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RememberSchiff

When beneficiary destroys Eagle Project

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On 8/12/2019 at 2:31 PM, sierracharliescouter said:

Yes, it would, because I very much doubt that most (or maybe any) councils have the appropriate level of expertise or resources to appropriately evaluate the risks for every Eagle project, and it should be up to the beneficiary to determine if the risks are acceptable to them.

Trust me, @RichardB and the Safety Mafia will provide that in a new PD 4/5/6...OSHA compliance. 🤦‍♂️

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@John-in-KC Mafia is for folks north of the Red River.......

Anyway, Scouting participants don't need to be in the occupational world, there is however a subsidiary called Learning for Life that has a Career Exploring program.....https://www.exploring.org/

There are a couple of tools for service projects already available to help plan.   

Service Project Planning Guidelines, No. 680-027  link-PDF.gif
A checklist to help you plan that next service project. Includes reference to the Age Guidelines for Tool Use and Work at Elevations or Excavations below.

Age Guidelines for Tool Use and Work at Elevations or Excavations, No. 680-028 link-PDF.gif
An at-a-glance reference for service projects. The use of tools, by any youth or adult, requires training in the proper use of those tools before a project starts. It also requires continuous, qualified adult supervision and discipline during the project. Manufacturers’ literature and age and skill restrictions shall supersede the recommendations in the publication. If there is a conflict, leaders shall follow the most restrictive guidelines. Another good reference that contains state-specific guidance is www.youthrules.gov link-html.gif.

Currently looking at revisions to the above, if you have constructive comments or mark ups feel free to send them to the health.safety@scouting.org mailbox if you would like them considered.   

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On 8/17/2019 at 9:02 PM, RichardB said:

 

Anyway, Scouting participants don't need to be in the occupational world, there is however a subsidiary called Learning for Life that has a Career Exploring program.....https://www.exploring.org/

Yes, but all the rules and regs are based upon OSHA laws. You yourself have stated that elsewhere on this site a few years back when questions on the topic came up.

 

 

On 8/17/2019 at 9:02 PM, RichardB said:

There are a couple of tools for service projects already available to help plan.   

Service Project Planning Guidelines, No. 680-027  link-PDF.gif
A checklist to help you plan that next service project. Includes reference to the Age Guidelines for Tool Use and Work at Elevations or Excavations below.

Age Guidelines for Tool Use and Work at Elevations or Excavations, No. 680-028 link-PDF.gif
An at-a-glance reference for service projects. The use of tools, by any youth or adult, requires training in the proper use of those tools before a project starts. It also requires continuous, qualified adult supervision and discipline during the project. Manufacturers’ literature and age and skill restrictions shall supersede the recommendations in the publication. If there is a conflict, leaders shall follow the most restrictive guidelines. Another good reference that contains state-specific guidance is www.youthrules.gov link-html.gif.

Again OSHA laws.

 

On 8/17/2019 at 9:02 PM, RichardB said:

Currently looking at revisions to the above, if you have constructive comments or mark ups feel free to send them to the health.safety@scouting.org mailbox if you would like them considered.   

I will gladly do it. But I can tell you right now, GET RID OF 95% OF THEM! (caps for emphasis)

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Posted (edited)

It's an interesting form.  For a small project and for an adult, the form seems like overkill.  A five page form for 6 scouts to get together and spend a few hours on a service project strikes me as a lot of unnecessary effort.  Any reasonably competent adult is going to know how to monitor a bunch of scouts using some light hand tools.  These are generally the kinds of questions that adults ask themselves in getting ready.  We don't write them down like this, but just about every one of these is something we do ask ourselves.  Of course 90% of these questions an adult would generally find not relevant for a small project.  But a big project, yeah - we'd think plan for these.

However, for a Scout, this form seems like a reasonable workbook.  You don't have to do everything, but thinking through just about all of these questions feels like a good exercise for a Scout learning to show leadership on a project like this.  Are there site hazards?  What's the weather forecast?  What tools will you need?  Do you need to monitor usage of the tools? Are you providing snacks?  Have you planned for breaks?  An answer of "not relevant" is a fine answer.

The only one I cringed at was the stuff about health forms and permission slips.  Unless you're doing something really unusual, permission slips and health forms for helping at an Eagle project are overkill.  Isn't the Scout's parent dropping them off enough permission?  Isn't the Scout & parent deciding the Scout can dig holes for a few hours a sufficient health check?  Are we going to start having health form checks & permission slips for troop meetings too?

 

Edited by ParkMan
Added a few clarifying words

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