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nuwriter

Things you learn on the trail

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What would you want to know, over 30 years with the Katahdin Area and Connecticut Rivers Councils as both a volunteer and a professional covering the North Star, Penquis, Waldo, and Mohegan Districts?

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Me? Mostly interested in hearing about Maine High Adventure Camp and OKPIK programs if you were involved or experienced them.

Edited by RememberSchiff

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Well written.

Oh, for the love of laurel thickets who teach so brutally that your GPS maps are a lie!

Welcome to the forums!

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Maine High Adventure is a great program. It's the most flexible "camp-type" program I've ever been around. You get there and then plan your trek at the base camp (which you cannot drive to, you need to get in by boat). 

 

It's a bit of an odd setup, as it used to be run by National. Then it was run by the Pine Tree and Katahdin Area Councils in conjunction. Then Pine Tree dropped out. 

 

When I was there, we started a program where you could take your troop to Camp Roosevelt, and then your older scouts would go for a four-day trek a couple of hours up the road at Maine High Adventure.

 

During my time as Lodge Staff Adviser, we did OA Ordeals there too. Really rustic, but beautiful facility.

 

We did Okpik at Camp Roosevelt in Eddington. Scouts built their quinzees right on the pond. Temperatures didn't usually get about 0 for most of the weekends. Never a shortage of snow. Usually about 15-20 scouts.

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My most recent lesson from the last little trek:

If you lose that piece of gear your wife bought you for Christmas,

Buy its replacement before she finds out!

 

True story: this group of boys were surprisingly up and at 'em and ready to hit the trail each morning.

I am usually last to pull out of camp. Finishing coffee, pulling together loaned gear, site check ...

Gives me some peace and quiet on the trail.

Anyway, last day, I get to the extraction and realize my sandals aren't clipped in.

So when we get home, I post a notice on a page for folks who hike the area.

Next weekend, there's a post from a guy with a picture of my sandals AND MY HEADLAMP that were left neatly on the rock that served as my cooking table ... ready to be packed. Shure enough, that wasn't in the expect pocket of my pack either.

The fella said he left them at the trailhead. Evidently he'd never learned about finders-keepers. Clearly he'd missed my post when planning his trip.

Turns out, had he brought them home he would have been just on the other side of town. Instead of a good Sunday dinner with a complete stranger, I wasted a trip to Sportsman's Warehouse looking for a model they did not have.

The kids all witnessed this online dialogue, but the Mrs. didn't. I figured I was in the clear until the next sports store visit.

So, the other night when we were trying to fish a moth out of Son #1's ear (!)

Mrs. Q hollers for me to get my headlamp on account of all of our heads blocking the light above the man's head on the kitchen table.

With no small amount of snickers, Daughter-in-law says, "He left it on the Sods."

 

Let's just say the fan and vicinity required cleaning.

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Maine High Adventure is a great program. It's the most flexible "camp-type" program I've ever been around. You get there and then plan your trek at the base camp (which you cannot drive to, you need to get in by boat). 

 

It's a bit of an odd setup, as it used to be run by National. Then it was run by the Pine Tree and Katahdin Area Councils in conjunction. Then Pine Tree dropped out. 

 

When I was there, we started a program where you could take your troop to Camp Roosevelt, and then your older scouts would go for a four-day trek a couple of hours up the road at Maine High Adventure.

 

During my time as Lodge Staff Adviser, we did OA Ordeals there too. Really rustic, but beautiful facility.

 

We did Okpik at Camp Roosevelt in Eddington. Scouts built their quinzees right on the pond. Temperatures didn't usually get about 0 for most of the weekends. Never a shortage of snow. Usually about 15-20 scouts.

 

Thanks for the info. Both are always on the initial PLC year planning list but never make the final cut. :(  We almost did OKPIK, but got nervous due to another very mild winter this year.

Edited by RememberSchiff

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