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KoreaScouter

Have you done TJLT "campouts"

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Have any of you done your TJLT as a "campout", with model patrol campsites (including cooksite standards), PLCs, model patrol meetings, principles of skill instruction, etc.?

 

I know we've had other threads on JLT, but I'm interested in knowing if any of you have gone beyond the theoretical to the applied. And, without the distractions of having the entire Troop there.

 

thanks,

 

KS

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We attempted a JLT at last year's BSA 101. Ended up needing the older boys to help out with new boys, so TJLT was put on hold.

 

It depends is how big is the troop, how many would boys are doing JLT and how many are non-JLT.

If you have a big Troop then do TJLT campout seperate. If it's a small troop then have the whole troop there. Just have something planned for the non-JLT guys.

 

Above are my opinions.

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I've seen troops take just the JLT guys on the campout. They'll call it a leadership retreat or something like that. There's an advantage to getting the boys completely away from all distractions. The only problem is that the effort of camping & cooking can then become a distraction. Using cabins, such as the ones at our scout camp, which has electrical outlets for the TV, is another good option.

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Hi KS

 

I've done a few of these as well as lockins, and indoor overnights and other ideas as well. We found that the scouts enjoyed indoor overnight TJLTs more than outdoor because they already camp at least once a month and like something a little different. My goal was to create an environment that encourage the scouts to focus on the JLT lessons being taught. Running a TJLT required a lot of time from older scouts and adults, so we looked for the most bang for our buck and two days indoors turnout to give us what we wanted.

 

I think the ideal campsite, knots and lashings, cooking and KP are scout skills, not leadership skills. If there is a real problem with the patrols not understanding or using scout skills correctly, then it is appropriate to include that in leadership training (TJLT). But so many times I have watch troop focus too much on teaching scout skills at TJLT instead of leadership skills not really understanding the difference.

 

Our Council JLTC is modeled a little from our Troop experience. The staff does the cooking and the scouts are set up in cabins. We found patrols spend about four hours or more a day jsut cooking and KP. By taking the basic patrol responsibilities out of the program, we now fill those hours with leadership Development training. It allowed us to shorten the course by three days and cut the course cost to $50 per participant hoping to bring more scouts to the program. Our council has seen it as a big success so far and I know it was at least being looked at by National.

 

Have a great scouting day.

 

Barry

 

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I just recently finished a TJLT it was our 1st in about 4 years. We did it at our normal meeting place. Doing it during an outing would be nice but I dont think the participation would have been as high

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We have done indoor, "lock-in" style TJLTs for a number of years and planned a TJLT campout a couple of weeks ago - to do something different. We were unfortunately hammered by some monsoon rains and our campsite was flooded, so we were indoors again. The guys were looking forward to camping with just the older troop leadership and have asked if we can have a leadership campout sometime in the near future to make up for the one we missed. I must say I was pretty disappointed in the wash-out. There's nothing like the quiet conversation around a campfire late in the evening to reflect on the day's discussions in more depth.

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I know there's a built-in tradeoff when you take some of the time at a JLT campout for the youth leaders to set up camp and do some camp chores. What I'm thinking, though, is that if there is already a model patrol campsite set up when they get there, to include the patrol box/kitchen, it'll show them what right looks like. If you put the green bars into temporary patrols, you can rotate the "PL" responsibility among them for various activities. Ditto for the SPL/ASPL. Then, as the leadership lessons teach things like delegation, duty rosters, attention to detail, and followup (to name a few), they'll all have opportunities to apply them in outdoor settings and situations they'll actually face. I'm thinking we could do several patrol meetings, with each of them taking turns leading it, using the meeting agenda in the PL Handbook. Ditto for the PLC, with the SPL running one and the ASPL running one. Tie the lessons into practical applications right after they learn them, even if there's some simulation involved.

 

I don't have this all sorted out, of course, which is why I asked for your ideas. For example, I don't know how to let them do menu planning at camp, unless somebody's got their car warmed up and ready to run to the store. Some of this is a head-scratcher, but I want to find a way to give the Green Bars practical, hands-on applications of what we teach them, as soon as possible after they learn it, in a controlled environment...

 

KS

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What you just described is basically the present JLTC. It's a good idea and when you work the kinks out, you will have a good TJLT program.

 

I'm not saying it's wrong or that it won't work because we ran something like what you're talking aobut. I am saying that you should train where the troop is weak. I like to tell SPLs at JLTC that when planning their next TJLT, look at the PL Handbook and find the areas of program where the troop is weak. Look at the SPL Handbook and find the areas where leadership is weak. Build your TJLT on those areas.

 

If I may pass a little more of my experience. When you are planning the TJLT weekend, be cautious of how the weekend flows. Are you driving the scouts to follow the agenda exacally as it is planned, or are you allowing the lessons learned along the way propelle the scouts to the next agenda item. We found JLT courses where the staff pushes the agenda minute by minute make the the participants feel they are only spectators watching the course instead of particpating in the experience.

 

I wish you luck KS because I've been where you are at and I really enjoy my experiences working with the scouts developing the program. I look forward to reading your post from the experience.

 

I love this scouting stuff.

 

Barry

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Whether done as a a day activity, overnight lock-in or campout it is meant to be done only with the unit leaders anticipated leaders. If you have a small troop that might be everyone. But it is not intended as a large group activity. It works best in a group of 12 or less in order for everyone to garner the anticipated benefits.

 

Anytime an adult leader allows a scout to make the decision on "the next step" then he has gone from the theoretical to the applied.

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I didn't realize my idea was that similar to JLTC as you've seen it. Our council has JLTC scheduled in June; I'm going to check with them and find out if it follows that model, too. I might be trying to reinvent the wheel here...

 

I agree that training efforts should be focused where you need the most improvement. However, that focus may be on completely different things, depending on the leadership team you get each time you conduct Troop elections. Maybe that's another argument for a dynamic, modular youth training curriculum.

 

Thanks for your ideas and input...

 

KS

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>>depending on the leadership team you get each time you conduct Troop elections. Maybe that's another argument for a dynamic, modular youth training curriculum.

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Hello Korea Dude,

 

I switched to the campout method of TJLT last year and have run three sessions. I created a program using the JLT material, NJLTC from Philmont and Wood Badge.

 

It's been successful for our troop. Here's the basic blueprint. The whole weekend is planned out minute by minute. The SPL is given a peek at the "next event" only a little before it happens, much like in Wood Badge. The Leadership is divided into patrols, and with my troop it's been two patrols: North and South. On Friday night after arriving at camp the patrols are created, a leader elected and they are given the assignment to pitch camp, come up with a patrol name, yell, song, flag and a skit for the campfire. I give them each a flag kit consisting of material, pens, etc. We hold an opening campfire around 9:30 pm.

 

Being an expert cook and cooking is my hobby and passion, I cook for the weekend so the boys and adults aren't preoccupied by that activity. It works well and the boys appreciate my fare.

 

We conduct a variety of team building exercises, Scouting history lectures and role playing to get them prepared for the main event, which is the 6-month planning session. We rotate patrol leaders like in Wood Badge, every 4 hours or so during the weekend. They never see the schedule, rather, it is given to them during 5-minute PLC meetings after the new PL is selected.

 

One event that is a lot of fun occurs early Saturday morning. The boys are awakened at 7am and the PL's are told that breakfast is at 8. It's already cooking and the campsite smells great. The PL's are told that they camped in the wrong spot and they must pack up and relocate across the road in a new campsite. They have 45 minutes to complete this task.

 

I don't know about your troops, but getting my boys to break camp in an hour is a challenge, much less break camp, relocate and set up a new camp in 45 minutes. Yet in the 3 times I've done this exercise, the boys have succeeded with time to spare.

 

This is right out of Philmont where you learn to set up camp and break camp very quickly.

 

Finally, let me say that the only time I've had my leadership actually rapt with attention is when I discussed Baden-Powells early life and how Scouting was derived from his experiences in Africa. The boys hang on every word. However, as a leader, you must read everything you can about Baden-Powell before doing this, especially Tim Jeal's book.

 

The boys have become pumped for leadership. I have 55 boys in my troop and 30 in leadership positions. Yes, I make a lot of use of Troop Guides, Den Chiefs and Instructors. I also created a position I call NJLT Advisor to encourage our Philmont trained scouts to contribute.

 

It only takes an hour a week!

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