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robvio

Removing existing badges

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I need to know what is the best way to remove old council patches, unit numerals and rank badges. I am sure the iron on adhesive is a pain and it will leave spots.

 

Your best ways appreciated.

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Cut the thread. :-)

 

Seriously, I've never used the iron on or any type of glue for that very reason.

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One of the first things I teach each member of the NBP is how to sew on patches. There is nothing that will wreck a shirt faster than glue or iron-on attempts to adhere patches. A poor job of sewing can always be corrected, a good job of gluing can't.

 

Stosh

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robvio, let me ask why? Usually it is because people want to "recycle" an experienced uniform. But in that case, so what if there are spots where the council patch, unit numerals, etc. were? You're going to put new patches over those same locations, right? But yes, the adhesive leaves stains and no, I don't know any way to remove those.

 

You know what really annoyed me was that I melted the iron-on backing off a patch (that I had sewn on) and all over the front of a shirt one time by putting it in the dryer. That shirt is my official "messy job at camp" uniform shirt now.

 

By the way - for those who buy used uniform shirts on line - always a good question to ask before bidding - how are the current patches adhered?

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I'm not aware that the BSA ever produced a true "iron-on" patch. There were cloth-backed, gauze-backed, and the current plastic-backed. Some moms (and dads :-)) mistake the plastic back for iron-on adhesive, but it's not like the iron-on knee patches that my mom used in the 60's. I have seen Star scouts still wearing a second-class patch. Their answer..."my mom never sewed the new one on." They know that's not an acceptable excuse. When I was a scout, that new rank badge or merit badge would get sewn on (by me) the same night as the COH. It's a different world.

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Lisabob,

 

My current unit is new, and I have a couple of kids crossing over from webelos and need new unit numerals. Yes, the parents did iron them on and yes I do agree that sewing is the better option.

 

But, removal of ironed on patches will leave the mark. Nothing can be done for that.

 

But should one steam the back side of the ironed on patch for removal? Does that work? Or just regular re-ironing to heat the patch work?

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FWIW.

 

When I was a kid, there was something called 'stich witchery'. It was a gauze like material you could cut out and use to iron on materials, like patches. For awhile I tried to use it on my uniform shirts. I found that: I had to remove the plastic backing from the patches, otherwise they'd fall off, also, the stuff left a reside behind if you removed the patch. Also, the patches would come loose when they went thru the wash, and I had to redo the stichwitchery.

 

Eventually, I gave up and either sewed the patches themselves or got my aunt to do them. Some of the scout shops in the area will sew patches on the uniforms, for a small per-patch cost.

 

BSA now makes available some iron on materials for patches. I've never used them and am frankly am a bit leary of doing so. Now a days, I'll sew my patches on my uniform myself. And I'm a single, middle-aged guy. I taught myself to sew as a kid. Have the kids learn how to do it.

 

 

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I recently bought a few shirts from a second hand store and ran into the "sticky" situation. After I removed the patch I sprayed some WD40 and let it sit. Then I was able to scrap off the sticky stuff and wash the shirt with no residue left behind

YIS

amy

 

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Trailblazermom brings up a good point. A lot of glues are oil soluble. I suggest trying baby oil, as it won't have the solvent that WD40 has and will probably work fine too.

 

SWScouter

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