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Can scouts wear necklaces


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BSA has no rules regarding jewelry.  I would ask my SPL or Scoutmaster if there are any objections and if it is a safety issue or not.  A very active Scout may find that the necklace could be damaged or lost.  Do you encounter many battles during the course of an average day?

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1 hour ago, scoutldr said:

BSA has no rules regarding jewelry.  I would ask my SPL or Scoutmaster if there are any objections and if it is a safety issue or not.  A very active Scout may find that the necklace could be damaged or lost.  Do you encounter many battles during the course of an average day?

I am a CC and I think this might come in handy for me.  😃

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The question is whether you wish to wear it inside or outside your uniform.  If worn inside your shirt (concealed) you can do it without worry, unless there is a safety issue, like rope course, etc.  If you wish to wear it visibly, I would think you can as long as it isn't offensive and you can explain the meaning.  I wear a religious necklace 24/7 and not an issue under my uniform.  If you have to visually display an item, I would have to ask whether the display is for your reasons or to advertise to others.  Either way, I don't think too many people will have a problem with it, unless it is so big or ornate that it takes away from the uniform.

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Welcome to the virtual campfire, Sigma....

If you travel around in Scout circles sufficiently, you will see some "necklaces".  Various awards on ribbons and leather strings, (yes, I would include these as "necklaces"), religious obeisances (see above mention) ,  some Troops/OA lodges award beads for activities and these wind up on a necklace.   As mentioned above, if worn under the uni, there should be no problem. If worn outside, be prepared to discuss your reason/rationale . If not part of a recognized faith, it may be viewed as more of a "good luck" piece than a religious token.  If not a "Scout " thing , even semi officially,  you maybe asked to not display it publicly in connection with your Scout uniform.  Would you?  

A personal story with , perhaps , some signifigance.  I served as a Scoutmaster for a summer camp Troop one time. The named SPL was a good Scout, took his duties seriously but the second day he turned out for flags in a camo outfit. I took him aside and I had to ask him what this outfit was and where his uniform was? He said this was a Marine BDU his dad (a retired DI !) had given him.  I said are YOU in the Marines (he was 15)? He said no. I said what are you IN?  He said the Boy Scouts. I asked, are you proud of being a Scout (he was Star)? He responded yes.   I said, alright, then why aren't you in the proper uniform for your "outfit"?   He said (quote) "I didn't bring it with me because I wanted to wear this.".  We hobbled together a Scout Uniform for him out of other Scout's and the camp's closet.  As I said, he took his duties as SPL seriously and the rest of the Troop worked well that summer.  How do you think this story might apply to your situation?  Maybe not at all? 

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1 hour ago, jcousino said:

Not the best of possible question as a response.  This item may have meaning to this person.

 

I believe this was in reference to a certain mustachioed former German leader's party.

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That makes the reply more offensive.


I do not think we as adults have much right to say anything about what a youth wears unless it is genuinely offensive. 
I see scouter wearing nonwood badge beads, weavings, old goat patrols labels,  multitudes of pins, ribbons, all nonuniform approved.

 

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On a more serious note, some white supremist groups have been appropriating Nordic symbols as their own. 

There are some Nordic heritage groups that are rightfully outraged that these racist are using symbols of their culture for more than 1000 years as part of war of hate. 

Unfortunately, in todays culture, for some, the only meaning is the one they see today and the history means nothing. 

So, short answer, you really need to have a discussion with your leaders about the specific symbols you are using and what, if any, modern day message they may send. 

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  • 3 weeks later...
2 hours ago, LOI47_Sigma said:

i dont know, all I know is that its to protect me in battle

Fair enough. Given that you don't know your best bet is to first ask your patrol leader. If he can tell you then you have your answer. If he doesn't know then you could suggest he ask the senior patrol leader. If your patrol leader is lazy and won't ask your SPL then you certainly should go ask. Again, if the SPL doesn't answer your question then it's time to go for gold, ask your scout master. Just remember, since you're not sure what type of rune it is, you need to go through this process of asking your PL, SPL, and then SM.

Good luck. Let us know what you find out. BTW, thanks for getting back to me.

 

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12 hours ago, LOI47_Sigma said:

i dont know, all I know is that its to protect me in battle

Aha, a "talisman".   A horse shoe, rabbits foot, St. Christopher's ,  Grandmom's handkerchief,  Charlemagne's reliquiy,  "He chose.... poorly"..... 

I do not seek to disparage your  desire for "protection in battle", not in the least. If there is a protection inherent in the object, certainly that is a reason to claim it. The proof will be in the pudding, yes? Perhaps it would be better not to test that "protection"?

 Perhaps it would be better to find a way to prevent or avoid battle?   

B-P's final desire was that Scouting be a way to World Brother/sisterhood.  It is all over his writing thru the later years of his life. 

Please see:    https://www.scout.org/sites/default/files/library_files/Education In Love.pdf 

Scouting can do that.  

See you on the trail. 

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On 10/9/2021 at 9:06 AM, SSScout said:

Aha, a "talisman".   A horse shoe, rabbits foot, St. Christopher's ,  Grandmom's handkerchief,  Charlemagne's reliquiy,  "He chose.... poorly"..... 

I do not seek to disparage your  desire for "protection in battle", not in the least. If there is a protection inherent in the object, certainly that is a reason to claim it. The proof will be in the pudding, yes? Perhaps it would be better not to test that "protection"?

 Perhaps it would be better to find a way to prevent or avoid battle?   

B-P's final desire was that Scouting be a way to World Brother/sisterhood.  It is all over his writing thru the later years of his life. 

Please see:    https://www.scout.org/sites/default/files/library_files/Education In Love.pdf 

Scouting can do that.  

See you on the trail. 

While it is, of course, preferable to avoid the battle, that is not always possible. Sometimes the battle is thrust upon you not of your own choosing. Those are times where any assistance or additional protection, whether real or perceived, would be welcomed. 

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