Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
DeanRx

Is there ANYTHING a scout is ALLOWED to do anymore ?!?!?

Recommended Posts

You know, I have a general kind of concern, and it's not motivated by my politics, although certainly one can say it has political import: but I AM concerned about allowing boys to be boys and allowing boys to do boy things. I AM concerned about the possible over-neutering of boys (and girls) at the behest of a neutralist approach to children, one based on a feminist or liberal perspective.

 

I say this as someone who is fairly moderate. I don't like seeing liberal ideologues running things, nor conservative ideologues.

 

But perhaps in the end, it's all just overworry and overparenting. Perhaps if people had more children in their families, that would smooth out some of these agitations and concerns.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what is interesting is that from what I observe the boys with the most manly men as fathers seem to have the least manly sons, which is interesting.

 

I dont think using the term boys will be boys to justify bad behavior is good. Lets be honest with statistics the way they are, it is just a given that probably at least one in 10 or less boys you know or who are in scouting will end up being gay. And so what.

 

At the beginning of this year my son said that a certain boy was gay. (this is a 7 year old) I asked why he said this and he said another boy said it because this boy hugged another boy. I went through what gay really means (nothing sexual) and just like when kids get "the talk" the next question was whats for dinner.

 

Its not abour making your kids what you want them to be, its about nurturing their talents. Whether they want to be a motocross driver or a fashion designer, we need to be there to encourage them along the way and expose them to great fun and challenges, which scouting will help with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Its not abour making your kids what you want them to be, its about nurturing their talents."

 

There are plenty of talented people that don't live by the scout oath and law or any other similar code of ethic.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is why I think family involvement is important. I want to make sure that whatever is being discussed and taught to my boy is something I know about and agree with. If I dont agree with it, I will freely give my kids my opinions on it.

 

We all do our best to teach our kids. Also I feel that there are many aspects of scouting that are subject to interpretation. And as to ethics, that is also a personal/family issue. Things I consider ethical you may not, and things I consider unethical you may consider ethical.

 

I think its unethical/immoral that Brittany Spears mom wrote a book about parenting and considers herself a good religious person. I consider it unethical that a neighbor of mine considers it not important for her numerous kids to go to college, but critical they go to church numerous times per week. I consider it unethical immoral to go to church and hear the words, but in action not apply these concepts.

 

And my kids pretty much know all of these opinions. Especially my middle schooler.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scout Mom: we may just be quibbling over different shades of gray, or we may have genuine disagreement. I am leery of the word "nurturing", having been "nurtered" as a boy. . . in the end, it was all rather directionless, a boat without a guide or rudder. One day you're a great painter, the next a world-class poet, then a major league scientist. What does it add up to?

 

Oh, I'm being a bit rhetorical here. But I'm apprehensive of just generally "being there" for young Johnny. The secret part about being an adult is that. . . you KNOW BETTER! As a parent, I make it a rule never to substitute my son's judgment for my own.

 

Here's a case in point. My younger sister felt ambiguous about going out for a sport when she was a high school freshman. I strongly encouraged her. Strongly. Years later, she told me it was one of her best HS experiences.

 

So I'm apprehensive of just letting things happen. For me, I see a moral imperative to make things better if I can, and avoid bad things happening. This may even take the form of dissuading my son from doing something he loves because it doesn't fit well with the world he's entering or the people around him. He may "do what he loves" but the money and so forth don't necessarily follow.

 

But some experimentation, stumbling about and checking out things really SHOULD be encouraged. I suppose the word "nurturing" sets off bells in my head, especially when applied to a boy or girl of scout age. They need more hands-off, in my book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"I for one think of the adult volunteers as people who want to HELP the youth, not hurt them - but hey - I must be crazy. Salem witch hunt - anyone ? "

 

I agree with you that most adult volunteers want to help the youth, however, people who want to hurt youth are attracted to positions that involve youth. That is the reason for the vigilance about background checks, etc.

 

"IMHO - scouting could use a LOT more, "let me help you learn..." out of the adults towards other adults, and a LOT LESS, "You can't do it that way b/c you're in violation of x,y,z...." "

 

Good point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×