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nwscouttrainer

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About nwscouttrainer

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  1. nwscouttrainer

    BALOO at Univeristy of Scouting

    The concerns that you have expressed here are precisely the same ones that I had when it was proposed that we try to offer BALOO at U of S. The suggestions is being supported by our Council Training Chairman,though, who has never taught the course (and may not have actually ever taken it). It was my suggestion that we research it thouroughly before we commit to it to make sure that it is a possibility. While I doubt that anything done at U of S would be equal to what is presented when we just concentrate on doing BALOO, I wanted to make sure that someone hadn't figured out a way to do it that got all of the content in without too much compromise. So far I have found at least 5 councils that do offer BALOO at U of S in 6 hours. The responses I have gotten back as to how they do it are not exactly encouraging.
  2. nwscouttrainer

    BALOO at Univeristy of Scouting

    Do you know how the BALOO course was structur3ed when it was offered at your U f S? I am trying to worek out what would have been pred down, scaled, back or cut. Thanks
  3. Has anyone ever offered BALOO as a course at University of Scouting? We are looking at adding it to this year's course list, but I have concerns about how to fit what normally runs as an 8-hour program into a 6-hour event. Has anyone here done this, and if so, how did you structure the class to get all of the material covered?
  4. Actually, the training is the only thing in question, and then, only in how it compares to today's training as far as the requirement for the award goes. I actually do have proof that the individual completed Scoutmaster's Fundamentals back in 1998 and have since learned that the training at that time did encompass all that they get from the current courses - just in a different format. As for the other requirements...well, there is no question that he has done the activities required. The volunteer in question is our new Council Commissioner, and a person does not get nominated nor elected for such a position (at least in our council) without an impressive track record of service at the troop, district and council level. What started the whole inquiry was someone asking why, after so many years as a scouter, he had no training knots to show for it. Back when he first went thorough all of the training, it was the custom in the council for your committee chair to complete and submit the paperwork on your behalf without your knowledge. Apparently at that time it was not done and so he (and others of his contemporaries) never received any knots). He was told to look into getting the paperwork compelted now and I was given the task of determining whether the training he went through in 1998 met the requirements for the award as it is written now. It has been decided that it does and so we see no reason to delay giving him his knot.
  5. Hi, I was asked the following question... If a scoutmaster went through all the required training as it existed in the early 1990's, but never filled out the progress award application to get his knot, could he do so today, given that the current progress training award says: 1) Complete Boy Scout Fast Start training 2) Complete New Leader Essentials 3) Complete Leader Specific Training for your position 4) Complete Introduction to Outdoor Leader Skills (for Scoutmasters and assistants) According to this leader, he never applied for the knot because back then, Council required that someone else complete and submit it for you on your behalf. You simply did not fill it out yourself. I have only been in scouting since 2002 and have never seen any of the paperwork that existed prior to that time. Thanks for any info on this. Paula Ball
  6. nwscouttrainer

    District Committee Best Practices

    Hi, My district is in the process of trying to reinvigorate itself, attract new members, and, overall, deliver a qulity program to our youth. What are some things that your district/district committee does well or gets right? Thanks, Paula Ball Training Chair NW Disitrict ESC
  7. nwscouttrainer

    Conflict amoung the scouts

    Well, things may be looking up. One of the newer leaders who has not been able to go on many of the campouts due to work conflicts, but is usually at the troop meetings, has decided to step up and try to get the other leaders to recognize the conflict among the boys. He and I had quite a long talk about the situation, and he is in agreement that something must be done to correct the behavior before it escalates. Talking to some of the boys directly does no good as they either deny they have misbehaved, or blow it all off as just a joke. When fighting broke out this past weekend, he made all of the participants stop and recite the scout law then discuss how they were violating it. He then reminded them that as scouts, their adherence to the Oath and Law was required just as much as being able to tie knots, build fires or complete a five mile hike when it comes to earning rank. If they cannot display behavior in accordance with the Oath and Law, they may not be ready to be awarded First or Second Class Rank. We'll see if this tactic works in getting the desired behavior - or getting rid of the ones we don't want.
  8. nwscouttrainer

    Conflict amoung the scouts

    >>> just how much time do you have? Never enough! But then I'm used to multitasking as all scout leaders are. LOL
  9. nwscouttrainer

    Conflict amoung the scouts

    >>> Yah, this sounds like Merlyn and Ed, eh? Okay...I'm new to this forum so can someone explain to me who Merlyn and Ed are?
  10. nwscouttrainer

    Conflict amoung the scouts

    Thanks for your replies...here is the background detail on the troop and the patrols. The troop is actually one of the oldest troops in our council - operating since 1914. It has a reputation for being one of the best troops in the district, with several leaders being key players for the district and the council. The SM, ASM, Committee Chair, several committee members are all trained...even Woodbadge trained and, in fact, have served as Woodbadge staff the last few years. The average age of these leaders ranges from 50 to 83. There are some newer leaders, who have entered the troop in the last year or two when their sons crossed over who are trained as far as being Cub Scout leaders, but have never taken either SM/ASM specific, nor Troop Committee Challenge. Because of the older, experienced leaders, they are taking a passive role in the troop at this time. In the past, the troop has averaged around 25 or 30 boys. In the last few years, most of those scouts have aged out of the program or have shifted over into venturing. That, coupled with the failure by the troop to actively go after new boys in recent years, very few new boys have crossed over to replace the ones who have left. As a result, the troop now has only about 9 active boys with 2 or 3 others who show up from time to time. The troop now has only two patrols, one with the 12 yr old sixth graders who all crossed over last March, and the second with the 13 year old seventh graders who crossed over two years ago. There are 4 boys in each patrol. The SPL is the oldest at 15 and SPL more out of necessity than desire because of his age. He has not gone to NYL Training. The actual conflict is occurring within the 6th grade patrol, with two of the boys ganging up against a third boy in the patrol who is usually backed by one or two members of the 7th grade patrol. The other member of the 6th grade patrol tries not to get involved as do the other 7th graders. The arguments can be over anything...if one boy expresses an interest in a football team, one of the rivals will jump in with comments about how bad the team is and off it goes. What is so disturbing is the intensity with which the arguments escalate until boys are standing nose to nose with the disagreement shifting from the original topic to personal insults aimed at each other. It got so bad at the last troop meeting that one boy began to insult the parentage of the other without even caring that the father of the other boy who is one of the newer leaders in the troop was standing within ear shot! As I mentioned in my previous post, the boys in these patrols came from two different packs, and the division is occuring along the former pack lines, for the most part. I cannot speak to the behavior of the boys who came from one of the packs when they were Cubs, but can tell you that the two that came from my son's pack were always competative in nature, but not as overtly aggressive as this and were never allowed to behave this way when they were at the pack level since it did not conform to the pack's code of conduct. It simply wasn't tolerated by the leaders there. I have expressed my concern to the SM and Committee Chair about the conflict, but have seen nothing done to address it or reduce it. My son, who is not directly involved in the fighting, is asking to quit the troop because he feels that too muich time is wasted on arguing and not enough time on troop activities. I can't say that I disagree with him. Hopefully this additional information helps.
  11. nwscouttrainer

    Conflict among the scouts

    How are personality conflicts and fighting among scouts within a troop handled? My son's troop has two distinct groups within it who cannot stand each other and are unable to discuss anything without an argument breaking out which rapidly disolves into trading insults and other verbal attacks. So far the arguments have remained verbal, but there have been times when it looked like it could turn physical. The boys involved range from ages 12 to 13, and orignally came to the troop from two different packs. The SPL is, himself, only 15 and has a hard time maintaining order during meetings whenever the two factions decide to go at it. My son, who is not a part of either faction, finds the whole situation very distressing, especially since all activities come to a halt as these boys square off against each other. What action, if any, should the adult leaders be taking with regard to the conflict that arises at eavery meeting/outing? Should they leave the boys alone to work it out, or do they actively intervene to keep the peace? Thanks.
  12. nwscouttrainer

    Conflict amoung the scouts

    How are personality conflicts and fighting among scouts within a troop handled? My son's troop has two distinct groups within it who cannot stand each other and are unable to discuss anything without an argument breaking out which rapidly disolves into trading insults and other verbal attacks. So far the arguments have remained verbal, but there have been times when it looked like it could turn physical. The boys involved range from ages 12 to 13, and orignally came to the troop from two different packs. The SPL is, himself, only 15 and has a hard time maintaining order during meetings whenever the two factions decide to go at it. My son, who is not a part of either faction, finds the whole situation very distressing, especially since all activities come to a halt as these boys square off against each other. What action, if any, should the adult leaders be taking with regard to the conflict that arises at eavery meeting/outing? Should they leave the boys alone to work it out, or do they actively intervene to keep the peace? Thanks.
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