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I am from a newer troop with little to no pioneering experience. The scouts have decided to enter the Klondike this year with 3 weeks to go. We have zero idea on how to build what they are supposed build and many, many google searches turn up no results. Do you have any good pioneering resources that we can search for help? We may end up skipping this town I fear.

Thanks!

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1.  Scout Handbook Woods Tools section has an OK discussion of lashings.  The illustrations are inferior, and you have to parse out the meaning from each of the instructions. 

2.  The Pioneering Merit Badge pamphlet.  1993 version (1998 printing, if you can find it.)  Here's a site https://scoutpioneering.com/older-pioneering-merit-badge-pamphlet/

3.  Practice.  You tube videos might help.  But, you'll find, there is the right way, the wrong way, and the Scout way 😜

4.  Even if they do not have the confidence or ability, do not skip the town.  Use their time there to go and ask for a demonstration.  In humility, say exactly what you have said..."We don't know how to do this, and we do not have anyone with the experience to teach us.  Would you please show us how to do it, so we can learn?" 

5.  Would you please post a description of what the Derby officials are asking for?

6.  Where are you in NJ?  If close, I might be able to attend one of your meetings to help.

My 999th post!!!  So long, triple digits!! 😜

 

Edited by InquisitiveScouter
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Pioneering merit badge pamphlet, BSA handbook and BSA fieldbook would be good places to start to learn pioneering skills.  Beyond that your Scouts will need some imagination to either envision the thing they are supposed to build - or imagination to turn the drawings/sketches they were given into the real thing.

Definitely don't skip that station.  Let the Scouts do their best and when they get to that station ask for examples or demonstration.  Regardless, how well they do with their lashings, this will be way more memorable than sitting in a merit badge classroom.

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51 minutes ago, InquisitiveScouter said:

4.  Even if they do not have the confidence or ability, do not skip the town.  Use their time there to go and ask for a demonstration.  In humility, say exactly what you have said..."We don't know how to do this, and we do not have anyone with the experience to teach us.  Would you please show us how to do it, so we can learn?" 

This is an amazing suggestion! Thanks! Such a great idea.

5.  Would you please post a description of what the Derby officials are asking for?

Crane Tripod - build a crane using wooden poles. Construct a tripod crane with a fulcrum and a boom to lift a 25 pound item and pivot the item 5 ft. Needed - two 8ft poles, three 6ft poles & two 2ft poles for cross braces. No diagram provided.

6.  Where are you in NJ?  If close, I might be able to attend one of your meetings to help. 

Near Woodbridge, Middlesex Cty.

My 999th post!!!  So long, triple digits!! 😜

Congrats! 👏

 

 

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53 minutes ago, jjlash said:

Beyond that your Scouts will need some imagination to either envision the thing they are supposed to build - or imagination to turn the drawings/sketches they were given into the real thing.

Definitely don't skip that station.  Let the Scouts do their best and when they get to that station ask for examples or demonstration. 

Not given any drawings or sketches. That would have helped! And I cant find any using the description given.

Thanks for your advice

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OK, so, from the description, they could use their imagination to come up with something like this

Picture2.thumb.png.6eb538914a776ba2cff1dcc0325c68f2.png

 

1.  Use the three six foot poles to build the tripod, with a tripod lashing.  The top of the tripod is the fulcrum.

2.  Using the two eight foot poles, make the boom with round lashings.

3.  Attach the two cross braces (blue) with square or Mark II lashings.

All these lashings are in the Scout Handbook.

Tie a piece of sturdy rope at the end to attach to the object to be moved.

Orient the tripod and the cross braces for maximum stability while moving the 25 lbs object. 

Please see if your Scouts can come up with this solution on their own.  Get all the materials together, tell them the problem as stated above, and see what they come up with.  Part of this problem seems to be imagining and creating a solution.  

Woodbridge is about an hour away from us, so I'll pass on the visit.  The diagram above is relatively easy to construct.

Practice.

P.S. If you put the boom on top of the tripod, the upper part of the tripod staves might interfere with the movement of the boom.  They are asking for only five feet, so that is a relatively small movement.  Anyway, have the Scouts figure it out.  You could put the boom below the tripod lashing and use the cross braces as the fulcrum.  Trial and error...

And I think this is fitting for my 1000th post!!!  Thanks for the opportunity😝

Edited by InquisitiveScouter
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Just a couple of observations with pioneering:

Use rope made from natural fiber rather than nylon, poly, etc. It just sticks better when you have to pull the lashing tight.

A good lashing is tight. Pull it tight often while you make the lashing. You know it's really tight when you can hear the rope creak.

Start off by learning just the lashings you need. In the above drawing only a tripod and square lashing are needed (along with a clove hitch and any knots to hold up the pot). So just focus on that.

There are lots of details about where to put the various parts of the lashing and how to go from, say, wraps to fraps, but as a simple rule, just keep everything close together. That will help the lashing stay tight, the poles standing and the scouts smiling.

After their first success they, and you, can start looking into finer details and more lashings.

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1 hour ago, MattR said:

Just a couple of observations with pioneering:

Use rope made from natural fiber rather than nylon, poly, etc. It just sticks better when you have to pull the lashing tight.

A good lashing is tight. Pull it tight often while you make the lashing. You know it's really tight when you can hear the rope creak.

Start off by learning just the lashings you need. In the above drawing only a tripod and square lashing are needed (along with a clove hitch and any knots to hold up the pot). So just focus on that.

There are lots of details about where to put the various parts of the lashing and how to go from, say, wraps to fraps, but as a simple rule, just keep everything close together. That will help the lashing stay tight, the poles standing and the scouts smiling.

After their first success they, and you, can start looking into finer details and more lashings.

And it requires a round lashing...

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Not sure just how much pioneering is going to be used, but please don't skip the event.  They scouts will get something out of it no matter the outcome.  You have a ton or resources to help your inexperienced unit.  Reach out any commissioner or OA member to assist.  If there are eagle scouts in the area that may help grab them up.  If you have a district roundtable (from the district/council calendar) bring this up as a need.  

 From your original post, its uncertain whether you have to build a sled from pioneering material, or this is just a station at the derby.  

Bottom line:  reach to local resources around you.  You are never alone in scouting.

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I agree with not skipping an event.

They could even ask the event supervisor to teach them some lashings during that time.

At the very least encourage them to get the maximum points for "show scout spirit". 

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