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With all the camps being sold during bankruptcy and before, this is a big thank you to all who helped maintain them over the years and donated money for them. 

The camps would not exist in the first place without donations of money or land by people who believed in scouting. Then often, especially in later  years maintenance was done by a dedicated group of volunteers who cared for the camp. They may have been scouts or parents attending a camp and decided to give back. 

At least many camps in my area did not have full time rangers after the mid 90's. So the role of volunteers increased greatly. They often donated supplies to repair things or got suppliers to give the camp really good deals in items. 

I think this is one of the overlooked things in bankruptcy that so many people put their heart and soul into these camps.

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01/09/20222: Camp Nutter Update 👍 Maine based non-profit Camp Kita announces today that it now has 28.5 acres on Loon Pond in Acton, Maine, which will be the future home and campgrounds of the or

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Sioux Council has accepted $2M offer on 223 acre Newton Hills Scout Camp from South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks. The property had been appraised at $3.59 million by the state.

Somewhat unusual for the times, there is no mention of the bankruptcy or contributing to the settlement.

"The Newton Hills scout camp was built during the 1930s and would require the most improvements of the Sioux Council's three scout camps to bring it up to the Boy Scouts of America standards, including a storm shelter, modernized latrines and showers for the campers...

Funds from the property sale would primarily be used to build storm shelters at the two remaining camps. A wetlands project and museum of paleontology are also in the works for the Lewis and Clark scout camp."

Source:

https://www.argusleader.com/story/news/2021/10/11/newton-hills-campgrounds-track-sold-november-state-park-south-dakota-game-fish/6091162001/

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The Chief Cornplanter Council (PA) will pay their total trust contribution $260,931.32 from timber sales. No council property, which is totallly assessed at $196,204, will be sold.

Source:

https://www.timesobserver.com/news/local-news/2021/10/local-bsa-council-wont-have-to-sell-properties-in-bankruptcy-case/

Edited by RememberSchiff
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4 hours ago, RememberSchiff said:

The Chief Cornplanter Council (PA) will pay their total trust contribution $260,931.32 from timber sales. No council property, which is totallly assessed at $196,204, will be sold.

Source:

https://www.timesobserver.com/news/local-news/2021/10/local-bsa-council-wont-have-to-sell-properties-in-bankruptcy-case/

That has to be a typo on land values. That would be extremely cheap land.

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44 minutes ago, 1980Scouter said:

That has to be a typo on land values. That would be extremely cheap land.

Yes. You're right.

My source. Plan 5.0

https://casedocs.omniagentsolutions.com/cmsvol2/pub_47373/da60d7ce-df85-45e9-9737-4dd1a5d50014_6445.pdf

pg 429, total contribution $260,391 Unrestricted Net Assets  $417,106 ...so I assumed the difference was the value of the unsold council property which I assumed unrestricted.

I missed page 345, for Chief Cornplanter Council as of Feb 28,2021

Assets

Cash & Equivalents                            $   105.349
Land, Buildings, and Equipment            182.408
Long-Term Investments                            957,394
Other Assets                                             154,223
Total Assets                                        1,399,374

Liabilities
Debt
Other Liabilities                                           33,515
Total Liabilities                                      33,515

Unrestricted Net Assets                          417,106
Restricted Net Assets                             948,753
Total Net Assets                              1,365,859

I also missed page 363

Chief Cornplanter Camp Olmsted  Fair Market Value $784,000 (assessed by CBRE) which must part of Restricted Net Assets above.

"Camp Olmsted is located just 15 miles north of Warren, in the beautiful scenic mountains of the Allegheny National Forest in Northwestern Pennsylvania. It includes: 485 acres of natural woodlands, three miles of waterfront with access to the 24-mile long Allegheny Reservoir lake that was created in the summer of 1967. The lake has 91 miles of shoreline, primarily unspoiled, which allows for limitless water-skiing, motor boating and sailing usage."

https://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/wm13Q8X_Camp_Olmsted_Chief_Cornplanter_Council_Russell_Pennsylvania

Good catch. My error.

 

Edited by RememberSchiff
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Miami Valley Council (ohio) announced the sale of Woodland Trails Scout Reservation in Nov 2021. It is an 1,000 acre camp that was their summer camp. They sold off another 1,000 acres from WT about 20 years ago to the state.

Now they have to rely on neighboring councils for summer camp. This is a small council that I see a merger in their future.

 

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On 1/28/2022 at 8:05 AM, RememberSchiff said:

Update 1/27/2022:

Calling the Boy Scout-owned Deer Lake Camp a “magical” place, U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., promised to help get federal funds to head off private development of the 255-acre property, which is up for sale.

“The precious and pristine treasure that is Deer Lake ... must be preserved,” Blumenthal told a group of three dozen people who gathered next to the frozen lake at the camp amid frigid temperatures Thursday.

"Unfortunately, the Boy Scouts owe money and that's a fact of life."

“It really is a treasure for the whole state, and that’s why I will be going to the Water and Conservation Fund of the Great Outdoors Act, seeking whatever resources we can do.” He said he would press for funding in the range of $2 million to $3 million dollars, and “maybe more.”

...

“Open space is not something you can lose and recover. Once it’s lost, it’s gone, it’s gone forever,” Blumenthal said.

More at source links:

https://www.wtnh.com/news/connecticut/middlesex/politicians-activists-fight-to-protect-deer-lake-in-killingworth/

https://www.fairfieldcitizenonline.com/shoreline/article/U-S-Senator-lends-voice-to-efforts-to-preserve-16811740.php

Update:  3/01/2022

Deer Lake to be Sold for Private Development.

In a surprise move that shocked many town and state officials, the Connecticut Yankee Council of the Boy Scouts of America announced last week that it had accepted an undisclosed offer for its Deer Lake property, effectively paving the way for development of the entire 250-plus acre parcel. Though the council did issue a statement that would leave open a window until March 31 for consideration of a “superior offer”, most town and state officials have said that the selling price, which is speculated to be twice the appraised value of the property, is unlikely to matched by an offer.

...

Trust for Public Land made a bid in mid-February for $2.4 million, which was rejected by the Connecticut Yankee Council, and, according to statements from the council, it has conditionally accepted a bid from Fortitude Capital, LLC for $4.6 million. According to a spokesperson for the council, the CEO of Fortitude capital is Margaret Streicker, who is also a member of the Connecticut Yankee Council’s Board of Directors, further muddying the issue of whether the council was and is negotiating with the town with full transparency.

From Connecticut Yankee Council’s website: Reshaping Our Camp Properties to Fund Scouting's Mission:

To serve the young people today- and in the future- our Council volunteers and professionals have been evaluating every aspect of our program and business to set Scouting up for success in the 37 communities we serve.

While we’ve changed greatly in the last 18 months, more change is necessary to succeed. This can be painful but is necessary, especially when looking at the situation we are in. Our Council is not exempt from the nationwide declines in membership organizations like the BSA have experienced. This, coupled with challenges over the past several years, means our Council needs to make major changes to survive.

To make those changes, the Council needs to secure funding and right-size our portfolio of properties to a level we can maintain. Simply put, we own too many properties for the membership we have today. While the outdoors are critical to delivering Scouting’s mission of preparing youth for life, owning property is not. This has been studied by the Council Executive Board for the past year as well as the Board’s Properties Committee.

On February 17, the Council Executive Board made the difficult decision to sell Deer Lake Scout Reservation. This decision wasn’t taken lightly and was done with the Scouts of today and tomorrow in mind. While we are divesting from Deer Lake Scout Reservation, the buyer is allowing the Council to lease the property for at least the next three years to operate it as a camp.

We recognize the passion behind preserving the outdoors and have had discussions with organizations committed to such while encouraging them to submit a competitive bid that can be accepted by the Board. To that end, the Board has negotiated for a specified window in which it can consider superior offers to the one currently being pursued, and any such offers would need to be received by March 31.

The net proceeds from the sale of Deer Lake Scout Reservation will be reinvested into Camp Sequassen and Hoyt Scout Camp to both improve and expand the facilities, programs and infrastructure.

As a Council, we’re continuing to evaluate how to best serve the youth of today and prepare us to serve the youth of tomorrow and appreciate the work our volunteers, families and supporters do daily.

Rudy Escalante

Council President

Mark Kraus

Scout Executive/ CEO

 

https://www.zip06.com/news/20220301/deer-lake-to-be-sold-for-private-development

https://www.ctyankee.org/council-news/reshaping-our-camp-properties-to-fund-scoutings-mission/

 

 

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Together with the questionable judgment of selling to a member of the Exec Board, ticking off a sitting US Senator is rarely a smart move.  

At a minimum, if they were going to sell to the highest bidder than the bidding should have been open, public, and transparent.

It's also worth noting that they say the funds are going to be reinvested in the other camps; they are not claiming, at least in the current statement, that the fubds are going into the bankruptcy trust.

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While I hate to see any Council properties sold off, I would have questioned the propriety and legality of the plan to seek taxpayer dollars to purchase it.

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4 hours ago, scoutldr said:

While I hate to see any Council properties sold off, I would have questioned the propriety and legality of the plan to seek taxpayer dollars to purchase it.

Government can purchase land for many reasons.  Happens all the time.  Parks.  Preserves.  Some of the scout camps are well located to become future parks.  It may be a very good opportunity to improve public lands.  

The only legal risk I see (not a lawyer) is if the sale is significantly below the appraised value ... even then an appraisal does not equal cash.

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