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mom22scouts

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About mom22scouts

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  1. mom22scouts

    Trash to treasure

    I couldn't find the link to the directions I used last year. But the basics are: use a clean tin can, label removed. Fill it with water and freeze it - this makes it easier to punch holes in the can without crushing it. Punch a design into the can using various sizes of nails. Place a small candle in the empty can. I made up some standard designs - christmas tree, star, and so on. Some of my kids chose to make their own. My assistant and I worked with a couple of kids at a time, so that we could supervise them with hammers and nails. I think they had as much fun chipping the ice out of the cans as they did making the designs.
  2. mom22scouts

    By the way....moms aren't allowed....

    It's not a southern thing, or a Texas thing. It happens in other areas as well. I'm in the midwest and my son's troop only wants dads (or other male relatives) to go camping with the Troop. I've heard the "male bonding" comment from our leaders. Personally, I don't really want to go camping, so it's not a big deal to me. But there are some moms who want to camp and backpack - why shouldn't they be able to go? We also don't have any women in Troop leadership - even as committee members. I have more of a problem with this as many of the Cub Scout leaders, including myself, are moms.
  3. mom22scouts

    Trash to treasure

    A project that my Webelos enjoyed was tin can lanterns. We've also done milk jug bird feeders. We painted small jigsaw puzzle pieces green and made wreath ornaments for the Christmas tree. And the thing that they enjoyed most was doing junk art (I think technically it's called a construction) for the Artist badge.
  4. mom22scouts

    New 2nd Year Webelo

    Thanks so much for all the advice. Your thoughts confirm that I'm going in the right direction. I've talked to the new scout's parents to let them know what's going on - and the amount of work involved in joining as a second year Webelos scout. They are interested in having him continue to Boy Scouts, but don't really care if he earns his Arrow of Light or not. So, we'll try to do as much as we can and still have fun. I knew I'd get some good thoughts here!
  5. mom22scouts

    New 2nd Year Webelo

    I'm a 2nd year Webelos leader and I have just learned that I have a brand new scout joining my den. I've talked to his parents about the amount of work involved in joining at this time. Their only concern is that it not be discouraging for him. I'm looking for some tips and suggestions on how to get him through his Bobcat and Webelos badges and hopefully the Arrow of Light before our crossover in February. Thanks!
  6. mom22scouts

    How many adults

    To the best of my knowledge, our troop does not limit the number of adults attending outings. However, they do limit who can attend - only men are accepted. We have a very well qualified and trained mother who goes to summer camp every year. However, she cannot camp with the troop - she stays in the family camp area. As a mother, I can visit my son at camp. My husband could stay. The troop has no women in any official leadership roles. There are not even any women serving on the troop committee. It's quite difficult for some of us to deal with.
  7. mom22scouts

    What would you do?

    This topic has pulled me out of "lurk" mode, as this happened at our summer camp several years ago. A 16 year old star scout ignited an aerosol can and it exploded. In addition to being sent home from camp, the scout had to give a presentation on fire safety to the entire troop. I understand he took the assignment seriously and did a very good job. As Rooster mentioned, the other thing to consider is the past history of the scouts involved. In our case, the scout had some negative history. He had on-going issues with inappropriate language, and was supposedly being watched closely after picking up and shaking a younger, smaller scout and saying something that was felt by the younger scout to be a threat. There were many who felt that he should not have been allowed to return.
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