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Oldest is getting ready to start his Eagle project?


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Wow, time is flying.  Oldest, who is now just over 16 years old, is getting ready to start his Eagle project (with a little prodding from Mom, who is just pointing out that these things should not wait until the last minute).  Oldest still has several merit badges to work on as well, but he's getting there, bit by bit.  He has an idea -- he wants to build a bridge.  This will likely translate into building a boardwalk for either the local nature center or the school forest, and he will reach out to those organizations to see if they might need anything like that for their trails.   If that is not needed, then perhaps something else for the nature center or school forest.

But -- what are the steps of an Eagle project? Should he be asking for an Eagle coach right now?  I know there is a planning book....  What should he do to get off to a good start with all of this? 

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22 minutes ago, WisconsinMomma said:

Wow, time is flying.  Oldest, who is now just over 16 years old, is getting ready to start his Eagle project (with a little prodding from Mom, who is just pointing out that these things should not wait until the last minute).  Oldest still has several merit badges to work on as well, but he's getting there, bit by bit.  He has an idea -- he wants to build a bridge.  This will likely translate into building a boardwalk for either the local nature center or the school forest, and he will reach out to those organizations to see if they might need anything like that for their trails.   If that is not needed, then perhaps something else for the nature center or school forest.

But -- what are the steps of an Eagle project? Should he be asking for an Eagle coach right now?  I know there is a planning book....  What should he do to get off to a good start with all of this? 

This seems backwards; so he's already decided the project he wants to do and is just looking for an organization to do it for?

How about the other way around: he contacts local organizations to see if there are needs that they have?

That said, the answers are found in Guide to Advancement 9.0.2.0 The Eagle Scout Service Project

The relevant portions to start are

  • 9.0.2.1 What an Eagle Scout Candidate Should Expect
  • 9.0.2.2 “While a Life Scout …”
  • 9.0.2.3 “Plan, Develop …”
  • 9.0.2.4 “Give Leadership to Others …”
  • 9.0.2.5 “Helpful to Any Religious Institution, Any School, or Your Community”
  • 9.0.2.6 “Benefit an Organization Other Than the Boy Scouts of America”
  • 9.0.2.7 “Proposal Must Be Approved … Before You Start”
  • 9.0.2.8 “Use the Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook“ https://www.scouting.org/programs/scouts-bsa/advancement-and-awards/eagle-scout-workbook/
  • 9.0.2.9 Eagle Scout Service Project Coach
  • 9.0.2.10 Fundraising Issues

 

Edited by CynicalScouter
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36 minutes ago, CynicalScouter said:

This seems backwards; so he's already decided the project he wants to do and is just looking for an organization to do it for?

How about the other way around: he contacts local organizations to see if there are needs that they have?

I've worked with a lot of Life Scouts. I've seen it go either way: 1. The Scout has an idea, and pitches it to the beneficiary. This mostly looks like the Scout contacting the beneficiary representative and pitching the idea. 2. The Scout picks a beneficiary, the beneficiary representative and the Scout decide on a project of need. I'd say most of my Scouts (including me) went the second way, but I did have a few that went the first route. End result is the same.

The advantage for picking the beneficiary first is they might have a budget assigned for the project, where if a Scout springs an idea on them, they would probably accept, but probably don't have it in budget. But if a Scout is really passionate about doing a particular project, it might make sense to have the idea, and then find the organization that needs it. 

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The scout should download the Eagle Project Workbook from scouting.org.   Learn to save it to the computer, close the web browser and then open it.  Get used to working with the workbook.   READ IT COVER TO COVER.

The Parent should also download the Eagle Project Workbook and read it cover to cover.   The workbook as messages specifically written both for the scout and the parent.

      https://www.scouting.org/programs/scouts-bsa/advancement-and-awards/eagle-scout-workbook/

As for the best way to choose the project, it happens many different ways.  The key is to keep the scout moving forward.  And, if the scout reaches a dead-end, change directions and try again.  

Edited by fred8033
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I strongly recommend your son schedule a meeting with your troop's Eagle coach(es) before getting too involved with the proposal. There are frequently local tips and tricks to be shared (District/Council idiosyncrasies, preferred beneficiaries/beneficiaries to avoid, permitting assistance, resources, etc). The coach also helps the scout develop a realistic schedule and provides non-parental accountability. Good luck!

Edited by Rock Doc
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1 hour ago, Rock Doc said:

I strongly recommend your son schedule a meeting with your troop's Eagle coach(es) before getting too involved with the proposal. There are frequently local tips and tricks to be shared (District/Council idiosyncrasies, preferred beneficiaries/beneficiaries to avoid, permitting assistance, resources, etc). The coach also helps the scout develop a realistic schedule and provides non-parental accountability. Good luck!

Yes, we've had a lot of scouts get caught up doing things for say, local governments, where the process can take months or longer vs. working with a private foundation/charity/beneficiary where things can be moved on fairly quickly. An issue for Eagle candidates nearing their 18th. They don't need the stress. 

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Once upon a time, I worked for our local Transit system.  I was the Late Desk, which meant I welcomed the last busses into the depot, closed up and locked the doors for the night (maybe 1:30am ).

One Friday night, about 10:30pm, I answered the phone and the adult male voice on the other end asked if I could answer some questions about the Metro Subway system (???). I first asked how he had gotten this number (which was not generally available to the public). He said he had a friend who also worked for the "County". Well, okay, I'll help you if I can. He said his son was going down town the next day to attend a special class presentation at the George Washington University.  Very nice, I said,  he must be a smart young man.  Thank you. How does he catch the train, where, how much , where does he get off.....

Excuse me, sir, how old is your son?   15.  Has he ever ridden the Metro before?   No.  And are you going down to GW with him?  Of course not.   Then shouldn't I be speaking to him?   (Silence on the phone) .  Yes, I suppose so.   A younger voice appears on the phone.   We had a good conversation for about 30 minutes.  Having both driven around the campus and attended some classes there myself some few years ago,  I hope I gave him some good information and advice.  

I hope he enjoyed the session.  I did not hear back from them again. 

 

 

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13 hours ago, SSScout said:

Excuse me, sir, how old is your son?   15.  Has he ever ridden the Metro before?   No.  And are you going down to GW with him?  Of course not.   Then shouldn't I be speaking to him?   (Silence on the phone) . Yes, I suppose so.

Snowplow parenting mode...good on the Dad for realizing it and putting the responsibility on his son's shoulders.

Our community is rife with this parenting style. (snowplow, helicopter, lawnmower...choose whatever machine you wish ;) )

 

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