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DugNevius

Paintball

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Because BSA does not condone the act of pointing any type of gun at another person and firing. Doesn't matter it is in sport or fun. Simply that they do not approve of physically pointing a gun at another person.

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Demonstrations are not merit badges, they are entertainment... education not BSA programs...

 

BSA probably doesn't give a darn about paintball except it is an activity that 'projects' violence at living things thus no paintball, fencing, boxing (and other martial arts) targets are fine (shotgunning etc) live targets are not...

 

Its just not the message they want to "send"...As and old sabre swinging swashbuckler...Iand the father of a boy who "loves to mark up people" I think its a shame...but there are other ways to "engage" in these activities....

 

Let's bring back taxidermy!

 

Anarchist(This message has been edited by anarchist)

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My question was why would BSA have a fencing exhibit at all if it is not sanctioned in the G2SS? That is exactly like having an exhibition of laser tag. That would be silly, tantalizing the guys with a fun activity in which BSA won't let them participate.

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Our boys wanted to do a paintbal trip but its not sanctioned by the BSA. Simple solution, not go as a boyscout trip, simply as an outside activity which includes some guys in the BSA but also includes friends and family that are not.

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We wanted to do paintball as a troop but found out the G2SS did not allow it. We decided to go "marking" instead.

 

 

 

;-)

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"Our boys wanted to do a paintbal trip but its not sanctioned by the BSA. Simple solution, not go as a boyscout trip, simply as an outside activity ..."

 

Does that help prepare young people to make ethical choices over their lifetimes?

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"Does that help prepare young people to make ethical choices over their lifetimes?"

 

why is that unethical? Because the BSA doesnt support Fencing, does that mean those boys in my troop are being unethical when they play for the state championship highschool team?

 

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FScouter,

 

way off base and out of line. Just because an activity is not approved for the BSA program does not mean that we can not tolerate or even encourage participation...we are not living in a vacume...er most of us aren't in any case. Allowing them to participate outside of scouting is unethical.

 

As Scouters we can not use the BSA program to foster or support Paintball (or fencing?) but there is absolutely nothing wrong with me taking my son and his friends fencing or paintballing...as long as it is not a scouting activity.

 

Personally, paintball is not enjoyable to me...too much like a game we played in south east asia. But because I do not find the "game" enjoyable does not mean that I will discourage those who like it from playing ....even if they are scouts...Football is not a merit badge/G2SS activity...encouraging boys to play football in school or in clubs is not an ethical dilemma (or is it verboten Herr Uberfieldmarshall?). Give us a break.

 

Trevorum,

 

allowing a fencing demo is no different than offering to let scouts watch an air show, sky divers, military rifle drills or taking them to Scout night at the football games...nor is it inconsistant...it is an educational experience and entertainment...BSA recognizes the real world really does exist (somewhere, anyway) and that other activities (not G2SS approved) can help boys grow and prosper.(can you say college scholarships, strong bodies, life long physical activities, etc.)And not everyone can play golf.

 

As many of us have said before BSA dodges liability issues with many of its "program rules" and then couches those rules in a "non violent" philosophy message...but they never say paintball, fencing, football, karate, etc., are wrong or even bad...simply not approved for BSA program...It's their game...we play by the house rules...

 

'course then you have the program Martinets that have to issue value judgements on every little thing...no matter how silly it makes them look or sound....

 

parry, reposte, Touche!

 

anarchist

 

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Anarchist,

 

I don't think Fscouter's comments were out of line. I think what he was getting at was what often happens with things like our "sod surfing" event. Sometimes the urge to do something that is not allowed by G2SS is so strong that you look for loopholes. Remember, with the sod surfing, they claimed it was not an official troop outing (wink, wink), even though it was an annual troop event, planned within the troop, used troop equipment, took the place of a troop outing and even got featured on the troop website. Heck, if I remember correctly, the troop even took out an insurance policy because of the activities they engaged in. I think Fscouter's point was that when a troop plans an "illegal" event but bills it as a non-troop event in order to do it, it is sending the wrong message to the boys.

 

There is nothing wrong with engaging in the activity with your son and his friends. I've done paintball and laser tag both and had a blast. The problem is when you want the troop to do it and plan it within the troop, but claim it has nothing to do with the troop.

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Anarchist wrote:

 

"BSA probably doesn't give a darn about paintball except it is an activity that 'projects' violence at living things thus no paintball, fencing, boxing (and other martial arts) targets are fine (shotgunning etc) live targets are not..."

 

Apparently the BSA doesn't have a problem with projecting violence against live targets if you are in Venturing. The Guide to Safe Scouting states "this policy [designating hunting as an unauthorized activity] does not restrict Venturing crews from conducting hunting trips or special adult hunting expeditions provided that adequate safety procedures are followed and that all participants have obtained necessary permits and/or licenses from either state or federal agencies."

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