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Cburkhardt

Great Examples of Girl Troop Successes

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1 hour ago, PinkPajamas said:

Slightly off topic.

My daughter and two other girls just crossed over to Weblos. We have three girls in an AOL den. The troop our pack shares a charter with has stated a commitment to start a linked female troop. Do you have any advice on things we could be doing to make sure this troop has a good solid start? Besides helping the AOL den find two other girls. What do new troops need from their incoming members?

Obviously, the bigger a den the better. But, it the odds of success increase with every 11-13 year old who is interested in a troop. Incoming members of diverse age, yet full of brotherly love is a big deal.

Trained adult female leaders is essential. So incoming members who can bring a mature sister or aunt are invaluable. This may mean putting real $ behind funding the training of a younger SM/ASM (e.g. a 20-something college grad or ex-military). If the parents of these scouts aren't in a position to do that, they need to figure out how to ask for help.

Finally, one of the biggest blessings is someplace special to camp. Who has property (maybe near a trail)? Whose grandparents have a farm? Which parent has done a favor for a park manager and can ask for a camping spot in a hidden corner of a a community park. Scout camps are nice. But it's really nice to have someplace special that your troop can call "its own."

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We used our Webelos II Den to jump-start our all-girl troop.   We started with about 6 Webelos girls and had 10 by the end of the year.  All crossed-over into our new all-girl troop in February, which now numbers 26.  Those 10 Webelos were the ones who provided the basis for our new Troop open house/welcome parties.  Through them we gained another 10 girls and have picked up another 6 over the last 2 months based on word of mouth.  It is easier to get girls to join the Webelos group, so I urge you do recruit them now.  It will make your planned new troop a lot easier to start.  One thing I learned is that girls are more likely to bring their friends into a Troop than my experience with boys.  Open house -type activity where a prospect girl member sees her friend in a uniform and having fun with peers really works.  I would allocate a good amount of recruiting effort to peer-to-peer activity..

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On 4/16/2019 at 7:49 AM, Cburkhardt said:

Our own Troop received about $2,000 cash from two Episcopal Churches to help pay costs of under-resourced Scouts.  The volunteers who started the troop absorbed about $5,000 of start-up costs.  Starting brand-new Troops is expensive and time-absorbing.  Our first year budget is $40,000.  There are good reasons why so many new Troops fail in their first five years, but the principal reasons are lack of experienced Scouter involvement and failure to plan.  New Troops need to raise more and charge higher dues, which puts them at a recruiting disadvantage with historic troop with well-build financial stability and low dues.  Our group is well-staffed and has a good plan.  I hope experienced Scouters reading this will step forward and actually assist new Troops now forming.  There is no substitute for direct involvement.

Just curious about the breakdown of the $40,000 annual budget. Our 40+ scout troop probably operates on a tenth of that amount. Are you including the costs for summer camp or super trips?

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7 minutes ago, Rock Doc said:

Just curious about the breakdown of the $40,000 annual budget. Our 40+ scout troop probably operates on a tenth of that amount. Are you including the costs for summer camp or super trips?

Not the person, but $40,000 to start up presumably includes a lot of costs that will be amortized over many years. Troop trailer, tents, cooking gear, etc are not cheap, but will last a long time.

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Our $40,000 yearly budget includes everything for 40 Scouts.  So, the all-in expense to the Troop of a Scout is about $1K/year.  Includes all program and recognition, weekend campouts, summer camp, but not the annual special trip.  This is less than the cost of a single "travel team" away game where a child and parent fly somewhere.  Scouts BSA is truly a bargain in comparison to just about any other youth activity.  We can all be very proud of this.

Our special annual trip is modest.  This year a 4-day camping trip including a day visit to the World Jamboree (will probably charge somethin like $200).  Next year a trip to Michigan to another Scout Reservation (Owasippe) to experience their incredible horse program.

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The capital acquisition budget is separate.  We are modest there and are going the "minimalist" route.  Less than $10K over 2 years for the basics and no trailer.   We are an urban Troop with some under-resourced families and are accessing a lot of contributed individual equipment for their Scouts.  We are really blessed by having established troops willing to lend us things as we ramp-up and a very generous group of scouters who gather, organize and re-deploy used uniforms and equipment.  I hope those reading this who have access to lendable equipment proactively reach-out to these new all-girl Troops and offer help.  Most of them are not going to be led by a 30-year Scouter like me and will have no idea how to get the help.

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On 4/16/2019 at 8:28 AM, PinkPajamas said:

Slightly off topic.

My daughter and two other girls just crossed over to Weblos. We have three girls in an AOL den. The troop our pack shares a charter with has stated a commitment to start a linked female troop. Do you have any advice on things we could be doing to make sure this troop has a good solid start? Besides helping the AOL den find two other girls. What do new troops need from their incoming members?

Does that mean they'll be crossing over to scouts in two years time?  Hopefully by then there will already be a troop going that they can join.

Consider critical mass.  Are there other girls troops starting in your town or school district?  It might make sense to join with them instead of getting another new troop going.  (Or maybe there will be enough interested girls for another new troop.)

About this "stated commitment to start a linked female troop".  What is backing this statement?  General goodwill?  A willingness on the part of the troop committee to help with the administration of the new troop?  Experienced scouters with daughters who want to be scouts?   A daughter who really wants to be a scout can be *very* motivating to an adult to put the time into volunteering.

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