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neckerchiefs

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are assistant scoutmasters authorized to wear the troop's neckerchief?  I wore mine in my old troop to set a uniform-standard for the scouts to follow after, but my new troops I am assisting in seems to look down on it.

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Posted (edited)

I would defer to the PLC as to what constitutes the troop uniform.

Edited by DuctTape
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Posted (edited)

A Scout leader may wear whatever neckerchief he chooses if it follows the guidelines set out in the Guide to Awards and Insignia - or even none at all, if he so desires. If it's standard BSA issue though, there's nothing I can think of to stop you.

Edited by The Latin Scot

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"The Neckerchief

 Official neckerchiefs. Official neckerchiefs are triangular in shape. The Lion neckerchief, No. 646377, is gold with a dark blue border. The Tiger neckerchief, No. 620616, is orange with a dark blue border. The Wolf neckerchief, No. 802, is gold with a blue border. The Bear neckerchief, No. 801, is light blue with a dark blue border. The Cub Scout rank emblem is displayed in a central position on the downward corner of each rank’s neckerchief. Cub Scout leaders may wear the blue and gold Cub Scout leader’s neckerchief, No. 64070. Webelos Scouts wear the gold, green, and red plaid neckerchief, No. 64077, with the Webelos emblem on the downward corner. A Webelos leader wears a neckerchief, No. 64078, similar to the Webelos Scout neckerchief, except that it has gold embroidered edging and is larger.

A special Lone Scout neckerchief, No. 611209, is gold with the black and red printed insignia of the Lone Scout. It is worn by both Lone Cub Scouts and Lone Scouts.

Scout neckerchiefs are optional. Troops choose their own official neckerchief. All members of a troop wear the same color. The troop decides by vote, and all members abide by the decision. If the neckerchief is not worn, then the shirt is worn with open collar. Scout and Scout leader neckerchiefs may be worn in a variety of plain colors and contrasting borders.

Neckerchiefs available through the Supply Group include the embroidered universal Scouting emblem if permanent press, or printed if not. Local councils may prescribe that the specific official neckerchief be worn by Scouts and Scouters on a council or district basis. When engaged in Scouting activities, members may wear the neckerchief with appropriate nonuniform [i.e. not BSA brand]  clothing to identify them as Scouts.

Special neckerchiefs, the same size as the official ones, may be authorized by local councils. Such neckerchiefs may include identification of the chartered organization. The standard designed neckerchief may be personalized with troop number, city, and state. By troop approval, an Eagle Scout may wear an Eagle Scout neckerchief.

Boy Scouts of America,  SPECIAL REGULATIONS  at 12 (last emphasis added)

 

 

 

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46 minutes ago, The Latin Scot said:

A Scout leader may wear whatever neckerchief he chooses if it follows the guidelines set out in the Guide to Awards and Insignia - or even none at all, if he so desires. If it's standard BSA issue though, there's nothing I can think of to stop you.

The rules require all leaders,  and Scouters too, to wear any compliant neckerchief democratically selected by the Troop.  if the troop elects not to wear a neckerchief, all leaders, and Scouters too,m wear no neckerchief.  This option is the last remnant of "uniform."

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I believe the neckerchief slide is where you can express your individuality.

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One of my favorite topics.  First, about every woodbadge bead wearer takes pride in their earned beads, neckerchief, and woggle.  I've never seen anyone having a problem with that wear at any function.  I do keep them available and wear them often.  With that said, I have a lot of neckerchiefs going back to 1978 when I was just a tenderfoot.  At long term camps I like to wear a different one daily, and change the slide daily too.  I think the 30+ slides say a lot and bring up conversation as an ice breaker with new scouts.  I like to wear the frying pan slide when I'm doing a dutch oven demo.  Indian or arrowhead during OA events.  If the unit wears a unit neckerchief, I tend to wear theirs like the unit.

As a youth, we were cool when we stashed the neckerchief and started wearing bolos.  I wore many a long time, but now the coolness has worn off.  Mine hang for good measure or when a neckerchief may get troublesome.

As a district scouter, I tend to wear the neckerchief to events.  I like to refer to all the uses of it, much like the military cravat or triangle bandage use.  We used to do first aid training with our neckerchiefs.

Here is where I may turn everyone against me.  In my youth in high school, I was wearing my uniform with neckerchief when a few high schoolers started running their mouth about BSA and me in my uniform.  Long story-short:  It came down to "just because I wear the boy scout uniform, doesn't mean I can't kick your *!*".  That kind of settled it without going further.  Oh, our youth days.  Sometimes the 12 points of the scout law can conflict each other in situations like this.  This case:  Friendly vs. Brave.  Brave won. 

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I am saddened  to see the way the necker has fallen from favor.  World wide, it is the recognized symbol of the Scout, whatever gender.  In the less fortunate areas, the Scout may have a

special t-shirt and neckerchief, that's his uniform, but he will have the neckerchief. 

The Troop of my yoooth  had designed it's own neckerchief,  a big one, 30" on a side, bright red, with a custom patch that read "Troop 759 Always On The Go ! " with a pair of disembodied boots kicking up a cloud of dust. Us Scouts and our parents made sure of the truth of that motto.    That necker is much faded now, with some holes and mended rips from being used in signal flag  (wig wag?) and first aid practice, it is brought out to show at CoH's and such. 

The ESL necker of the 70's  was a mistake,  relegating it to the duty of fashion statement rather than proud symbol and practical emergency tool.  I once found a Troop necker on the side of the road, discarded by a passing car, I believed, from it's location, not by accident.   I took it home , cleaned it up and added it to my collection. Since it was a "Standard" issue BSA Scoutshop  item, there was no way to trace it's source.   I once worked at our church camp as the Handyman.  I once came back to my cabin to find a Scout necker draped on the doorknob, "Troop 1, Lewes Delaware"  on the peak.  When I researched it, I could not find such a Troop.  Another addition to my collection.  People give me such things,  items of curiousity . 

"It's dorky, it's uncomfortable,  no one wears them,  why do I have to,  what's it for,  I keep losing the slide,  can I just leave it home,, , , , "    is that what we hear?  Or perhaps, thru the woods, we can hear the waving of wig wag Morse code?  

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Yah, the troop I'm with has a designated necker. However I'm nearly certain that this is because adults decided it at some point. That's a whole other issue with adults mouthing the words scout lead while doing the opposite. Something I hope to change course on with assistance in the future. 

I've no problem with the necker, per se. I don't like that it's so small on my adult frame, but that's the situation with being adult size. I don't care for the slide, but I can make a woggle if I so wish, so I'll do that some day. In this troop, nearly all of the adults wear the approved necker whenever we are in uniform. If they don't, its only temporary for whatever reason. And some are wearing another sanctioned necker (wood badge, eagle, etc) depending. I really appreciate the scouters who wear their neckers and their beads together. That's dedication there. 

However about 1/3rd of the scouts don't wear the necker generally. It comes and goes in fashion depending on who in the troop is wearing it. The older scouts stop wearing it as they exert their independence or if they become sloppy, and thus the younger scouts think that's the way to go. Some have lost it or whatever and aren't interested in asking for a replacement. 

The fun is when we get some good scouts in charge and they wear the necker proudly. It causes the other scouts to start wearing theirs too. That's the current status this year. I'm pleased as punched about it. Nearly all the scouts are currently wearing it. 

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Funny, as much as neckerchiefs have fallen out of favor, when I worked in the trading post at the last National Jamboree, one of the things that shoppers could not get enough of was bandannas that had a map of the jamboree on it,  fold a bandanna into a triangle, and you have a neckerchief.

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22 minutes ago, Buggie said:

The fun is when we get some good scouts in charge and they wear the necker proudly. It causes the other scouts to start wearing theirs too. That's the current status this year. I'm pleased as punched about it. Nearly all the scouts are currently wearing it. 

A wonderful thing, indeed!  It's a true example of "boy led", isn't it?

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