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rehtona

camporee for Webelos & Troops

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I considering organizing a weekend camporee that will pair Webelos scouts and Boy Scouts. This will give the Webelos a taste of what it is like when they advance and the Boy Scouts a taste of what it is to be a leader. There will be stations which the Boys Scouts will be teaching their Webelo partners. The Webelos will have the same responsibilities (cooking, cleanup etc.) as their Scout partners. Webelos will camp with the Troop which they are assigned. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

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Remember, the activities should ALL be at the WEBELOS level, not the Boy Scout level. That includes cooking, etc. Also the Webelos should have at least 1 of their parents with them. Make sure to include them in the activities too.

 

Have you considered holding a Webelos-ree instead? You could have the Troops run the stations.

 

http://www.scouting.org/cubscouts/resources/13-238/index.html

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It sounds like an interesting idea, but I'd approach it slightly differently- more like a stations event like ScoutNut said.

 

I'd be afraid that the 1-on-1 match might not mesh real well, and that it would not be a really great time for both the Webelos and the Boy Scout. Partnering/mentoring can be tough even in good times. I'd also want to make sure that both groups and all of the individuals got time of their own.

 

(This is based on the idea that your plan was ot team people up for extended periods. It was not clear if that is your plan or not!)

 

Other than that, my thoughts are:

 

Cooking- show off your troop skills and do something special. Have the Webelos help, certainly, but don't go with roasted wieners and s'mores. Of course, most Webs won't be excited by things too exotic, either, so find a good meal to impress'em with (especially the dessert!)

 

Activities- if you work with the Web DL (assuming this isn't you) you ought to be able to knock out a couple activity pins out there, as well as making sure ot just include time to have fun, explore, relax, etc.

 

Parents- they need to be there, but notnecessarily in the middle of things. Use the time to show them how the program is boy-run, what the job of a troop leader is, and generally to recruit them as well.

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but according to National, Webelos are not allowed to participate in Boy Scout camporees. I don't agree with the policy but I think it is policy. Now, you could hold a Webelos camporee along side of a Boy Scout camporee.

 

Ed Mori

Troop 1

1 Peter 4:10

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In our council, at least, webelos are encouraged to participate in our Camporee's and Klondike's AS A GUEST OF A BOY SCOUT TROOP. The webelos cannot come "on their own" but they can come and participate with the troops. They can camp with us for the camporee (fall) but for Klondike (winter) they can only come for the day due to winter caqmping concerns.

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This comes from "Guide to Safe Scouting"

I have conducted many camporees involving the Webelos and Boy Scouts...However you should keep it to Webelos speed...having the Boy Scouts teach the Webelos. I would provide an incentive for the Boy Scouts like using the climbing towers, repelling off a cliff, or something with adventure beyond their working with the Webelos.

**********************************************************************

 

Age Guidelines

The Boy Scouts of America has established the following guidelines for its members' participation in camping activities:

 

Overnight camping by Tiger, Wolf, and Bear Cub Scout dens as dens is not approved and certificates of liability insurance will not be provided by the Boy Scouts of America.

Tiger Cubs may participate in boy-parent excursions, day camps, pack overnighters, or council-organized family camping.

Wolf and Bear Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts may participate in a resident overnight camping program operating under BSA National Camp School-trained leadership and managed by the council.

A Webelos Scout may participate in overnight den camping when supervised by an adult. In most cases, the Webelos Scout will be under the supervision of his parent or guardian. It is essential that each Webelos Scout be under the supervision of a parent-approved adult. Joint Webelos den-troop campouts including the parents of the Webelos Scouts are encouraged to strengthen ties between the pack and troop. Den leaders, pack leaders, and parents are expected to accompany the boys on approved trips.

All Scouts registered in Boy Scout troops are eligible to participate in troop or patrol overnight campouts, camporees, and resident camps.

Boy Scouts and Varsity Scouts 12 through 17 are eligible to participate in national jamborees. Boy Scouts and Varsity Scouts 13 through 17 are also eligible to participate in world jamborees and high-adventure programs.

All youth registered in Venturing are eligible to participate in crew, district, council, and national Venturing activities as well as national high-adventure programs and world jamborees. Venturers are eligible to participate in Boy Scout resident camp, but they must be multiple-registered with a Boy Scout troop and attending with the troop.

If a well-meaning leader brings along a child who does not meet these age guidelines, disservice is done to the unit because of distractions often caused by younger children. A disservice is also done to the child, who is not trained to participate in such an activity and who, as a nonmember of the group, may be ignored by the older campers.

 

Family Camping

 

Family camping: an outdoor camping experience, other than resident camping, that involves Cub Scouting, Boy Scouting, or Venturing program elements in overnight settings with two or more family members, including at least one BSA member of that family. Parents are responsible for the supervision of their children, and Youth Protection guidelines apply.

 

Recreational family camping

Recreational family camping: when Scouting families camp as a family unit outside of an organized program. It is a nonstructured camping experience, but is conducted within a Scouting framework on local council-owned or -managed property. Local councils may have family camping grounds available for rental at reasonable rates. Other resources may include equipment, information, and training.

 

Cub Scout Overnight Opportunities

Cub Scouts may experience overnight activities in venues other than accredited resident camping. There are two categories of Cub Scout overnighters:

 

Council-Organized Family Camp

Council-organized family camps are overnight events involving more than one pack. The local council provides all of the elements of the outdoor experience, such as staffing, food service, housing, and program. These are often referred to as Parent/Pal or Adventure weekends. Council-organized family camps should be conducted by trained leaders at sites approved by the local council. In most cases, the youth member will be under the supervision of a parent or guardian. In all cases, each youth participant is responsible to a specific adult.

 

Overnight activities involving more than one pack must be approved by the council. Council-organized family camps must be conducted in accordance with established standards as given in National Standards for Council-Organized Family Camping, No. 13-408.

 

Pack Overnighters

These are pack-organized overnight events involving more than one family from a single pack, focused on age-appropriate Cub Scout activities and conducted at council-approved locations (councils use Site Approval Standards, No. 13-508). If nonmembers (siblings) participate, the event must be structured accordingly to accommodate them. BSA health and safety and youth protection guidelines apply. In most cases, each youth member will be under the supervision of a parent or guardian. In all cases, each youth participant is responsible to a specific adult.

 

At least one adult on a pack overnighter must have completed Basic Adult Leader Outdoor Orientation (BALOO, No. 34162A) to properly understand the importance of program intent, youth protection guidelines, health and safety, site selection, age-appropriate activities, and sufficient adult participation. Permits for campouts shall be issued locally. Packs use Local Tour Permit Application, No. 34426B.

**********************************************************************

 

Webelos attending camporees is nice, but the older boys need to have a camporee without Webelos....thats one of the reasons their in Boy Scouts!!!! There is a chart provided by national that list what Cubs can do and what cubs should not do. Two night camping is one of these on the not to do list. Webelos come in for the day and may spend the night. One to one is the rule (one parent/guardian per Webelos Scout)

 

edited by Eagle Foot

 

 

 

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Our district has a "Webelos Woods" where troops set up demonstration area much like the scout fair except in a large camp setting. We use private property for this. Oh, yes, running water and port-a-potties are on site. The Webelos dens visit the demonstration areas. It is seen by the troops as a recruiting opportunity. It has also turned into a cooking competition! Great place to pick up receipes, for true!! Our troop does have a feeder pack, but this helps bringing in boys from the neighborhood in other packs as well. And vice versa, too. The troops set up on Friday night and the Webelos arrive on Saturday night. Some dens arrive on Friday night as well, but set up in their own campsites with proper adult participation. The OA chapter serves as facilities staff. All of that is explained in the flyer that is given out at RoundTable. The concept works and it is a real hoot to attend in any capacity. And, yes, the GTSS is followed.

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We do something similar here. A successful outcome is largely based on how seriously the Troop takes this opportunity.

 

You should note that Webelos cannot camp with the BS. They need to be separated!

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We also tried this and my son was the only WEBELO to attend the camporee. This was advertised at roundtable but was not planned well as there was nothing for him to do. I did not feel it was fair to pair him with one of my patrols because he could drag them down. It ended up working out because a few great scouters took him around and he helped grade campsites and perform other tasks of the "staff." I have offered our troop to help with WEBELO woods but it always seems that they have enough help. I wanted to do this so the boys would could be exposed to the cubs and possibly recruit from this. After thinking about this I proposed at the PLC we have an overnight outing inviting WEBELOS (along with parents) from our district. The problem ended up being the date we picked was the same day as another WEBELO function so we will try again later. The problem is "later" will now be well into the winter.

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Just a little pet peave - One Webelos, two Webelos, they are all Webelos. The "S" in Webelos is not to make it plural, it's for "Scouts".

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EagleInKy, sorry, I knew this and still managed to screw up! Trust me, if I continue to post on here, you will be a busy man, grammar and spelling are not my strong suits.......come to think of it, I have no strong suits.

 

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No biggie, just trying to educate everyone. Our former Cubmaster spelled it that way for the past two years and it drove me crazy. He's got everyone in the pack spelling it like that now. New Cubmaster taking over, hopefully it will change.

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Since you are the organizer, please, please talk with your District Committee Activity Chairman and your District Executive. They can give you useful guidance.

 

Different Councils have different interpretations of who and how Webelos camping may happen in a Camporee setting. This is one of those areas where the local SE applies judgment in how he/she implements National policy.

 

In 2004, my particular council permitted Webelos 2 dens to have an independent camping area adjacent to the Troop campsite. Webelos 1 dens were only permitted to have day outings to the various District camporees; they had to be off-property 30 minutes after the end of the campfire program.(This message has been edited by John-in-KC)

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