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ScoutMom45036

My new Scout's going to camp but freaking out

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On 3/25/2019 at 12:12 PM, T2Eagle said:

Sign up and go as a leader.   Scouting should be a years long journey.  One of the surest ways to have that journey cut short is if the scout has a truly miserable experience early on.  If your presence is necessary to keep his experience from being immiserating than you should be there.  He may still not like it, scout camp can be a long week away from the things he knows he does like, but it's OK if it's not a great experience just as long as it's not so bad that he doesn't want to continue in scouts at all. 

DavidCO's advice was don't make him go.  I would choose that course of action only if you believe that even your presence will not make it a miserable experience for him, and you of course are the best, albeit still an imperfect, predictor of that.

Thanks. This is the conclusion I have reached... I will go for half the week. Scouting itself is a good fit, but you are right...a bad experience would make him want to quit....and I value him staying.

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On 3/26/2019 at 10:27 PM, Liz said:

3 of my 4 kids experience abnormal levels of anxiety. Anxiety is its own beast and is not the same thing as "separation anxiety" which should resolve itself within 24 hours or so of arriving at camp.

You know your son better than anybody. Do NOT be afraid to attend camp with him this first time if that's what he needs. If you feel he really just needs the push, don't be afraid to do that either. But don't push him if you think it's just something you "should" do. Push him if, in your experience, you find those pushes actually help him grow. If you have found in the past that those pushes make him feel more anxious, it's probably better to just go ahead and go, so he sees it isn't so scary. Next year he'll be more familiar with the location, and with the other kids, and possibly even the staff. 

If you go to camp, perhaps volunteer to do something that will keep you busy, but still available if your son needs you. Maybe help in the kitchen, or supervise a merit badge station, or whatever. If your son's anxiety is too high he can hang out and help you with your task; and if he's feeling OK he can go around camp with his patrol and have fun. 

I understand the suggestions, but knowing my kid, I have to set clear boundaries with how much time he spends with me at camp. Thanks for speaking up for anxious kids, though.

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On 3/28/2019 at 4:36 PM, PinkPajamas said:

Have you asked him what compromise would make him comfortable enough to go? 

 

I think I will volunteer for half the week and set clear boundaries so he is not my "shadow."

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2 hours ago, ScoutMom45036 said:

I understand the suggestions, but knowing my kid, I have to set clear boundaries with how much time he spends with me at camp. Thanks for speaking up for anxious kids, though.

I think that's the real key - knowing what works for your unique kid.

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You've got a plan. That might relieve a bit of the anxiety. There is still some time before the event, so you can expect him to swing back and forth on this. Be prepared to be flexible.

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"Having additional needs doesn’t mean you can’t achieve great things. Life doesn’t stop with diagnosis.”

A 10-YEAR-OLD boy with dyspraxia, anxiety and sensory issues will have a chance to meet Bear Grylls  (Chief Scout, UK Scouting Association) later this month at a glitzy ceremony in Windsor Castle after earning a top award for helping others.

https://www.sthelensstar.co.uk/news/17561214.10-year-old-wins-prestigious-award-for-his-kindness-and-will-also-get-to-meet-bear-grylls/

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7 minutes ago, RememberSchiff said:

"Having additional needs doesn’t mean you can’t achieve great things. Life doesn’t stop with diagnosis.”

A 10-YEAR-OLD boy with dyspraxia, anxiety and sensory issues will have a chance to meet Bear Grylls  (Chief Scout, UK Scouting Association) later this month at a glitzy ceremony in Windsor Castle after earning a top award for helping others.

https://www.sthelensstar.co.uk/news/17561214.10-year-old-wins-prestigious-award-for-his-kindness-and-will-also-get-to-meet-bear-grylls/

Thank you. And this is one of the things I love most about scouting.

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