Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Hawkwin

Transition from Scouter-lead to Scout-lead

Recommended Posts

25 minutes ago, MattR said:

Some guidance for adults on how to overcome these problems would help. We started something that really helps with planning. The issue with planning seems to be the scouts don't understand how much detail is needed or that things don't always go as planned. So we just ask them to make a presentation about their plan and all we do is ask them lots of questions along the lines of who, what, where, when. As long as the basic idea is scout appropriate we go with it. The scouts were a bit intimidated at first but now they walk out with a lot more confidence.
 

The challenge for adults is knowing skills for filling in the gaps where scouts struggle. For example I found that 80% of the scouts in our NYLT courses had "NO" guidance for how to run a PLC meeting. The adults basically threw them into the den of lions by telling them to run the meeting without teaching any skills. I learned that most adults don't really know specific skills to plan and run meetings, they just know how to be methodical. But scouts don't have a life experiences to think about what is required for meeting agendas. Our NYLT participants where taught a simple meeting plan used for all meetings and patrol corners as well as simple plan for planning meetings. That gave those scouts such a huge lift in running meetings that the SMs told me they were learning from the SPLs. 

It's easy to say that National doesn't know what they don't, so they can't teach everything. But I found that the SPL Handbook does give simple guidelines for running the PLC meeting and PL Handbook for Patrol corners. So, there are good starting places. IF the troop would just start with the simple guidelines in their handbooks, then the holes that stump the scouts are a lot easier to work through. 

I certainly agree adults need more guidance for Patrol Method. I developed a Patrol Method course for our council. But, if the adults would search a little more for BSA sources to specific situations, they would find that there is a lot of information. Especially in the age of Internet. But, adults, for whatever reason, choose to teach scouts their own personal techniques that are usually very complicated and confusing.

If we should teach the adults anything, it's to search their resources to the problem first.

Barry 

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Eagledad said:

I learned that most adults don't really know specific skills to plan and run meetings, they just know how to be methodical.

I think that's a great point Eagledad.  

I started saying many years ago that I think every college grad should have taken courses in some very basic concepts that the vast majority don't understand, such as....

how to run a meeting and how to attend or participate in a meeting you're not running.

how to file stuff, calendar/schedule use, and how to keep organized.

how to deal with people (brainstorming, coaching, maintaining reason, understanding personality types, etc..)

Now that I think about it no reason that shouldn't be every high school grad.

In my experience, many of these things are touched on throughout school but never really tied together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, blw2 said:

I think that's a great point Eagledad.  

I started saying many years ago that I think every college grad should have taken courses in some very basic concepts that the vast majority don't understand, such as....

how to run a meeting and how to attend or participate in a meeting you're not running.

how to file stuff, calendar/schedule use, and how to keep organized.

how to deal with people (brainstorming, coaching, maintaining reason, understanding personality types, etc..)

Now that I think about it no reason that shouldn't be every high school grad.

In my experience, many of these things are touched on throughout school but never really tied together.

I'm still waiting for a chapter in Driver's Ed. textbooks about how to not drive like a jerk. :)

Edited by Saltface

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our Troop started an Adult 101 series. We started with some basics that our current SPL (my son, as it happens) felt that every Scout should know, but are not necessarily covered in any Rank requirements or Merit Badges. He actually taught every Scout in the Troop how to sew on a button and repair a tear (works for tents, clothing, socks, etc.). Most of the parents of our Scouts don't know how to sew. But I think you are on to something with how to run a meeting, and how to be a participant. Time management topics are always good, essential skills that translate to every corner of a Scout's life. I plead with parents (more than Scouts, since they tend to be more tech savvy) to please sync the Troop calendar from our website to their phones. Other topics yet to be covered include ironing a shirt, balancing a checkbook, and even how to write a letter and address an envelope (don't ask about what I have seen- it will chill you to the bone).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/29/2018 at 2:40 PM, Hawkwin said:

Even though my son's SM did a good job of trying to teach the parents how boy scouts was different from cub scouts, I still didn't get it for many months later and much through my own self-education. I would imagine that the vast majority of parents (especially those not active in any leadership capacity) never really get it at all.

When the Webelos and their parents come over to visit the Troop, the boys are temporarily assigned to patrols and the parents are taken aside.  The SPL or ASPLs then talk to the parents to tell them about the program.  As SM, I'm in the room but I couldn't get a word in edgewise.  The first words out of the SPL/ASPL is "we are a boy -led Troop.  That means that the adults are here for just health and safety reasons."  The second thought is "We are a patrol-based Troop.  The patrol leaders run their patrols and our jobs are to help the patrol leaders succeed and to coordinate  the patrols to work together as a Troop."  They then talk about how we do camping and about summer camp and advancement.  After around 30 minutes, I suggest they go check no how the meeting is going and I get a chance to talk to the adults.  By that point, the adults already get it.  They see two 15 or 16 year olds comfortably  talking to a group of adults  and explaining how the Troop works.  I explain that he adults are the coaching staff.  We work with the kids off the field or on the sidelines, but we let them play the game.  I explain that the Scouting program is a safe place to fail and how we will let them fail because they learn best from their mistakes.  I explain our Troop's culture, where the older Scouts really adopt and take care of the new guys.  The adults then  paraphrase Renee Zellweger and say, "You had me at boy-led."

When parents come on campouts, I give my 30 second training.  "Do you have a chair?"  "Yes."  "Do you have a coffee cup?"  "Yes." "Your job is to sit in your chair and drink coffee.  If a youth comes to you and asks you a question you have a decision to make.  If it is a matter of safety, you become involved, otherwise, you tell them to ask their patrol leader."

That is the major difference between Cubs and Boy Scouts.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×