Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
xj-boonie

Boots for Northern Tier

Recommended Posts

since they require non-waterproof boots, I'm looking at getting a pair of the Altra Lone Peak 4 Mid Mesh Hiking Boots from REI with my coupon. Anyone have any experience with them in the BWCAW?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used the low version at Philmont and loved them.  I bought the mids to possibly use at NT this summer, assuming that happens.  Unfortunately, I can't yet tell you how they'll do.

I've also been looking at some tactical boots on Amazon.

These Altamas are out of stock, but look like a good option.

https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B07VRCJY3V/?coliid=I31U4HYRJGXFKU&colid=L6ENNQRT388W&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

Another possibility from Under Armor.

https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B076SRKVFW/?coliid=I2TEB3Q5ITAQYL&colid=L6ENNQRT388W&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've worn military type jungle boots in most activities.  They survive Philmont and parts of the Appalachian trail.  Survived the Adironacks too.  Must have the panama sole and will dry quickly.  I was used to them, but I also spent years wearing them every day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of our crews get the jungle boots, but the really cheap cheap can fall apart in a weeks time. Which reminds me, DUCT TAPE. 

Just consider that your boots will be wet 100% of the trip. So, either look for shoes that you don't mind trashing at the end of the trip, or a decent pair of boots/shoes that are designed not to hold any water like river/fishing/adventure hiking, and so on. I tried the cheap route my first couple of trips with jungle boots, then I spent money on a good pair of river shoes that I still wear around 15 years later.

Really the key to being comfortable in Northern Teir  is a good pair of non-cotton hiking socks over thin liners. Take three pairs to prevent the blisters. One pair for wearing that day, one pair to dry out during the night and the 3rd pair as a back up in case of rain. My personal favorite is smartwool hiking socks and thin ski liner socks. There are other good brands. You will spend more time in the canoe than portaging, but if you don't get the right socks, your feet will feel miserable from being wet the whole time. The combination of liners and non-cotton wool types socks repeal the water away from your skin. On the other side, many of the portages are simi-rough terrain carrying heavy gear, so the hiking socks combined with liners also prevent blisters.

Barry

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Eagledad said:

Most of our crews get the jungle boots, but the really cheap cheap can fall apart in a weeks time. Which reminds me, DUCT TAPE. 

DO NOT USE ROTHCO JUNGLE BOOTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

They are the cheap ones that will fall apart within a week. I had a pair that I wore one time, and the mud from the canoe launch sucked the sole off of it.

Thankfully the store I bought them from gave me a credit to buy the more expensive ALTAMA JUNGLE BOOTS! They are worth every penny. I had them for years until I lost them in a move. The next pair of ALTAMAs lasted about 15 years, until I burnt a hole in the sole.

I am on pair 3 for boating activities. When I was teaching canoeing, the scouts laughed at me because I was wearing my jungle boots. They were no laughing when shoes started get sucked into mud and some Scouts lost their shoes.

 

3 hours ago, Double Eagle said:

Must have the panama sole and will dry quickly.  

Concur with the Panama sole. Great for gripping, and easy to get the mud out of the grooves.

 

Also concur on wool socks and liners. A cheap way to get liners, is to use knee high ladies' hose. Just make sure A) you don't use the wife's and B ) she knows in advance that you are buying them. You don't want the wife to ask "whose are these?" ;)

 

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, Eagle94-A1 said:

Also concur on wool socks and liners. A cheap way to get liners, is to use knee high ladies' hose. Just make sure A) you don't use the wife's and B ) she knows in advance that you are buying them. You don't want the wife to ask "whose are these?" ;)

 

Will my fishnet stockings work or should I get something classier?

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

On the topic of socks....

When I was an ASM many moons ago, one of the SMs I worked with was a Viet Nam vet, long range recon patrol (LRRP).  He said at the beginning of his training in-country, he was told to dispose of his socks, t-shirts and underwear.  Why?  Extra weight, always wet, breeding ground for nastiness, just another hassle.  They couldn't stop to change socks after every stream crossing.  It might be several days before they could even take their boots off.  So it was bare feet, brand new stiff jungle boots, put em on, lace em up, move out.

When I was training for NT a few years ago, I bought a pair of decent jungle boots, panama sole, drain ports on the side.  Then I decided to take a page from my friend's book.  I started hiking around the neighborhood in the jungle boots with no socks.  Progressed to mowing the lawn and longer hikes, sans socks.

You can imagine what it was like at first--uncomfortable, hot spots, etc.  But after a couple weeks, my feet toughened up and the jungle boots broke in beautifully.  For me, it was the way to go.

Regret to say I cannot provide any further review.  Our NT trek was cancelled.  But my experiment has worked wonders for subsequent hikes and backpacking with traditional boots and socks.  I find I can hike all day with wet socks and my feet are fine. 

 

Edited by desertrat77

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 69RoadRunner said:

Will my fishnet stockings work or should I get something classier?

TMI. ;)

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went to NT about a decade or so ago. Used Altima boots and they held up fine. I don't remember my feet being wet to too big a deal. After we set up camp, everybody took off their wet socks and either got in the tent or sat around camp in dry socks and camp shoes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was pleasantly surprised by these covered toe water shoes from BassPro:

https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/world-wide-sportsman-lost-river-water-shoes-for-men

The neoprene liner makes them very comfortable without socks.  They dry out almost instantly.  I wore thick poly socks for portages to resist pebbles and sand.  The soles are thick enough that you don't feel every rock poking through when you've got a 17 foot canoe on your back; and they held to my foot well so that I wasn't slipping and sliding around in my wet shoes.  No ankle support; but when I'm kneeling in the boat, that's a good thing.

I'm still enjoying them as my go-to fishing shoes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Sentinel947 said:

I went to NT about a decade or so ago. Used Altima boots and they held up fine. I don't remember my feet being wet to too big a deal. After we set up camp, everybody took off their wet socks and either got in the tent or sat around camp in dry socks and camp shoes. 

The feet will be wet (damp) most of the day. But good socks (or no socks at all I guess) make wet feet comfortable because they get air to the skin. 

I can't imagine no socks, but I can see if the boots are well broken-in with bare feet, that might work. Interesting.:cool:

Barry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...