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69RoadRunner

Girl Scouts Suing the Boy Scouts

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13 minutes ago, HashTagScouts said:

Cooking, with its outdoor element, only became required in 2014.

I will have to go back and look in my old handbooks as to the exact Cooking MB requirements at the time, but it was an Eagle required MB when I earned my Eagle in 1971.  Looking at the history of Eagle requirements, it has been a required MB since 1914.

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12 minutes ago, MikeS72 said:

I will have to go back and look in my old handbooks as to the exact Cooking MB requirements at the time, but it was an Eagle required MB when I earned my Eagle in 1971.  Looking at the history of Eagle requirements, it has been a required MB since 1914.

It was dropped in 1972 and added back in 2014.

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49 minutes ago, Eagle94-A1 said:

Irony is that the two ladies who names keep popping up as potential female Scouters for the all girls troop all believe that going coed is a mistake on the BSA's part, and that GSUSA should have improved their program to meet the needs of the girls.

GSUSA seems to believe that it has improved its program (by making camping merely peripheral to the program) to meet the needs of the girls (the large number of girls that don't want to camp).    After all, even in BSA, the outdoor program is only a method, not an aim.   It seems that GSUSA thinks that other methods work better for most girls most of the time.

It is great that the (probably minority) of girls who don't view GSUSA's improvements as improvement now have a second option of scouting organization.

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While we would like to get a lot of moms who already have outdoor skills, we don't need them to have the outdoor skills immediately.  As with many dads who come into Scouting with little or no outdoor experience, and pick those skills up right along with their sons from camping and outdoor veterans, moms will learn alongside their daughters, most likely (in the beginning) from men with Scout camping experience who volunteer to help out in the girl troop.  For now, we need to sign the moms up as female adult leaders in girl troops for YPT purposes.  Get them signed up to just be there, and their daughters will get them out in the field.

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I could very easily run a girls BSA troop if I had girls that wanted to join, currently all the girls I know (including my daughter) want to be Girl Scouts and if I had one women that was willing to be there to meet the BSA YPT requirements. 

At this point I think I will just take my daughter and son and any other trustworthy friends that want to tag alone on long hikes without the mess and headache that is GSUSA.  . .

.  .  . go "scouting" without BSA or GSUSA. . .  just for the fun of it.

   

 

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7 minutes ago, cocomax said:

currently all the girls I know (including my daughter) want to be Girl Scouts

Between two and five years from now we'll find out if BSA's gambit worked.  The number of girls crossing over from Cub Scouts will tell us.

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10 minutes ago, dkurtenbach said:

Between two and five years from now we'll find out if BSA's gambit worked.  The number of girls crossing over from Cub Scouts will tell us.

Well, that's half the metric, the other half is the number of boys that decide to leave due to the gambit.  Earlier in this thread (I think) someone suggested the BSA's goal should be a 50/50 representation of boys/girls.  There's two ways to get there, recruit a lot of girls, or lose a lot of boys.  We'll see.

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11 minutes ago, dkurtenbach said:

Between two and five years from now we'll find out if BSA's gambit worked.  The number of girls crossing over from Cub Scouts will tell us.

Unfortunately, that's only one of two metrics. If BSA attracts two million girls but loses its intended nature in the process (for the reasons described above), I wouldn't count it as a success.

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5 hours ago, Jahaza said:

In that case, I'm left not really understanding what you mean by "The lack of actual requirement for anything related to outdoors beyond First Class as well."

But there have never been such requirements other than merit badges, unless you count the brief period when the participation requirement read "While a Life Scout, work actively as a leader in meetings, outdoor activities, and service projects of your unit" 1958-1965.

Many used to actually enforce a minimal measure of what it meant to "serve actively in your troop" in terms of leadership PORs, which by general rule of thumb from my time as a youth was 75% of all troop activities, and campouts were part of that.  I see ever increasing numbers of units that have no minimum criteria, and not so coincidentally have issues of getting older scouts to actually go on campouts.   

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16 hours ago, walk in the woods said:

Well, that's half the metric, the other half is the number of boys that decide to leave due to the gambit.  Earlier in this thread (I think) someone suggested the BSA's goal should be a 50/50 representation of boys/girls.  There's two ways to get there, recruit a lot of girls, or lose a lot of boys.  We'll see.

If BSA is not lying to us and the troops will be separate and not become co-ed, it won't be a huge impact at the Boy Scout level.

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59 minutes ago, 69RoadRunner said:

If BSA is not lying to us and the troops will be separate and not become co-ed, it won't be a huge impact at the Boy Scout level.

I'm not sure I agree with that but we'll see how boys respond after their first co-ed summer camp experience.  I've said before and I'll repeat here, whatever we're calling boy scouts in 2020 will be moved to the gender segregated patrols model at the NAM in May of 2020.  We'll be told demand from the field, and parents, and that field experience shows the current girl troop model isn't working, and that it makes sense to parallel the Cub structure for continuity.

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17 hours ago, RememberSchiff said:

Hmmm, has the gender composition of Venturing or Sea Scouts been disclosed? 

I don't know if the link is helpful as the category is Rover Scouts which may mean Venturing and Sea Scouting in the USA.

https://www.scout.org/sites/default/files/library_files/Grand Total Membership with Genders at 31 Dec 2016_0.pdf

The breakout is 105K boys and 32K girls as of YE 2016.

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