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KC9DDI

Help identifying Scouting painting

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Hello All - Several years ago I noticed a particular Scouting-themed painting that I rather liked. I have no idea who the artist is, what it's called, or where/if I could find a print to purchase.

 

I managed to find the image on a troop's website: http://bcn.boulder.co.us/community/scouts/troop61/t6197octthe.htm

 

Does anyone happen to have any information on this particular piece of art? I'd like to potentially acquire a print, but don't know where to start looking...

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SHOOT I know the title and can't think!!!!!!!

 

Norman Rockwell is the artist. If someone doesn't answer before I get home, when I go into my sons' room, I'll tell ya. Oldest got a framed version of it in the room.

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Awesome, thanks for the quick replies. I thought it was a Rockwell, but I wasn't sure. It seems like one of his less well-known works then (apparently he has another entitled "A Scout is Loyal" featuring Abe Lincoln and George Washington.) Also it looks like eBay has a few available.

 

Thanks again!

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"A Scout is Loyal 1932" used as a calendar illustration for one of Brown and Bigelows Scouting calendars (the one for 1932). I tend to believe Norman Rockwell did all the illustrations for that year's calendar - illustrating a different Law each month

Also, thru courtesy of Brown & Bigelow, served as cover for Boys Life magazine February 1932

Norman Rockwell also did a later "Scout is Loyal" in the 60s or 70s that is different.

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"I tend to believe Norman Rockwell did all the illustrations for that year's calendar - illustrating a different Law each month."

 

No, not how it worked.

 

We think of today's calenders, in which each month a different picture is shown.

 

With the B&B calenders (and many of the day), there was only ONE illustration, and you tore off each month.

 

Rockwell only did 1 scout calender painting each year, not 12.

 

 

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Thanks for th info.

The "A Scout is Loyal" I thought from the 60s or 70s was a re-issue of the 1942 version.

Interesting how the Scout in the 1932 version is practicing ultralight backpacking

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KC9DDI I handle the clearing out of estates and Ia m doing one currently for a friend of mine and she just sent me a picture of what appears to be the painting you describe. I have not looked at it in person yet-but found your post while researching it. Did you ever find the piece you were looking for? Again- I am not sure how old or if this is a print or a painting- I will say based on the other items I have received from her mother in laws estate she probably had this in the 60's. I know the original was for a calender 1932. If you have any other information that would be helpful i am all ears.. I will take better pics once I have the piece on hand. Thanks

 

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Apparently there are two paintings called A Scout Is Loyal. One was painted in 1932 and one was in 1942. The one you are looking at was done in 1932. The later one has a scout standing facing forward holding a hat, with Washington and Lincoln standing behind him and an eagle off to the side. I like the first one more than the second.

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As noted, it is available on eBay. It was one of the pieces put out by National Supply in Rockwell prints. Big challenge is getting it at a conservative price. Good luck.

 

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The original painting would be worth millions if it's not already in the BSA Museum or the Rockwell Museum in Massachusetts.http://www.nrm.org/apprints/?p=206

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