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KoreaScouter

Got an LED flashlight yet?

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While I also like the minimag light, I want to get me an LED light soon. I'm thinking that when I buy a headlamp, I'll get one with the LED feature.

 

Red is good because you dont lose your "night vision" where as white or yellow will do that to you. Green is also good for that same reason.

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I know that red is good for night vision... ever since I read the book "Up Periscope" when I was a kid, but my objection to red Leds for general use is that it is very difficult to focus your eyes in that light to read the details of a map or read small text in a book. It is just the physics of the longer wavelength... try it sometime. Also many of the red Leds are so intense that an adult leader may mistake one for a laser pointer and confiscate it at summer camp! The white Leds are getting so good with compensation for blue, lower current consumption, and with beam definition they are really the best way to go.

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I just picked up two neat little LED lights.

 

INOVA X1: A little LED flashlight with one white LED with a magnified lens and operates on one AAA alkaline battery.

 

INOVA X5: A small LED Flashlight with 5 LEF bulbs and operates on 2 123 lithium batteries. A little bigger than a Mag Solitaire light.

 

Both are available in brushed stainless steel or black bodies. Waterproof and practically indestructable. Both come with a little belt pouch and a slot in the housing for a lanyard. ABout 5 inches long and 5/8" diameter.

 

Not inexpensive but not terribly expensive either. The X1 is about $25 and the X5 is about $45.

 

My opinion is that for all the money I have spent over the years on regular flashlights and batteries; for most applications LEDs are the way to go. They cost a little more up front but more than make up for it in battery cost savings (if you don't lose the light that is).

 

Nearly all my lights are now LED: Photon Microlights, Energizer LED Headlight, PrincetonTEC Attitude light, Eveready folding Tube LED light. I can carry much more light, in smaller lighter packages, and the light lasts longer on a set of batteries. In most cases, even the batteries are small.

 

 

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I don't have one yet and I'm wondering how far do they throw their beam?

 

"I know that red is good for night vision... ever since I read the book "Up Periscope" "

 

Great book as were all the Robb White stories. I wonder if they are even still in print.

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I have an LED headlight and I absolutely love it. It has both red and white light. I got it for Christmas, so I am not sure how expensive it was. It's an engergizer and works beautifully.

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the best website I have been to is

 

www.eliteLED.com

 

Many high quality flashlights for low prices. Everything from shaking and hand-pump flashlights, to head lamps and high power LED flashlights.

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FOG:

 

As far a how far a LED light beam can go. Depends on the light. There are some larger LEDs and some actually have a magnifier lens that helps through the beam farther.

 

I still carry a 3 D cell mag light in my vehicle - but have converted all the lights I carry camping to LED and advise other Scouts and Scouters to do the same.

 

I carry a Photon Microlight everwhere with me. They are great little lights.

 

 

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My Coleman lantern with duel florescent bulbs attracks every bug within 100 yards. Does this happen with the LED light? If so, it would seem annoying with all these bugs attracted to one's face.

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I haven't had any problems with my Princeton Tech Aurora LED headlamp. I don't tend to have it on while sitting still though. It is only on when I'm walking, setting up camp, or doing other chores. I can see where bugs might find me if I was standing still cleaning dishes, but to date we usually have dinners cleaned up before it gets too dark, so it isn't a problem.

 

Also, I tend to keep the light level at the lowest usable setting to conserve batteries. Keeping the light low may help reduce the attraction by insects.

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I have the same 3-way headlight that OWL62 mentioned (Ray-o-vac?) and I LOVE it. The three way switch goes from off - 1 red LED - 3 white LEDs - 1 white bulb. I bought it for $12 at Mejier. It takes 3 AAAs.

 

The red (first position) preserves your night vision and is enough light to take care of most chores. I rarely go to the white because it is so nice to keep your eyes well-adjusted. The white LEDs are quite bright, but the bulb is brighter yet. The bulb is definitely more "yellow" than the LEDs, even though it is a pretty bright bulb. I almost never use the bulb, but it is nice to have some extra brightness in reserve.

 

I also have a little 3-LED white flashlight that takes 1 AA. It has a nifty switch where you screw the back end in (like a mag light, sort-of) until it turns on and stays on. If you back off a bit, you can use a button on the back to get light ony when you press the button -- good for signalling. I have used this one for reading, etc. and never worry about the battery -- I have yet to change it. Just one AA backup battery would be plenty for a long outing, and I'd feel comfortable skipping the backup for a weekend if I knew the battery was fresh.

 

These lights are so good, I leave my 2-AA mini-mag at home now. It (with its back-up batteries) is just too heavy and bulky!

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Love my LED flashlight and headlamp... won't own anything else.

They seem to go forever on batteries and provide great light.

That and they are lighter and more compact.

 

2 thumbs up!

 

Jerry

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In my continuous pursuit of sizing down, and in support of LED lights due to their reliability and long lasting light, I picked up an LED lantern.

 

Made by Garrity. It's a 4 LED light with three modes of brightness and one flashing mode. Operates on 3 C sized Alkaline Batteries. it cylindrically shaped, about 4 iches in disameter and about 8 inches high. Weighs about a half a pound. Cost about $25.

 

Seems promising. Package says the light will run for 200 hours on 3 batteries. I tried it out in a darkedn bathroom (about the size of my tent) and it appears to emit plenty of light.

 

Will try it on a campout next month.

 

 

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In my continuous pursuit of sizing down, and in support of LED lights due to their reliability and long lasting light, I picked up an LED lantern.

 

Made by Garrity. It's a 4 LED light with three modes of brightness and one flashing mode. Operates on 3 C sized Alkaline Batteries. it cylindrically shaped, about 4 iches in disameter and about 8 inches high. Weighs about a half a pound. Cost about $25.

 

Seems promising. Package says the light will run for 200 hours on 3 batteries. I tried it out in a darkedn bathroom (about the size of my tent) and it appears to emit plenty of light.

 

Will try it on a campout next month.

 

 

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The bug question is still buggin' me. Let me know if the LED lights tend to attract bugs to you. Thanks!

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Champ:

 

Most any light, but especially white light will attract a wide variety of bugs. When I fish at night, if I need a light, I usually use a propane lantern placed 6-10 feet away from me but placed so that it will light the area I need. That draws the bugs away.

 

One problem with headlights, whether they be LED or other, is that they will tend to attract insects - right around your head.

 

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