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ProScout

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  1. And you would be correct. I withdrew myself from contention, mainly because I was concerned that they were telling me one thing about the time commitments, while everyone outside of there seemed dead-set on the idea that you would be working 80 hours a week (and if so, I can't reasonably do that and still give my own kids the attention they need). It stinks a bit. This is something I keep looking back at and wondering if I should have gone forward with it. As it were, they have finally gotten around to advertising for the job again. It's been open since last July and he was pretty clear that they were taking their time looking for the right person to fill the job. I gathered that they haven't had to turn the position over too terribly often, though the last guy in it apparently got caught in the midst of job searching (and I assume let go). Here's the ad text with specific identifiers redacted: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________XXXXX XXXXX Council, Boy Scouts of America, is accepting resumes for an Executive Staff position. Candidates must have at least a Bachelor's degree along with an outgoing personality and strong communications skills. They must be willing to live and work in either XXXXX, XXXXX, XXXXX or XXXXX. This is an entry-level, professional position that requires day travel and occasional evening commitments. Salary is $36,000 per year plus benefits. Experience in sales, marketing, fundraising, and public speaking is desirable. _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ So there you have it. Are they straight-up lying about the time, because I don't take "occasional" evening commitments to translate into 60-80 hours a week. What am I missing?
  2. This is helpful. I'm thinking more and more that this is not going to be the opportunity for me that I had hoped. Please know that the reason that I am seeking to leave my current job is that it is 60 miles from home, one way. That said, I think patience may be important here in terms of finding the right fit. I have the second interview and personality test tomorrow. I'm going to move forward with it, but unless I hear some earth-changing news, I think I'm going to have to pass. I appreciate everyone's candor on the topic.
  3. ​I was concerned about this so it was one of my first questions. The Council CEO (whom I interviewed with) started out in our district over 30 years ago. He moved up north after a few years where he turned another council around and then ended up back here where he has remained for the last 27 years. He has been courted to go to other councils and do the same work he's done for ours, but has chosen not to. As he told me, very bluntly, they may make you some offers that you may choose to consider, but there is nothing that will make you have to leave if you choose not to. Our family is rooted here, so leaving is really out of the question, at least for the foreseeable future. BSA may WANT me to move, but as I was told, there's nothing they can do to make that happen. Fair assessment. I will ask, for sure. I think it will be good to get the opinions of these other two individuals on Monday and see how they compare to the first interviewer. I agree that it's unlikely I'd want to remain a DE forever, but I will say I'm not looking at this for the salary. It's a good salary to start out and isn't far off what I make now. We can live comfortably with it. My biggest issue is time. I have no problems devoting time to the job. I just want to ensure there is still time for the family as well (and that's where my biggest disconnect is based on what I'm reading).
  4. Good points, qwazse. I will most definitely add those to my list of questions. I'm thinking I'm more likely to not get the offer just based on how inquisitive I will be in this next interview. It isn't often that the interviewee does a more thorough interview than the interviewer, but it's not a bad thing.
  5. qwazse: I understand that the job is not just sales. However, I think you know as well as I do that my job would depend on numbers. That said, a big part of selling in this type of field would involve cultivating solid relationships with my volunteers and working with them and SUPPORTING them to "close" those deals. I obviously can't do it on my own. At the end of the day, they are the ones who are executing what I'm "selling" and maintaining a good relationship with them and keeping myself in their good graces helps me as much as anyone. Also, I think you have a fundamental misconception of what "PR" is. It isn't just maintaining relations with THE public....it's about maintaining relationships with MY public...and the volunteers are a major part of that group. I did not mention the "co-ed talks" because I was not aware of them. It doesn't mean I have an issue with doing them or that I would exclude one program in favor of another (although much of that would be determined by need). Ultimately, I get what you're saying. To be very clear, I have spent the last 12 years working in the hospitality field, primarily in event planning and management. If you've ever done that type of work, then you know that client relationship development is paramount. Approaching situations with humility is a necessity and working to find answers that you may not know (to ensure you're giving the correct information) is commonplace. Believe me when I say, I wouldn't undertake this with arrogance. The first step is to meet with my volunteers and listen to their concerns and their needs, then determine what is within my power to address and how to go about doing it appropriately. If it doesn't fall within my purview, then my goal is to run it up the ladder until I find whose it does. One way or the other, I will not leave my "clients" hanging. If I ever did that in my line of work now, I wouldn't have a job. I'm not the typical "fresh-out-of-school" college grad looking to show off and show up the people around me to move up. I'm looking for a stable career that will allow me to do good within my community....and that means giving the attention needed to those who are on the ground in that community. I hope this helps a bit.
  6. ​I was concerned about this so it was one of my first questions. The Council CEO (whom I interviewed with) started out in our district over 30 years ago. He moved up north after a few years where he turned another council around and then ended up back here where he has remained for the last 27 years. He has been courted to go to other councils and do the same work he's done for ours, but has chosen not to. As he told me, very bluntly, they may make you some offers that you may choose to consider, but there is nothing that will make you have to leave if you choose not to. Our family is rooted here, so leaving is really out of the question, at least for the foreseeable future. BSA may WANT me to move, but as I was told, there's nothing they can do to make that happen.
  7. Good question, blw. As a child, I grew up in the area that I will be serving and participated in Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts from about 6 or 7 years old until I was around 12. Of course, I did all of the normal things and participated in the programs and events offered through Scouting during that time. Since then, I have not had any involvement......we'll say over the last twenty years or so. As I see it, this is most definitely a sales/PR position first and foremost. It is not working with the kids or really being involved at the program execution level. I don't personally see any issues with the number of nights/weekend days that you outlined. All of that would be totally fine. I've just seen so many reviews of the position that make it sound as though you're lucky to be home two nights a week and if that were the case, it would be problematic. And then there's the issue of whether or not this is a high-pressure gig with the goals and such given that you really only have so much you can do to increase the numbers. If I hit every school and do the talks and still find the numbers not coming in, then I'm in the boat of worrying about losing my job (something I can't afford to do). I think there is a ton of potential for this job, especially after the first three years in terms of advancing within my own district or council (and again, I fully intend to remain in my area long-term which I think would prove most beneficial for the volunteers in our district and really growing good relationships with them).
  8. I am in the process of interviewing for a DE position in a very good (perhaps the best, at least as far as awards go) council in the US. I have researched the job about as much as I can on my own and read through many reviews of what other DEs (current and former) have had to say about the job. Realistically, though, I know many of the people who take the time to post such information on the internet do so based on a negative experience and, largely, that's the type of review I have seen for the position thus far. I'm hoping to get some real-world thoughts on the job and a better idea of "a day in the life". My first interview went great and the job seems like a good fit, at least based on what I know of it thus far. The only real concern that I have seen raised is where work/life balance come into play. I am married with children and so this aspect is important to me. I understand the need to be flexible for some night and weekend meetings and events......but how much are we really looking at and during what parts of the year? During slower seasons, what does the day consist of? Of note, I am not one who is looking to advance to national or anything of that nature. If I take this position, I fully expect to stay with it and remain within my area (the same area where my wife and I were born and raised and are very much rooted). I have seen many volunteers complain of their DE's lack of interest in what they were doing and only being focused on moving up; thus, my situation and intent is a bit of a departure from that....and I think it's most likely a good thing. Before I leave a good job to do this, I just want to know what I'm looking at....preferably from those who are there now or have been there recently. I do know that our DEs do the "boy talks" and also man the sign-up nights. I know of some other aspects regarding networking and such, but I'm figuring there has to be a good bit more to the day. Obviously, boy talks can't be the only thing going on year round. What other meetings and tasks (specifically) are involved? Any information will be greatly appreciated!
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