Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
OldGreyEagle

Non BSA Scouting Program in the US

Recommended Posts

Well, I think we pretty much beat this dead horse. Thanks for alleviating my Thanksgiving eve boredom. Dan, Fgoodwin, and ML2...thanks for playing and have a Great Thanksgiving. OGE...thanks for teeing this up.

 

BW - when you return...please forward the List of Rules and Regulations of the BSA and my beloved Baltimore Area Council to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about answering all of the questions I asked, I answered all of yours.

Why bring Bob White into the thread, he never posted to this thread?

Whats up with that?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WWBPD writes:I am just trying to get the list of the BSA's Rules and Regulations. If they cannot be provided then either they do not exist, or someone is not sharing.That's crap and you know it. Nobody is "hiding" anything from you. But if you want everything organized in one nice little binder, that's not gonna happen.If you all are telling me that the rules and regulations of the BSA are imbedded in the millions pages of literature that the BSA produces about its Program, then I want to know why it has been made so difficult for someone that just wants to volunteer their time to help a boy.More B.S. There are thousands of us who volunteer our time, but we don't let the lack of single set of rules & regs stop us from doing the best we can for our boys.

 

Since you dodged my earlier question, let me repeat it: what's your point?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmmmm? Does anyone recall a guy by the name of Yaworski, Zorn Packt, Fat Old Guy, JasonOK, etc., etc., etc. who hailed from Baltimore and had a thing for BW? Just curious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, the Rules and Regulations of the Boy Scouts of America are, from what I remember hearing, contained in a single document. Your council should have a current copy. Also, you could contact the national office, or your council's representative to the national council, or any professional Scouter. They should be able to track down the document.

 

You will notice that in the Uniform and Insignia Guide, and the Guide to Safe Scouting, there are quotes from the Rules and Regulations.

 

Now, I have never seen this document, but I think it does exist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Far as I know, the "other" Scouting organization that trys to closely follow Baden-Powell's orginal program is the Baden-Powell Scout Association. They have website and there is at least one US unit - in Fort Worth, TX. That's about all I know about the organization though.

 

As for the official rules and regulations. I forget who originally asked for it here in this forum, and there have been those that claim that the documents that we do have, contain all the rules and regulations we need to see, but, I think it is altogether reasonable for any member of the BSA to have access to that document - even to have a copy. Why not? There are references to it through the various documens that we have access to, but the actual rules and regulations seem to be very hard to find.

 

Perhaps the official rules and regulations should be posted on the BSA website?

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have the answer to the rules and the regulations question but I have done quite well over the almost 50 years I have been associated with Scouting with my ignorance of most (not all) of them. I fully expect to continue:)

 

My question has to do with the below mentioned games. Does any Scouting group out there challenge their Scouts with this much fun?

 

" 1. Look into five successive shop windows, one minute at each.

Then write down the contents of, say, the 2nd and 4th from memory.

2. Look at six passers-by and describe from memory, say, the

2nd, 3rd and 5th, and what you reckon them and their business to be.

3. Remember the numbers of the first two cabs that pass, and presently write them down from memory.

4. Describe the compass-direction of certain streets, landmarks, etc., by the sun; or, if dull weather, 'box the compass'.

5. Read tracks and their meaning - if in the country (or park) send someone out to make a fairly clear track (using walking stick, etc.). Each boy tracking for a few minutes in turn, or till he fails.

6. The instructor lays a 'paper chase' (in town or country), not with paper but with small signs such as buttons, bits of cloth, card, et., all of one color, some on the ground, some on bushes, trees, etc., to make the boys use their eyes. (Objects all of one color to be used to prevent confusion with ordinary rubbish.) Boys follow the track, each one being given the lead in turn for four or five minutes or till he fails.

7. Lay two fires and light them, using two matches only.

8. Cook lb. flour and two potatoes without the help of cooking utensils.

9. Draw a sketch of the (your National Flag) correctly.

10. Scouting race. Instructor stations three individuals or groups, each group differently clothed as far as possible, and carrying different articles (such as stick, bundle, paper, etc.), at distances from 300 to 1,200 yards from starting-point. If there are other people about, these groups might be told to kneel on one knee, or take some such attitude to distinguish them from passers-by. He makes out a circular course of three points for the competitors to run, say, about a quarter mile, with a few jumps if possible.

The competitors start and run to No. 1 point. Here the umpire tells them the compass direction of the group they have to report on. Each competitor on seeing this group writes a report showing:

1. How many in the group.

2. How clothed or how distinguishable.

3. Position as regards any landmark near them.

4. Distance from his own position.

He then runs to the next point and repeats the same on another group, and so on; and finally he runs with his report to the winning-post."

 

These were suggested by B.P. in the 'Brigade Gazette' in 1906.

 

Jolly and Simple,

 

FB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess if you can order the following from your Scout Shop, it should satisfy you:

 

# 57-491 Charter and Bylaws of the BSA

# 57-492 Rule and Regulations of the BSA

 

Though I do recall someone saying something to the effect that since these documents mainly apply to how Councils should be administered, and not how units should be administered, only Councils may be able to receive them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×