To extingush the end just pull the rope into the tube........

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Smush (18th century Gator Aide)

 

Berries - 1 or 2 quarts (Blackberries, Raspberries, etc.)

 

Vinegar - Red Wine, or Balsamic

 

Crock or glass container

 

Rinse the berries letting them drain a bit before putting them in the crock.

 

Cover the berries just barely to the top with the vinegar smashing just a bit with a wooden spoon. Let set in the frig for 24 to 48 hours...then

 

Puree in a blender and simmer slowly adding sugar to taste (about 4 cups). Let cool and strain through cheese cloth.

 

Store in a glass bottle...to use, mix one to one with cold, or ice water

 

 

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Like the cotton rope idea. Will try it on next overnight. Having some trouble generating good sparks with flint and steel. Any suggestions??

 

Has anyone had any experience with the 'Swedish Altar Fire' type of fire lay?

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Come on folks... don't let me think that no one in this forum has something to contribute. New posters, readers, come on give. It won't hurt I promise.

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laninated morse code cards. So even those of us who forget can signal.

 

Printers loop (10X magnifing glass) Look at plans rock and bugs through it and gain a greater appreciation of God's handy work.

 

Buddy Berners

I haven't done this yet but I am planning on taking my digital camera out to our favorite camping spots and take pictures of all the different plans, then go to the local university and have someone identify them all, then put them in a booklet and give to each new scout. thus we will have a book of plants that we know we will see.

 

Tine in a bucket. cut a hole in the center of the bucket lid and put the spool of twin in it. (a spool of twin cost between $10-15 and has over 100 feet in it) makes pioneering happen.

 

give the historian film or a disposable camera and have him take pictures. with the rule that every picture has to have a scout in it and every scout needs to be in a picture.

 

on trips with travel time of more than an hour bring a merit badge counceler along and work on the lecture part of the merit badge.

 

Create traditions.

 

james

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James here's a helpful tip. On your twine bucket put the hole in the side of the bucket just below the rim of the lid. That way when the bucket gets left in the rain, your twine stays dry. It doesn't effect the out-feed of the twine either.

 

Bob

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Redfeather,

 

Just taking a wild guess I feel that there are two possible problems... First, that the steel in your striker may be too hard. Mine was hand forged by a blacksmith to a hardness factor of around 4.5 which gives excellant sparks. As you know, it is the flint that shreds the steel, and friction from the downward blow that ignites the steel shards producing the sparks. If you are using a striker made of a modern chrome alloy steel, it's hardness factor may be near that of the flint, thus producing the weak sparks......the best solution is to have one made by a blacksmith...Or, two, you need to nap the flint to produce a sharper edge that will cut the steel....

 

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Looking for experience with a fire lay called a swedish alter fire that has three poles 2-3 high set vertical on the ground with a teepee fire to start it. One report says it can generate temps as high as 4000 degrees.

 

Looking for suggestions of how to cook a turkey on a tripod. have one system looking for more.

 

 

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Homemade firestarters made from dryer lint, candle wax & fiber egg cartons.

 

Soup in a bread bowl! Excellent & no clean-up (except the spoon).

 

Ed Mori

Scoutmaster

Troop 1

1 Peter 4:10

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When at Philmont....

 

I used a half dozen or so medium size safety pins to air dry socks/clothes on the backpack while hiking. Also use them as clothespins while in camp.

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Empty film canister held homemade sewing kit. I carry along a full bobbin of black nylon thread. It's super strong.

The first 4 days into Philmont last June, I had stitched about 5 items for myself and others, from a pant tear to backpack staps. Used a drop of Super Glue on the finished sewing knot.

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Earplugs,....for when tented next to snorers.

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When you're packing for backpacking, what does the item weight, how important is it, and how much will it compress?

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Smart Wool Expedition Socks.

Smart Wool Expedition Socks.

Smart Wool Expedition Socks,

with liners.

80 miles with -no- blisters.

;^)

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Spatulate your dirty utensils so to save water during clean up.

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Camp Suds, the little green soap bottle. You can wash clothes, dishes, yourself and your dog with it. Haven't tried brushing my teeth tho.

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8x mononcular. Small, lightweight.

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A whistle is good.

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When hiking with group, designate one to be a cameraman. Carry extra batteries/film for him. Have him shoot pictures till the cows come home.

Fun to enjoy later at home for years to come.

Have him use ultra small tripod with velcro strap so can attach camera to tree limb or chair.

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Lightweight foldable frisbee.

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Attach your rehydrator mouthpiece to a name badge retractable cord fixed on upper part of shirt. No fussing with having to unclip and clip mouthpiece. The retractable cord will hold it in place until thirsty again.

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Carry along ultra lightweight folding backpack chair with back support. Much better than the tripod chair.

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Extra boot laces.

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Habeneros hot sauce to jazz up food. Extremely hot, so a little goes a long way. (saves weight)

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Handkerchief is handy.

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Backpacker towel, ultra lightweight. Cut it in half, save more weight.

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If you gotta have morning coffee use crystals. Ultra lightweight. Or just quit while on the trail,......saves weight.

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Carry along a precount of aspirin, vitamin I in film cansiter. Well, bring many extras and hand them out to those who need them.

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Phew! Fingers need a rest.

 

Randy

ASM

Troop 145

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rmal thanks for the input. Much of this forum is geared to rather isoteric ideas, but I am hoping for real life ideas. Thanks for the info. You might look into kite string for sowing, just as strong and has uses for snares, floss, etc. The back frame is a good source for storage, duct tape, wire. I like the metal shower curtain hangers as they can be used as emergency pack pins.

 

Have you heard of the fire lay I described?

 

YIS

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No, don't believe I heard of that kind of fire lay. 4,000f degrees sounds a bit hot, - with hunters stew, I hope one would like the added thickening flavor of melted dutch oven!

I'd like to see one in action. Didn't have any luck running "Swedish Alter Fire" at Google.

Good ideas with string, shower curtain holders.

 

Interesting to read some of my dad's old WWII Army Air Corp survival books. Quite a few ideas there, one being a monkey trap! HA.

 

Being new here, is this board html active?

 

Randy

 

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Red feather: Are you talking about a "Swedish Chimney"? We've used them quite often. You need three split logs about 20" to 24" long.Stack them tipi fashion and with a wire coat hanger or other suitable wire, wrap around the top of the tipi or chimney. The lower part of the three stack logs will be spread and inside is where you start a small "twiggy fire" . The fire generates a draft that ignite the inside of the three split logs and the "Swedish Chimney" will burn for quite awhile especially if you keep tightening the tipi up . Be sure to feed the twiggy fire until the logs "take off" and you can feel the heat coming up the middle of your chimney. We use it for coffee pots and stews. The pot goes on top of the chimney and the heat gets really intense from the draft . Neat thing is you can handle the logs from the outside because they stay quite cool. Scouts are amazed that it works . Its important that the three split logs be of equal length to provide a platform for the your pot. You can do three or four at a time and have a "Four burner Stove" in the field. Dekota hole is really cool too. You probably know about it but if not just ask. I hope this helps. YIS : Steve

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