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5thGenTexan

Wood Badge and Part C

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Should I forget about Wood Badge and ultimately being part of my units leadership?

I recently had my annual visit with my endocrinologist to check thyroid.  My BP was 150/80.  I get particularly nervous in the doctors office.  I know that is not going to cut it to pass the physical for Part C of the health form.  It sounds like to me they are going to let me attend WB anyway so should I continue in my pack duties?  Not going to be able to to do any camping more than a weekend either without Part C.

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UNless things have changed, I think half of my Council's adults would be disqualified if that was the BP cutoff.  I don't think you have anything to worry about.  I know the standards were tightened for Philmont, but I don't think Packs are doing high adventure stuff.

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They dont specify Philmont or High Adventure.  Just what should be.

 

Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

Scouts and Scouters should have a normal blood pressure (less than 140/90). Persons with significant hypertension should be under treatment and their condition should be under control. If participating in a Scouting event that is physically demanding, it is recommended that hypertension be under control in the six months prior to the date of the event. The goal of the treatment should be to lower blood pressure to normal levels. Those already on antihypertensive therapy with normal blood pressures should continue treatment and should not choose the time they are at any Scouting event to experiment with or change medications.

 

https://www.scouting.org/health-and-safety/risk-factors/

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Always take "should" to reflect in your favor.

 

In any case, WB isn't really physically demanding. My course had several members who had physical limitations.  We had a cart shuttling members from site to site as needed.

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9 hours ago, 5thGenTexan said:

Should I forget about Wood Badge and ultimately being part of my units leadership? ...

As we discussed in your prior post, a lot of great leaders serve their units well without taking WB.

Give your primary physician time to look over the paperwork and decide if you need any restrictions.

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On 12/23/2018 at 9:56 PM, qwazse said:

As we discussed in your prior post, a lot of great leaders serve their units well without taking WB.

Give your primary physician time to look over the paperwork and decide if you need any restrictions.

I don't have a normal PCP.  I see a specialist once a year to get weighed, poked, and drain a quart for testing.  So I will probably go to a local CNP for a physical and tetanus booster.  The BSA says what they want BP to be and seem to indicate if its above their number you can't play.

 

As for WB itself...  I have CM, ACM, CC, COR, Troop leadership asking when I'm going.  I feel compelled to find a way.

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Don't ignore the phrase "if participating in a high adventure activity ..."

WB is not a HA activity.

Have you actually talked to your specialist about participating in weekend courses like WB?

Do you monitor your own BP?

Regarding troop leadership, they may mean well. But, they need to go pound sand. If you're a good leader, they aren't going to let you slip away over your apprehension about attending a course.

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If the BSA is now in the business of requiring certain numbers for things like BP, and lab work, I think they are practicing medicine without a license.  ALL they need to know is that my personal physician has checked the box that says "cleared for all activities", or specified restrictions, and affixed his signature.  There are many factors that go into an individual's health status than a single BP reading.  I once had an internist who would take readings while I was standing, then lying down, right arm AND left arm, then average the numbers.  And those little wrist cuffs that never get calibrated against a primary standard are worthless.  

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At Philmont check-in a few years back, my BP was higher than they liked.  Hung around the medical place, drank water, etc.  One of the medical folks came in, I asked what's the end game here.  They advised that ultimately the decision to head for the trail was my decision.  I told them "and we're done here".  Had a great trek.  80 plus miles, Baldy and Tooth, etc etc

I have not take WB but knowing some of the leaders in our council and from photos, pretty sure NOT a HA and not a physically stressing activity.

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On 12/23/2018 at 1:22 PM, 5thGenTexan said:

 I get particularly nervous in the doctors office. 

Sounds like a case of "White Coat Syndrome." I too have "high" blood pressure when I got to the doc's office. Had me monitor the pressure twice a week at work for a while and it was normal. But when I came to him, it was high. heck one time I has it checked 30 minutes before my appointment and it was borderline low.  But once I got to the doc's office, yep it was high again. Put me on blood pressure meds.  I took them and was not my normal self. I ended up stop taking them because I almost passed out as my pressure dropped drastically. Thankfully I was atr work.

As others have stated, get it checked out, talk to your doc. From what I have heard, most strenuous activity is walking from the campsite to the dining hall. 

 

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"Under Control" is the key word and tricky phrase.  I've had HBP my entire adult life.  I take my meds, my doc is happy with the numbers, I tell him what I'm doing, he signs the physical.  End of story.  

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On 12/23/2018 at 11:22 AM, 5thGenTexan said:

I get particularly nervous in the doctors office. 

Places like Walgreens have blood pressure machines. Go there once a week till you're bored with it. A) you'll find out what your bp really is and B) you won't worry about it at the doctor's office. A long time ago I was severely stressed about something and my bp was up some 30 points over normal. The lesson was work on the stress, not the number.

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I'm 99% sure you'll be fine to attend.  I cannot imagine them not accepting your medical condition.

If you're still concerned, find out who the course director is and ask.  He or she will be able to work through it with you.

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Most Scout camps are pretty easy to walk about. 

Medications to control your heart work really well.  Most of the big brand name meds ... Toprol, Lipitor, have generics now. Talk to a physician or CNP. 

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Cardiac related issues, for men over the age of 40 are a real issue in and out of Scouting.    Hypertension is just one risk factor.  

Would suggest the OP engage a PCP and address the issue and potential others.   Would also suggest that it's something the OP should discuss with the leadership team of the WB course, no differently than you would want a participant in your unit to address any restrictions or potential work around.   Not sure where the OP is going to WB, it might make a difference.  

 

 

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