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ScoutMomAng

Crossed over to scouts & Parents concerned about Patrols

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Kenk,

When the boys cross over as a den they have a built in support group of peers with them. They all experience the same things at the same time. It always helps to have a friend to go through a new experience with. My son was a bit timid, yet with a group of school friends with him, he has done quite well. Of the 6 boys that crossed over with him, 5 are left in the troop. They have all attained Life scout rank. They also run the troop as SPL, ASPL and JASM and Troop Guides. Along with a Troop guide helping the NSP, the older guys mentor the new scouts usually without either scout knowing it. If you have several troops in your area visit as many as possible as soon as possible. Start this summer if possible. See how they operate and how active they are.

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Kenk,

 

My 7 boys were exposed to many troops in our area. Actually they were exposed to 4 of 5 local troops. The boys were given the opportunity to make their own decisions. Low and behold, they all chose to stay together on their own. They are not by any means "best" friends outside the den. They don't play at each others houses and only see each other at school (some in the same classes, most are not and do not have recess here for 5th graders) or den meetings and scout activities. They all chose the same troop. One originally had chosen to go to a different troop but later, due to circumstances, chose to go with the other boys. I think they talk among themselves (maybe telepathically even).

 

I came through the last three years with several of these boys and I'm a proud mother hen to see them go onward but am also heartbroken that they will no longer be with me in my den. I love the Webelos level!

 

The boys had a "lock-in" at the scout hut this past weekend with their new troop and all 7 boys have earned their scout and are working toward their Tenderfoot! So short a time and already progressing through ranks! I'm happy and sad at the same time. My boy is no longer a baby!!!

 

Ang

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starwolfmom said something that caught my eye, and that was (paraphrasing) that the transistion from Cub Scouting to Boy Scouting can be hard on micromanaging parents.

 

Soooooo true..

 

I am finding that more and more. We just had a group of graduated Webelos come to the Troop. Most of the parents contiue to question everything I do as a Scoutmaster.

We went on a campout a couple weeks after they all crossed over. The parents were floored when I told the Scouts to tell me what they wanted to eat and then when we got out to the camp site they actually had to cook (with supervision of older Scouts).

I am a firm believer in trial and error. I do not think you can learn to ride a bike by reading about it... you must get on the bike and ride. Same with camping and Scout skills. There is no place to learn Scout skills like camping.

But some micromanaging over protective parents need to see the result, and thats fine. The NSP is a great idea and allows the new Scout to make those mistakes in the group he has more than likely spent the last 4 years with rather than feeling the pressure of older Scouts hovering over them.

 

Jerry

Scoutmaster

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Jerry ... at least you get questioned about everything that you do. How about having one of the new parents at the new parent meeting ask you this question,"How would an adult leader be removed from his position?" All of the scoutmasters and I were at a lost for words. I simply replied, "Any one of us standing up here can be replaced at any time. The new scoutmasters will need to be approved by the COR and we are more than willing to relinguish our posts."

 

The funny thing is that this gentleman has not dipped his hands in helping his son's Den nor Pack during Cub years! I think that I actually saw him at a Pack meeting four times in 4.5 years At the Pack's campout, you'll find him swing his golf club instead of doing the activities with his son. Oh well ... as I told him, the scoutmasters and I all have a lengthy list of "honey-do's" that we can be doing.

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Onehour-

First of all great screen name...are you sure you should not put a multiply sign after that (haha)

 

Yeah I geuss I am lucky- no one has asked from my head or job yet.

I think next time I will simply ask one of the Dads (or Moms) coming up with the new Scouts to the New Scout Patrol ASM. Then they can really get a first hand look at the Patrol Method and see what they are doing. That should make them feel more comfortable about what is going on.

 

You know it is funny too that the loudest opposition always comes from the person with the least amount of blisters.

I am with you!

 

 

YIS

Jerry

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I put together a Power Point briefing of the differences between Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts that I give to all new parents. If anyone wants a copy send me a personal email and I'll shoot it to you.

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Our troop is currently experiencing problems with the next step of Web->NBP transition.

 

Four webelos crossed over last fall and have done very well. We formed a New Boy Patrol for them, the Troop Guide did a wonderful job, the ASM assigned to the NBP was there to help. The 4 boys are doing great, they are all at least Tenderfoot, two are Second Class; and they all have at least one Merit Badge.

 

It is time to start thinking about disbanding their patrol: aye, there's the rub.

 

The four new boys are fast friends and are not too keen on being broken up. Their parents are all against it too (they are all a touch over protective of their boys). Part of me questions how much of the boys' parents' opinions are influencing the boys' own feelings.

 

I do admit, the 4 do work well together. But how do we (the Scouters) not only convince the parents that this is the right thing to do, but to convince the 4 boys as well?

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I would have the scouts read page 16 in the handbook.

Which says

Your patrol is a team of good freinds working together to make things happen.

And them explain to them that you are going to split them up, please tell us how that works for you.

Also have them read the Trailhead chapter in the handbook.

I would suggets that you read the SM handbook, which explains how patrols grow. It has nothing to do with adult leaders deicding who is going to be in a patrol, after the New scout patrol.

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Here's a rule of thumb: When you see some confusion, a bit of dirt up in the air, etc., that is GOOD. A BOY is in charge of the activity. When you see order, calm, and real progress being made, that is BAD. An ADULT is in charge of the activity. Remember: BOY-lead program.

 

What really has me see lots of red flags go up is a mom of a Webelo coming into the troop asking (I kid you not), "Which other boys are going to be in my son's patrol and which other boys are in the troop?" I give her a current troop roster and let her decide for herself. Eight out of ten times the boy wants to stay with his den mates.

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Barry, do your existing patrols have any say in how this happens? If not, has this ever caused you any problems?

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Let me add my support to a couple of Proud Eagle's points by serving as a negative example.

 

My son's troop has NOT assigned an ASM to the New Scout Patrol in the past. Although a Troop Guide was appointed, they either were inadequately trained or inadequately advised. As a result, first-year Scouts experienced a very disappointing, non-productive year. I believe this was due to a too-strong belief in "letting the boys do it." A boy may learn to swim by being thrown into the swimming hole, but that doesn't make it the best way to learn. Some instruction and guidance by adults is needed. I agree most strongly that an NSP ASM is needed, as are WELL TRAINED Troop Guides.

 

 

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>>Barry, do your existing patrols have any say in how this happens? If not, has this ever caused you any problems?

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