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Mike Long

What to do when older scouts are disobedient.

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I agree you dont "NEED" a uniform to be a scout, but also believe the line in the handbooks is for economically "challenged" families. But that doesnt seem to be the case here.

 

Its tough to argue the economics of scouting uniforms when talking to a scout sporting designer 'shades, skateboard helment, gloves, elbow pads, and knee pads with a specially designed skateboard backpack holding a skateboard that is more technologically advanced then the first car I owned (Studebaker Silverhawk, it was gorgeous thank you)

 

Not that I dont think you need the safety equipment, but the brand new $100 sneakers did me in. I will rail against unform costs as much as anyone (Wal-Mart sells wonderful shorts for less than 20 dollars while Venture Crew Shorts are over 50)but sometimes its time to choose your poison

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Well, after a one week abscence my Scout showed up in uniform last night.

 

We got along famously, like nothing ever happened. I'm very grateful to not lose him.

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Studebaker Silverhawk? And I thought your comments about voting for Nixon (twice) was giving away your age. With each new post, OGE you seem to be getting older and grayer. ;)

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Rooster, it was a work of art, metallic blue with huge fins, a grill that was real chrome, and not painted plastic with little lamps hung on an actual metal bumper for directional signals. A hood that took a grunt or two to hoist up and an engine space that featured a clear look at the ground unobstructed with wires etc.

 

Wonderful "three on the tree" transmission with gauges for oil pressure and amperage and not idiot lights with a toggle switch for the headlights and an infinte number of reclining seat positions. I wish I still had it but I had to sell it when I got married as I could not afford to keep two beauties at one time.

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My son's scoutmaster said that the boys would have to pay a fine (25 cents) every time one of them is caught with his shirt not tucked in at summer camp. Is it OK to fine scouts for infractions?

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Another troop following the program, NOT!

What would happen if the scout refused to pay but tucked his shirt in?

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Hmmm . . . What if the Scout decided to pay the 25 cents and leave his shirt hanging out? There is no price for this. "We're a troop boys. Get with the program. Shirts must be tucked, no exceptions, no excuses!"

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Untucked shirt! Shoot 'em. End of problem!

 

My big pet peeve is hands in the pockets during ceremonies! Drives me nuts!

 

Ed Mori

Scoutmaster

Troop 1

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My simple answer is to bring it up at the Board of Review. He's not living by the Scout Law so he doesn't advance. The parents might not like it but that's tough. If the kid doesn't like it, he has two options -- conform or quit.

 

You might guess that there are many parents in our troop who don't like me and that's fine by me.

 

 

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A JASM may just fit the bill here. One from another troop may visit and just be able to put it in view for the scout. Sometimes the communication gap is too wide from scouter to scout. Here's your bridge. Be careful in your selection and make sure this is the one you want.

The local OA lodge or chapter may be able to help you if a JASM is not available. You should not have a problem with at least the chief or a chief to stress the uniform point. Positive peer pressure and seeing their example works.

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we don't have much of a problem with this, as our standard has always been to wear uniforms - even when our troop was not run by BSA methods - But our troop does not require full uniforms - just uniform shirts.

 

If a boy shows up at a meeting not in uniform, he usually has a reason - just returned from a campout and Mom hasn't washed it yet, he had a school, band, sports or other activity prior to meeting - we don't make much of it, if it is a seldom thing. Most of our boys wear their uniform to all meetings - maybe one or two will show up once in awhile NOT in uniform.

 

When we go on trips, for some reason, we have MORE boys who don't want to wear their uniforms - for some reason we had a couple of boys who didn't want to look "un-cool" by wearing a uniform shirt in public. (though when they are traveling in 50 yr old, big tan and rusty bus with BSA TROOP 159 emblazoned on the side - this logic that the uniforms are "uncool" escapes me...)

 

We established a rule that while traveling all boys and adults MUST wear a uniform shirt - if they show up without it they have 3 choices -

 

1.go home and get it

2.wear one from the troops "retired shirt" collection

3. stay home

 

EVen I have been sent home to get my shirt by the SM! (on a winter day outing when it couldn't be seen anyway!) but i fully agreed with the logic of it, and have never not worn it again!

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LauraT7

 

This is not meant to be judgemental, but you say that your standard has always been to wear uniforms. It seems that your scouts aren't wearing the uniform if they only wear the shirts. The whole point of wearing the uniform is for all to be the same and to be an outward sign of trust. According to the handbook, that includes shirt, pants, socks, belt and buckle. Neckerchief and cap are optional.

Some posters mentioned pet peeves. These is mine; untucked shirts, shirts only, and patches worn incorrectly.

Why go halfway?

We provide scouts with a hanger at the back of the scout room to keep their uniform. They get there early and put their uniform on. We also ask the boys to plan ahead if they have a prior engagement so they will have their uniform in the car. Our adult leaders are the example because most come right from work and all have complete uniforms. They have to learn responsibility at some point.

Oh, whats this about the Mom's not having washed the uniform? Make the scout responsible for cleaning the uniform. Mom's don't need to be used as excuses. If the Mom hasn't taught the boy to wash clothes, it may be a good field trip to go to the laundrymat and have a skills session.

Doug

 

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I'm glad things worked out, Mike. It's tough coming into a bad situation and performing major surgery to save the patient.

 

It helps to make sure all parties know it isn't YOUR rules, regulations, and procedures, but Scouting's. They signed up for the program, right? Would they show up for a baseball/football/soccer game without being suited-up? Would they be allowed to play in their preferred costume verses the sport uniform? Or, if they're in band, how far are they going to get without a uniform or maintaining their instrument?

 

Respect isn't a reward for seniority, it's earned. A uniform is a statement about your commitment, no matter what program. It's visible evidence about your dedication and preparedness. Don't wear the uniform? It begs the question: what else is optional, in your (the boy's) opinion? Having proper clothing and shoes for a hike? How about bringing a map and compass? Canteen? And, are you part of the group, or are you just visiting or passing through? It's been my experience that such outward signs, such as not wearing the uniform, are preliminary to dropping the ball in other areas.

 

I've found that peer pressure helps with this sort of thing. When there are real and attainable rewards for a patrol to be the 'best' (and uniforms are part of the competition), then its members care a great deal about such issues. Camporees help with this. In-troop competitions are also useful.

 

I have some admiration for the young man in question, that he was finally able to see the situation clearly, and willing and able to change. This is tough, especially as elevated as it had become. Don't forget to remind him how much you appreciate him.(This message has been edited by Compass)

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