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Cooking in Camp...expectations

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>>That just results in one less Scout. I imagine the following dramatized conversations:

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Good examples, Eagledad. As a SM who loves to cook I always worried about meal disasters. Our campouts are tiny, maybe 8 guys and 2 adults, and we all eat from one pot. I "hovered " over the cooking at campouts , double checking everything, being too involved. Then I sat down and wrote a 20 page cookbook of my favorite recepies, with some from Betty Crocker adapted for camp. The boys prepare a menu, cook the food at camp and I don't have to "hover", they follow the book. Much better.

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I think that the topic of this discussion has turned from Cooking expectations to that of "BEING PREPARED".

What a wonderful motto we have.

 

BE PREPARED.

 

A central theme in Camping and teaching boys to camp.

I want the Scouts of my Troop to be prepared. Prepared for what?

 

I want them to have enough food for their Patrol...

I want them to have the right gear to get through the weekend... Dry socks, extra clothing, mess kits, cooking utensils, a backpack to carry it all in... (yes I actually had a new scout show up with a suitcase... made for an interesting hike into camp... and guess who carried it most of the way...I suppose I should have let the kid drag it to camp and learn a valuable lesson....not my style..and he learned anyway...showed up the next month with a nice backpack)

I want the boys to know how to start a fire, tie knots, make camp gadgets, do first aid, find their way with or without a compass, read a map.

This my friends is Scouting.

After all this discussion I find it incredable that any of the above gets done because we are so wrapped up in whos not doing what and how it is being done.

There are Methods to achieve Aims. We use the Patrol method as a tool to get boys to learn. They learn how to plan meals, cook, clean, hike, set up camp, build pioneering projects, etc etc etc...all as a team. Most importantly they have fun as a team.

I think it completely within the Scope of a Scoutmasters job to require the Scouts to do something ie: cook good meals and not just ramen. Why...because the Scoutmaster knows the boys, he knows what they need to learn, he knows their ability level. He can share life experience with them and he has mastered the art of Scouting. He leads by example and giving a poncho to a scout that forgot one is an example of the Scout Law and Oath, it also teaches preparedness.

 

You all have different styles, but what you have in common is that all of our Shirts say Boy Scouts of America on them.. and so that is the program we follow, that is the leadership model that should be followed.

 

'nough said.

 

Jerry

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I think the problem is Jerry that some leaders want the learning to happen when they want it to happen and not at the pace of the scout. If I had a new scout come to the first campout with a suit case I wouldn't say a word.

 

First , I am more interested in what he packed and how he packed it, then what the outside container is.

 

Secondly, it's his first campout. I do not expect him to get everything right the first second, or even third time out.

 

Thirdly, it's not my job to say anything about it. He has a troop guide who will be working with the patrol, I fully expect that he will train the scouts in better methods as they work to First Class. My job as SM would be to make sure the ASM for New Scouts watches the Troop Guide to make sure HE saw the problem and took steps to teach the scout a better way, one step at a time.

 

A pack is just a bag full of bags. Let's get the right gear packed the right way and then worry about the kind of outer bag being used.

 

If I saw a scout on a rainy day without a poncho I fully expect an older scout to show him how to make a perfectly usable poncho using garbage bags and a little duct tape. Will it be as good as a poncho, maybe close, but I not only want the scout to be dryer I want him to think about packing a poncho next time, and more importanly I want him tio be able to think of solutions when problems arise and not depend on a adult to bail him out with extra gear.

 

Learning good decision making is the goal of scouting, and bossing scouts around is not how it's accomplished.

 

 

(This message has been edited by Bob White)

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"What do you not understand about the word controlled? We have back up plans like additional raingear. However, if you'll remember, I said the boy WITH the best rain gear walked around soaked all the time. He HAD rain gear. He decided not to wear it. Now, we could have taken a page from Ed's book and made him wear it because it was what we wanted him to do OR we could let him learn that walking around wet for days is miserable and decide on his own.....which he does now......most of the time."

 

I don't disagree with this at all. My only point is that it bears some thought as to just where you're going to position the "safety net." Clearly, you're not going to allow a situation to occur where the boys' safety or health are in danger. On the other hand, if they insist on inconveniencing themselves by not using the equipment they have, that's a good lesson. In between is a gray area--how miserable should they be before you rescue them from their own folly? I guess I'm just saying that if the lesson is too tough, then you might run off a boy who could benefit from the program.

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Cooking cooking cooking! That's what the thread is all about!

 

I love to cook. I love to teach the Scouts how to cook over a fire, in dutch ovens, on a propane stove, etc. There are so many ways to cook so many things allowing hot dogs & ramen noodles & the like is absurd! Heck, reheating soup even falls in the same category!

 

Cooking requires some planning & work. Reheating requires no planning & minimal work.

 

Teach them to cook! It isn't hard!

 

Ed Mori

Troop 1

1 Peter 4:10

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When do you step in? Well according to the leadership training of the BSA oOnly when safety issues are involved. Otherwise there is a youth chain of operations an adult can work through rather than "tell" or "yell" a scout into obedience.

 

If it's a warm summer rain and the scout chooses to get wet so what?

 

Otherwise if the junior leaders could not get him to see the sense in wearing a poncho I would bring him under the leaders shelter for a scoutmasters conference that lasted....oh... till about right after the time the rain ended.

 

Showing a scout that if he doesn't come prepared that an adult will bail him out is not what "be prepared" is about.

 

 

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Showing a scout that if he doesn't come prepared that an adult will bail him out is not what "be prepared" is about.

 

True but as an adult we need to be prepared for just this type of situation so the Scouts will have a better understanding of what "Be Prepared" means.

 

Now, back to cooking!

 

Anyone like Emeril? I love his seasonings!

 

Ed Mori

Troop 1

1 Peter 4:10

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Each of our patrols have a cook book that I made up. It has lots of different things. Some are the same type of meal but use different methods of cooking. The rule is that they can not cook the exact same thing two campouts in a row, except for breakfast. Sorry they love breakfast tacos and they are quick and easy if we are at a camporee of something like that. Now of troop camp outs they have to do something different for breakfast.

 

Guess what. They love trying different things.

One patrol loves using the cajun microwave that I made. THey have roasted a chicken and done a potroast. They have done several box oven meals.

And of course the old stand by of dutch oven cooking.

But they try different foods.

We did one called "Rescue Chicken" You take one bottle of French Dressing, one jar of apple reserves, onions and green peppers. Mix the dressing and preserves add to chicken after browning onions. Dutch oven cook for about 1 hr.

Serve over rice. They took 1st place in our Cookoff Camporee.

If we allow kids to take the easy way out they will if we challenge them to reach higher they will.

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Ed, I've never heard of Emeril! Do love well-spiced food, though...

 

Vicki

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"True but as an adult we need to be prepared for just this type of situation so the Scouts will have a better understanding of what "Be Prepared" means."

 

A FREE Lexan water bottle will go to the first person who can find anything in the official BSA scouting program to support that opinion.

 

Being prepared has never been about counting on a leader to bring equipment for you that you were responsible for.

 

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Bobwhite, my friend... you are correct sir....

 

A troop guide would be nice.

As you are aware my troop is new (11 months old). So when we get to that point I will surely use him.

 

In the mean time...I am the troop guide/ Scoutmaster.

 

Not an argument, just clarification.

 

I love the way you and Ed go back and forth. I am going to start a thread on colors... I am sure that you and Ed could not agree on what the color Black looks like.

hahahahaha

 

I love Scouting!

 

Jerry

 

 

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"True but as an adult we need to be prepared for just this type of situation so the Scouts will have a better understanding of what "Be Prepared" means."

 

A FREE Lexan water bottle will go to the first person who can find anything in the official BSA scouting program to support that opinion.

 

Being prepared has never been about counting on a leader to bring equipment for you that you were responsible for.

 

You amaze me, Bob! You really missed my point! If we as adult leaders are not prepared, how can we expect to teach Scouts how to be prepared? Who said anything about counting on a leader for equipment your were responsible for? Once again, your interpretation is way off!

 

Back to cooking.

 

Vicki,

Emeril is on the Food Network! Great recipes & spices. You should be able to pick some up at the store. His Original & Italian are a good place to start.

 

Ed Mori

Troop 1

1 Peter 4:10

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I didn't miss your point Ed I disagree with it, as does the scouting program. If you can find anything that supports your unusual interpretation then the water bottle is yours.

 

 

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So, Bob, what you are saying is if we as adults aren't prepared we still should expect the Scouts in our charge to be prepared? Leading by bad example?

 

And your interpretation of my post is completely inaccurate. Big surprise!

 

And you are in no way on topic here, Bob. This is about cooking, not you.

 

Ed Mori

Troop 1

1 Peter 4:10

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