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Pushups

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Yah, Sentinel947, welcome to da forums! My role around here often is to pull things back toward the middle, or just play devil's advocate.;) Some, however, would say that despite my cute, furry name my role is just to be annoyin'. :)

 

In that spirit, then, let me ask: Why do yeh think that doin' pushups will "cause resentment", but givin' a lad a "talking to" (or other form of consequence) won't cause resentment? I know plenty of lads (and even more young ladies) who bore resentments for what they felt was an unfair "talking to" for years, and plenty of lads made to do push ups who bore no resentment at all.

 

I think you're foolin' yourself. Just as I think fred8033 is foolin' himself if he feels that makin' a boy do the dishes is goin' to magically be "constructive". It's "constructive" in his family, because within his family there's a much different and longer term relationship in play, eh? Without that relationship, it's just some [bleep] of an adult makin' a boy do a chore because da [bleep] [bleep] of an adult is on a power trip and is too lazy to do da chore by herself. ;)

 

Beavah

 

 

 

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What approach works in a situation depends on the adult and the kid in question. In my experience in Scouting there hasn't been a catch all, silver bullet to every solution. Most of my experience is from the Scout side of things.

 

Some kids won't respond to any sort of discipline or punishments, and simply require time to grow up.

 

Brevah, I'm sure some kids do respond positively to push ups or other physical punishments, it's enduring use in multiple organizations would be a testament to such a method. But I don't think you quite understood what I meant, so perhaps I should explain myself more clearly.

 

And you raised an excellent point. Words are just as strong as actions. If a talk with a Scout isn't done the right way, it certainly will cause resentment from the Scout, because they will feel they are being unfairly chastised.

 

Some adults simply cannot talk to a Teenager without chastising, accusing, and insinuating something. Being 18 years old. I don't have that problem. Children don't FEEL like children. They expect to be treated like an adult, even when their actions do not warrant such treatment.

 

What happens if you tell a kid to do push-ups and he doesn't do it? What would be the next step?(This message has been edited by Sentinel947)

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What happens if you tell a kid to do push-ups and he doesn't do it? What would be the next step?

 

What happens if yeh tell a kid to do the dishes and he doesn't? What happens if yeh "talk to" a lad and he ignores you? :)

 

I reckon da problem is the same no matter what consequence yeh choose. If it doesn't work, yeh try a different consequence.

 

B

 

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Good points Beavah.. had some problems like this at Summer Camp last week. Boys not wanted to do the right thing. even a boy telling me he wasn't going to do something, I couldn't make him, and he was going to tell his dad.. I offered my phone to him..

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I have made a kid do 10 pushups once after I heard him insult another. There was a time in my troop when I was a scout where we fought and insulted eachother all the time and it represented us very negatively. I do not wish for that time to happen again. At this particular instance we were on a backpacking trip and as we were setting up camp I heard a scout call another "gay". So I went over to have a talk with them about calling names, when I actually witnessed him still calling others gay. So I told him to come here and simply told him to "get on all fours, now spread your feet out behind you, now go down and up 10 times for me." I then sat everybody down and explained to them about this dark time in the troop before they came where everybody was insulting and fighting eachother and how I didn't want that time to come back. The other assistant scoutmaster agreed that we were definitely not going to have that. The boys understood well and the boy in question agreed that he was in the wrong. I've made one boy to a tree and back a few short yards away a couple of times, really he was hyper, and we were leaving so I wanted to tire him out before he got in my car. When playing there are usually problems with keeping their hands to themselves, so usually just a warning or two about running around the building will suffice.

 

However, physical exercise is not my favorite punishment. As I have said I do it rarely. My favorite punishment is after the meeting I have them stay after, I ask them to say the scout oath, then the scout law, then I ask if they have been any of those that night, they usually say no (if I have to resort to this, they haven't.) They then apologise and I explain that if they become that disruptive again I will have to have a talk with their parents.

 

I say when used right, physical punishment works, but remember that this is not football or the military. Have your scouts obey you, but also have them remember you in a good way.

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I have made a kid do 10 pushups once after I heard him insult another. There was a time in my troop when I was a scout where we fought and insulted eachother all the time and it represented us very negatively. I do not wish for that time to happen again. At this particular instance we were on a backpacking trip and as we were setting up camp I heard a scout call another "gay". So I went over to have a talk with them about calling names, when I actually witnessed him still calling others gay. So I told him to come here and simply told him to "get on all fours, now spread your feet out behind you, now go down and up 10 times for me." I then sat everybody down and explained to them about this dark time in the troop before they came where everybody was insulting and fighting eachother and how I didn't want that time to come back. The other assistant scoutmaster agreed that we were definitely not going to have that. The boys understood well and the boy in question agreed that he was in the wrong. I've made one boy to a tree and back a few short yards away a couple of times, really he was hyper, and we were leaving so I wanted to tire him out before he got in my car. When playing there are usually problems with keeping their hands to themselves, so usually just a warning or two about running around the building will suffice.

 

However, physical exercise is not my favorite punishment. As I have said I do it rarely. My favorite punishment is after the meeting I have them stay after, I ask them to say the scout oath, then the scout law, then I ask if they have been any of those that night, they usually say no (if I have to resort to this, they haven't.) They then apologise and I explain that if they become that disruptive again I will have to have a talk with their parents.

 

I say when used right, physical punishment works, but remember that this is not football or the military. Have your scouts obey you, but also have them remember you in a good way.

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I have made a kid do 10 pushups once after I heard him insult another. There was a time in my troop when I was a scout where we fought and insulted eachother all the time and it represented us very negatively. I do not wish for that time to happen again. At this particular instance we were on a backpacking trip and as we were setting up camp I heard a scout call another "gay". So I went over to have a talk with them about calling names, when I actually witnessed him still calling others gay. So I told him to come here and simply told him to "get on all fours, now spread your feet out behind you, now go down and up 10 times for me." I then sat everybody down and explained to them about this dark time in the troop before they came where everybody was insulting and fighting eachother and how I didn't want that time to come back. The other assistant scoutmaster agreed that we were definitely not going to have that. The boys understood well and the boy in question agreed that he was in the wrong. I've made one boy to a tree and back a few short yards away a couple of times, really he was hyper, and we were leaving so I wanted to tire him out before he got in my car. When playing there are usually problems with keeping their hands to themselves, so usually just a warning or two about running around the building will suffice.

 

However, physical exercise is not my favorite punishment. As I have said I do it rarely. My favorite punishment is after the meeting I have them stay after, I ask them to say the scout oath, then the scout law, then I ask if they have been any of those that night, they usually say no (if I have to resort to this, they haven't.) They then apologise and I explain that if they become that disruptive again I will have to have a talk with their parents.

 

I say when used right, physical punishment works, but remember that this is not football or the military. Have your scouts obey you, but also have them remember you in a good way.

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I have made a kid do 10 pushups once after I heard him insult another. There was a time in my troop when I was a scout where we fought and insulted eachother all the time and it represented us very negatively. I do not wish for that time to happen again. At this particular instance we were on a backpacking trip and as we were setting up camp I heard a scout call another "gay". So I went over to have a talk with them about calling names, when I actually witnessed him still calling others gay. So I told him to come here and simply told him to "get on all fours, now spread your feet out behind you, now go down and up 10 times for me." I then sat everybody down and explained to them about this dark time in the troop before they came where everybody was insulting and fighting eachother and how I didn't want that time to come back. The other assistant scoutmaster agreed that we were definitely not going to have that. The boys understood well and the boy in question agreed that he was in the wrong. I've made one boy to a tree and back a few short yards away a couple of times, really he was hyper, and we were leaving so I wanted to tire him out before he got in my car. When playing there are usually problems with keeping their hands to themselves, so usually just a warning or two about running around the building will suffice.

 

However, physical exercise is not my favorite punishment. As I have said I do it rarely. My favorite punishment is after the meeting I have them stay after, I ask them to say the scout oath, then the scout law, then I ask if they have been any of those that night, they usually say no (if I have to resort to this, they haven't.) They then apologise and I explain that if they become that disruptive again I will have to have a talk with their parents.

 

I say when used right, physical punishment works, but remember that this is not football or the military. Have your scouts obey you, but also have them remember you in a good way.

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I have made a kid do 10 pushups once after I heard him insult another. There was a time in my troop when I was a scout where we fought and insulted eachother all the time and it represented us very negatively. I do not wish for that time to happen again. At this particular instance we were on a backpacking trip and as we were setting up camp I heard a scout call another "gay". So I went over to have a talk with them about calling names, when I actually witnessed him still calling others gay. So I told him to come here and simply told him to "get on all fours, now spread your feet out behind you, now go down and up 10 times for me." I then sat everybody down and explained to them about this dark time in the troop before they came where everybody was insulting and fighting eachother and how I didn't want that time to come back. The other assistant scoutmaster agreed that we were definitely not going to have that. The boys understood well and the boy in question agreed that he was in the wrong. I've made one boy to a tree and back a few short yards away a couple of times, really he was hyper, and we were leaving so I wanted to tire him out before he got in my car. When playing there are usually problems with keeping their hands to themselves, so usually just a warning or two about running around the building will suffice.

 

However, physical exercise is not my favorite punishment. As I have said I do it rarely. My favorite punishment is after the meeting I have them stay after, I ask them to say the scout oath, then the scout law, then I ask if they have been any of those that night, they usually say no (if I have to resort to this, they haven't.) They then apologise and I explain that if they become that disruptive again I will have to have a talk with their parents.

 

I say when used right, physical punishment works, but remember that this is not football or the military. Have your scouts obey you, but also have them remember you in a good way.

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I have made a kid do 10 pushups once after I heard him insult another. There was a time in my troop when I was a scout where we fought and insulted eachother all the time and it represented us very negatively. I do not wish for that time to happen again. At this particular instance we were on a backpacking trip and as we were setting up camp I heard a scout call another "gay". So I went over to have a talk with them about calling names, when I actually witnessed him still calling others gay. So I told him to come here and simply told him to "get on all fours, now spread your feet out behind you, now go down and up 10 times for me." I then sat everybody down and explained to them about this dark time in the troop before they came where everybody was insulting and fighting eachother and how I didn't want that time to come back. The other assistant scoutmaster agreed that we were definitely not going to have that. The boys understood well and the boy in question agreed that he was in the wrong. I've made one boy to a tree and back a few short yards away a couple of times, really he was hyper, and we were leaving so I wanted to tire him out before he got in my car. When playing there are usually problems with keeping their hands to themselves, so usually just a warning or two about running around the building will suffice.

 

However, physical exercise is not my favorite punishment. As I have said I do it rarely. My favorite punishment is after the meeting I have them stay after, I ask them to say the scout oath, then the scout law, then I ask if they have been any of those that night, they usually say no (if I have to resort to this, they haven't.) They then apologise and I explain that if they become that disruptive again I will have to have a talk with their parents.

 

I say when used right, physical punishment works, but remember that this is not football or the military. Have your scouts obey you, but also have them remember you in a good way.

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I have made a kid do 10 pushups once after I heard him insult another. There was a time in my troop when I was a scout where we fought and insulted eachother all the time and it represented us very negatively. I do not wish for that time to happen again. At this particular instance we were on a backpacking trip and as we were setting up camp I heard a scout call another "gay". So I went over to have a talk with them about calling names, when I actually witnessed him still calling others gay. So I told him to come here and simply told him to "get on all fours, now spread your feet out behind you, now go down and up 10 times for me." I then sat everybody down and explained to them about this dark time in the troop before they came where everybody was insulting and fighting eachother and how I didn't want that time to come back. The other assistant scoutmaster agreed that we were definitely not going to have that. The boys understood well and the boy in question agreed that he was in the wrong. I've made one boy to a tree and back a few short yards away a couple of times, really he was hyper, and we were leaving so I wanted to tire him out before he got in my car. When playing there are usually problems with keeping their hands to themselves, so usually just a warning or two about running around the building will suffice.

 

However, physical exercise is not my favorite punishment. As I have said I do it rarely. My favorite punishment is after the meeting I have them stay after, I ask them to say the scout oath, then the scout law, then I ask if they have been any of those that night, they usually say no (if I have to resort to this, they haven't.) They then apologise and I explain that if they become that disruptive again I will have to have a talk with their parents.

 

I say when used right, physical punishment works, but remember that this is not football or the military. Have your scouts obey you, but also have them remember you in a good way.

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Echo. Echo. Echo. :)

 

Thanks for your thoughtful post post post though, youngmaster! Now we'll see if it creates a thread resurrection!

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Ok, Youngmaster, drop and give us 10 - we don't use language like that around here. Just imagine the havoc around here if everyone used the word "sorry".

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I have Bears and Wolves. One of my Wolves is quite the talker. He would interrupt the beginning of meets as we went over old and new business. One day i told him to come to the front and tell us a story. He did, and after a 5 - 7 minute story about whatever came into his head he was good. Now we start our meetings with "Story Time with Seth." We all enjoy it. Guess you just kind of gotta find their motivations. Obviously he wanted some attention.

Sometimes we do push-ups. But we all do them. Sit-ups too. Gotta get that energy out.

 

Yours in Cheerful Service,

Tim

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