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ItsBrian

Is WFA worth it?

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5 minutes ago, HelpfulTracks said:

Well, depending on where you live, WFR may be an option for a squad to pay for. Or perhaps you could talk your council into sending your to WFA instructor and wrangle WFR in the mix somehow. Or it might be useful if you planned on working at Philmont or NT for a Summer. There are a number of ways you might be able to make it worth someones while to pay your way. Your an Eagle (almost) if you put your mind to it, I be you will figure a way.

I’m aware, I probably will most likely obtain my CNA certification (in senior year), work as one throughout college and then after college most likely volunteer on a squad.

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Just now, ItsBrian said:

I’m aware, I probably will most likely obtain my CNA certification (in senior year), work as one throughout college and then after college most likely volunteer on a squad.

Sounds like a great plan. Best of luck!

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10 minutes ago, ItsBrian said:

As said in other threads, I’m in a Vocational HS for the health field and I graduate as a CNA. I plan on getting my masters and going into occupational therapy, and have 0 plans on going into the emergency field haha.

Ive been tempted to volunteer on a local squad and having them pay for EMT though.

How many and what kind of patient contact hours do you have? You may find that some college academic programs require 200hr, 500hr, or more minimum hours for admission.  An on-call EMT acquires those hours based on calls not shift hours.

Our Health Assisting students seek volunteer opportunities at local hospitals and health care facilities, particularly senior centers and special ed.

It is a great way to "help others" and a good way to verify  that OT is your future.

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18 minutes ago, RememberSchiff said:

How many and what kind of patient contact hours do you have? You may find that some college academic programs require 200hr, 500hr, or more minimum hours for admission.  An on-call EMT acquires those hours based on calls not shift hours.

Our Health Assisting students seek volunteer opportunities at local hospitals and health care facilities, particularly senior centers and special ed.

It is a great way to "help others" and a good way to verify  that OT is your future.

 

I have atleast 100 hours, and for most OT programs they require around 200 of OT observation.

I’m soon to have patient contact of all types. Currently it’s elderly. I’ve been to nursing homes, assisted living centers, and adult day care centers. I start clinical at a child day care in March.

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On 1/28/2018 at 4:22 PM, Back Pack said:

With which groups. There are many groups that offer wfa and I have taken it twice which was taught two very different ways. I know bsa works with ecsi but their course is different from the Red Cross which is different from nols. 

I just completed the Red Cross version of WFA and found it to be more of a First Aid refresher with an introduction to triage, and very theoretical. I was hoping for a more in-depth experience showing how to adapt to situations where you may not have all the resources you'd like, and ways to improvise. Additionally, our instructors kept skipping over certain skills shown in the handouts saying that Red Cross no longer required them, which was confusing and occasionally contradictory.

So, my question is which flavor of WFA has provided the best overall experience?

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3 minutes ago, Rock Doc said:

So, my question is which flavor of WFA has provided the best overall experience?

The curriculum is standardized (available here: https://www.scouting.org/health-and-safety/training/wilderness-fa/).  I have taken it through both ARC and ECSI and their courses both (mostly) follow that document.

The delivery can vary significantly due to instructors though.  One time we mostly sat at the table and talked through everything - very minimal hands-on practice.  Another time it was put on by a Crew who specializes in wilderness medicine.  Most everything was a hands-on scenario.

 

 

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