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jaandlynn

Tree identification

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I'm an eagle scout (1986) and going to be a new scout leader. does anyone know a good tree id guide? i know the peterson's guides are out there but i'm looking for something mobile. i ran across TreeID and Northwoods field guides for the iPhone. Anyone know anything about them?

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Field guides on the iPhone. Man do I feel old. I will be interested to hear what others say but you may end up educating us on this one.

 

BTW: Welcome to the camp fire.

 

Hal

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"Master Tree Finder" by May Theilgaard Watts, pub. by Nature Study Guild c.1963, but I have seen a reprint more recently. Pocket size , literally 3" by 5". Organizes trees by leaf shape and size, then bark type. Lists by ecological niche, (swampy, uplands, etc.)too. Nice field guide for North American Trees.

I also recommend the Arbor Day Foundation. www.arborday.org Online tree ID section.

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^^

I second that version. It is in-depth enough for a good knowledge of trees and with the pocket size its very portable.

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Another option is tree sort cards. I got a set from Forestry Suppliers. The cards have holes punched in them for various tree and leaf characteristics. Take the deck and identify one feature, e.g.: simple vs. compound leaf. Poke a wire through the appropriate hole and shake the deck and the cards are sorted into two stacks - one of simple-leafed trees, one of compound-leafed. Repeat with another characteristic until you've eliminated all but one and that's your tree.

 

In addition to being accurate, it's a fun learning tool for boys to use.

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I prefer a more simple guide.

 

If you can, find a guide specific to your region. Our state forestry service publishes a guide of common forest trees that is really good. It includes about 150 trees common to the area. It includes a drawing of the leaves, branch structure and fruit, if any, and a map showing the range of the tree. It also has a good description of all the other characteristics of the tree.

 

I find the omnibus guides too much, especially when working with Scouts. I really don't need a book with all 87 subspecies of the Asian yarrow.

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I second TwoCub. Get regional guide.

I grew up in Georgia and never saw a familiar tree in Washington.

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