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G2SS a suicide pill?


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Harry Potter was popular when I was a den leader so I made up a game called Quiditch (or however it's spelled) that involved a couple of different types of balls, basketball hoops in the gym and just enough different things going on that made it really fun. But we stopped it after five minutes when we realized the scouts would focus on just one ball and if two scouts didn't focus on the same ball, well, they could easily crash.

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@RichardB I  know better than to not follow the rules. So I do my best to keep up with BSA policies to the point that I have often had to tell my council's professional staff what is and is not a

Boy, I'm not sure why you want to set people's teeth on edge before you offer input, but you sure do a good job at it.  It's not the way I'd try and persuade folks, but I'll assume you have a reason.

Focus on adventure is the KEY That is what many do not really understand.  If Scouts are having fun and adventure and if THAT is your focus, everything else works out.  Our troop has a lot of Eag

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18 minutes ago, RememberSchiff said:

Games like viruses evolve variants. :)

Back in the day, the "Buck Buck" we played (in South Jersey) had Team One form a chain of interlocked bent over players (bucks). First bent over with arms around a tree and second player's head locked between legs. Second player had third player's head locked between his legs and so on. 

Team Two  formed a line of standing bucks. The first would run "Buck-Buck #1"  and leap on the backs of the Team TWO and try to hold on.  Buck-Buck #2 followed and so on.  The goal was to break Team One chain by bringing it down. Selecting players based on their strength was key for Team One and for distance leaping ability for Team Two.

If Team One held all Team One player who held on, Team One won that round. If Team One collapsed under the Team Two barrage, Team Two won the round.

At camporees, after losing to Troop 154 in official patrol competitions on Saturday, we rebounded in unofficial patrol competitions of questionable safety that night - Buck-Buck,  knife throwing, snipe hunt. Scoutmasters were at CrackerBarrel playing poker...late.  :)

Earlier in this topic,  the rules of Gaga were explained, which are different from the game variant I have seen here which resembles arena dodgeball.

My $0.02,

That is exactly my version of Buck Buck, I was too lazy/inarticulate to write it clearly, so I just did a cut and paste from Wikipedia. 

In terms of virus and variants you couldn't be more correct.  This is also clipped from Wikipedia: "As early as the 16th century, children in Europe and the Near East played Buck, Buck, which had been called "Bucca Bucca quot sunt hic?"

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Wow, Buck Buck on Wikipedia who would have thought.  Remember when we got our news from The Philadelphia Inquirer?

"It was almost a universal thing in Philadelphia," said Davidson, 71, who has not yet brought his deadbox to market. "I feel bad for new people moving to Philadelphia who don't know a lot of these traditions. They know about the Mummers Parade or the light show at Wanamakers. But the day-to-day community in Philadelphia evolved around street games and hanging out on rowhouse streets...

If nobody fell off, that was considered a very good thing," said Rubin, who as a child never thought this ordeal strange or dangerous. "It was group therapy at the time."  :)

https://www.inquirer.com/philly/news/philly-pimpleball-stickball-wallball-wireball-buckbuck-street-games-20181107.html

 

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2 hours ago, RememberSchiff said:

Back in the day, the "Buck Buck" we played (in South Jersey) had Team One form a chain of interlocked bent over players (bucks). First bent over with arms around a tree and second player's head locked between legs. Second player had third player's head locked between his legs and so on. 

Team Two  formed a line of standing bucks. The first would run "Buck-Buck #1"  and leap on the backs of the Team TWO and try to hold on.  Buck-Buck #2 followed and so on.  The goal was to break Team One chain by bringing it down.

Have you ever seen the human towers in Catalonia? About 30 feet high and then they walk or something. It's not good if a tower collapses. The top is usually a small teenager (?) that can climb 6 layers or so of adults like a monkey up a tree.

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We would do a "dog pile!" for fun and celebration.  When a Scout did something great, someone would yell "DOG PILE!"  If the celebrated was a smaller-statured Scout, then, usually, one of the older Scouts would be the first to tackle the celebrated person and be on elbows and knees to help bear the weight of the jumping and wiggling crowd on top.  We also had a safe word, "PINEAPPLE!"  If anyone yelled it, we had to stop immediately.  It was usually the older Scout if the weight began to be too much for him to protect the one on the bottom.

This was never used as punishment...only for celebrating.

Here's an example...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4inC-injkB4&ab_channel=SportsOnTheSide

 

Edited by InquisitiveScouter
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1 hour ago, MattR said:

Have you ever seen the human towers in Catalonia? About 30 feet high and then they walk or something. It's not good if a tower collapses. The top is usually a small teenager (?) that can climb 6 layers or so of adults like a monkey up a tree.

Had not. Just had a look, well at least those I saw on National Geographic were wearing helmets.

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3 hours ago, RememberSchiff said:

Wow, Buck Buck on Wikipedia who would have thought.  Remember when we got our news from The Philadelphia Inquirer?

 

I don't live in the area any more, but I still read the "Inky" online, mostly for the sports coverage.  Once a Flyers/Iggles/Phillies/Sixers fan always ...

But I delivered The Bulletin, which was the afternoon paper. I was never a fan of getting up early in the morning.

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On 11/27/2021 at 1:51 PM, T2Eagle said:

I don't live in the area any more, but I still read the "Inky" online, mostly for the sports coverage.  Once a Flyers/Iggles/Phillies/Sixers fan always ...

But I delivered The Bulletin, which was the afternoon paper. I was never a fan of getting up early in the morning.

I was a Courier Post paperboy which, at the time, published Mon-Sat afternoon editions.  Weather permitting, I delivered by bike, As I peddled past a house, I side-armed a folded newspaper like a boomerang from the street to front porch. The Philly papers and of course the Sunday editions were often too thick to throw.  Too thick because of their greater sports coverage and classifieds sections (General, Technical, Professional, Medical, Part-Time) covering the Delaware Valley.

Getting a Bulletin or Inquirer route was harder than getting a NYC taxi medallion. Occasionally I subbed on weekends for friends with Bulletin or Inquirer routes. I could make more money than I did with Courier all week, but what - you had to assemble (insert comics and ads) the Sunday paper at the supervised host location before heading out for delivery. Oh the weight, it really helped to have Mom or Dad drive the route. 

Great learning experience having a paper route, but that was back in the day.

Returning to OP,  G2SS. We need to journey back to teaching and trusting, If high schools teach students the safe use of power tools so can we. In 2022, lets educate scouts in the safe operation of dremels, drill presses, scroll saws...check some boxes in Boy Scouts column on SAFE Project Use Chart.

I find this reference useful

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2004-101/pdfs/safe.pdf

My $0.02,

Edited by RememberSchiff
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23 hours ago, RememberSchiff said:

Returning to OP,  G2SS. We need to journey back to teaching and trusting, If high schools teach students the safe use of power tools so can we. In 2022, lets educate scouts in the safe operation of dremels, drill presses, scroll saws...check some boxes in Boy Scouts column on SAFE Project Use Chart.

I find this reference useful

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2004-101/pdfs/safe.pdf

My $0.02,

Hell, my shop classes were all in middle school. The only pieces of equipment we absolutely weren't allowed to use were the table saw and the power miter saw.  Even the band saw could be used, but only if the cut you needed to make allowed you to keep your hands 6" away from the blade and under the teacher's direct observation.  The belt sander, jointer, planer, palm sander, drill press and lathe were all fair game.  Though the lathe was only allowed for 8th graders and only with special dispensation from the teacher.  I didn't understand why then, though I do now after seeing videos of lathe accidents involving hair, loose clothing and improperly held tools.

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13 minutes ago, elitts said:

Hell, my shop classes were all in middle school...

Same here, circa 1960's.  In our junior high, boys took a 1/2 year in each of four shops: Wood, Metal, Graphic Arts (setting type, printing), and Power (electrical, small engine). We had the same restriction regarding lathe.

Safety first. Our shop teachers were all no-nonsense men.

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I could trust some of my scouts/venturers with a skill saw more than I could trust myself. Simply put, all of that vocational training was fresh in their minds. Meanwhile a few nicks on my hide here and there had betrayed long lost vo-tech lessons.

Even as a youth, I really shouldn’t have been trusted with a belt sander when I was working on my Eagle project. But then I’m not sure if I asked permission from my folks to use it.

Edited by qwazse
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1 hour ago, qwazse said:

I could trust some of my scouts/venturers with a skill saw more than I could trust myself. Simply put, all of that vocational training was fresh in their minds. Meanwhile a few nicks on my hide here and there had betrayed long lost vo-tech lessons.

Even as a youth, I really shouldn’t have been trusted with a belt sander when I was working on my Eagle project. But then I’m not sure if I asked permission from my folks to use it.

The belt sander in shop class is typically the free-standing variety that you apply the wood against rather than the handheld variety you hold against the wood.  While they have similar risks to a lathe (or anything else that spins in a "locked on" manner), the actually chance of getting tangled up in one is much lower since the opening for something to get snagged is 1/4" wide on each side of the belt as opposed to 30"-60" with a lathe.

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Until the BSA develops training for scouters on teaching and supervising scouts using power tools i doubt anything will change.

I got my father in law's radial arm saw and as soon as I found out I could get $150 if I proved I destroyed it, I took them up on the offer. Does fine as a miter saw. Most dangerous thing I've seen for ripping boards. These are a clear no for me. Table saws and lathes in the hands of adults with little training or experience is just asking for trouble. I can see the BSA saying no or really limited use on those tools. Most other power tools I think could be made safe with a well written training program.

The BSA has figured out how to safely put scouts in the water, on rocks and shooting. They can make most tools safe as well.

 

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