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Virtual Campfire

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3 hours ago, ianwilkins said:

Some Dutch don't like the Germans either. Or maybe they are fed up with Brits thinking they're German as Dutch sounds a bit German if you don't know either language that well. They bridle somewhat. You can normally tell they're Dutch as they'll have something orange on. Or if you're on a campsite in France, probably better to assume they're dutch. I'm convinced Holland must be empty in the summer as almost every campsite we go to is chockablock with Dutch.

I seem to meet nice friendly people wherever I go from whatever country. I think there's a parable about that, or maybe an apocryphal tale. Something about an old man on the road from one town to another.

When we were in the UK in the summer of '13 you couldn't swing a cat in London without hitting a dutch scout troop. I liked 'em. Pretty informal but a cheerful group of campers.

The French High Schoolers were insufferable; (1) they were high schoolers (2) a different sense of personal space and hygiene and (3) mocked everything they saw (maybe that is maybe still (1))

The Germans scouts were pretty pushy and would crowd past folks in line but with a firm command they would acquiesce and back in the queue. Some old Scot woman I was with in line whispered "Very well done, got to keep a firm hand with them." I did enjoy talking some scouty stuff with them.

It was an interesting trip.

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On 2/2/2018 at 8:29 AM, Tampa Turtle said:

The Germans scouts were pretty pushy and would crowd past folks in line but with a firm command they would acquiesce and back in the queue. Some old Scot woman I was with in line whispered "Very well done, got to keep a firm hand with them." I did enjoy talking some scouty stuff with them.

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I have a question.   How many scout leaders out there that either have home-schooled children of their own or have home-school kids in their units?  How does that influence what's going on?   Okay, that's two questions.  Mea culpa.

 

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9 hours ago, Pselb said:

I have a question.   How many scout leaders out there that either have home-schooled children of their own or have home-school kids in their units?  How does that influence what's going on?   Okay, that's two questions.  Mea culpa.

 

We do. The fact some scouts are home-schooled doesn't influence anything as a result. We have public school scouts, and private school scouts too. One could not tell them apart. The schooling choice of the parents has no apparent influence.

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Thanks, that's good to know.  With all the conversation about how school activities affect participation in scouts, I just thought it might be different than with those home-school kids that have a more flexible schedule.

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10 hours ago, Pselb said:

I have a question.   How many scout leaders out there that either have home-schooled children of their own or have home-school kids in their units?  How does that influence what's going on?   Okay, that's two questions.  Mea culpa.

 

This is my 14th year of homeschooling my boys.  They both participated as much or as little as they want - it's their choice.  Older son earned his Eagle about 3 years ago, and the younger is one merit badge away from his.  The only real influence I see is that by homeschooling & not working, as a leader in the troop I'm usually available to head up outings and opportunities that other working leaders might not have the chance to do (high adventure, daytime activities, etc).  

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For what it's worth, my boys all four of them were homeschooled, started in 1990, finished in 2014.

When we started we were the only homeschooling family in the troop so yeah it was a little odd for him not to have any friends from school  so it took a little longer to break the ice and fit in. that seemed to the only real difference.

Except that when they started singing silly songs from Veggie Tales at campfires the other Scouts had never heard them before bought my boys had made them up and consider them to be musical geniuses

For the time we finished about a third of the troop was home-schooled.  So at that point there was no difference whatsoever.

 

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I've lurked for a few years as my boy came up through a couple of years in Cub Scouts.  Now that he's getting older and has stayed interested in Cubs, next year Webelos, I thought it okay to get a bit more involved on the forum.  I'm not a eat, drink and sleep Scouting volunteer so does that warrant the red arrow judgements for my comments about it?  Just wondering because when I was lurking it didn't make any difference.  If my offering a parents perspective in is a problem, I can surely go back to lurking.  What seems to be the tradition on this?  Just curious.  I can stay off  if this is a problem.  My boy's fine with the way things are so I can go back to the way it was for me.

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Pselb, you are just as free to express your perspective as anyone else.  And others are free to disagree with your perspective, as much as anyone else's.

But it would be helpful if everybody realized that there is a perspective other than their own, on almost every subject discussed in this forum.

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29 minutes ago, Pselb said:

I've lurked for a few years as my boy came up through a couple of years in Cub Scouts.  Now that he's getting older and has stayed interested in Cubs, next year Webelos, I thought it okay to get a bit more involved on the forum.  I'm not a eat, drink and sleep Scouting volunteer so does that warrant the red arrow judgements for my comments about it?  Just wondering because when I was lurking it didn't make any difference.  If my offering a parents perspective in is a problem, I can surely go back to lurking.  What seems to be the tradition on this?  Just curious.  I can stay off  if this is a problem.  My boy's fine with the way things are so I can go back to the way it was for me.

I'd say most folks here are parents as well as leaders. There are a good handful of folks who's kids are finished and too old for the program. There is an even smaller handful of us who are single or haven't started families yet. 

Your perspective on what you see in your program and from the BSA is a valuable perspective. I like to pick the brains of parents in my unit that are not volunteers. 

As for your question. We've had home schooled scouts in our unit. Often when they first join they aren't quite as socialized as some of the public or private school kids, but they adjust quickly. In my experience it hasn't influenced anything. 

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Scout Sunday good turn out. Both sons (18, 19) showed up in uniform as well. One of their old ASM's said we should call them "Cling-ons" and they could use a Klingon design for a patrol patch. I wish BSA would have a better option for 18-21 who want to stay in Scouting other than venturing. Not a lot but they can use the numbers.

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28 minutes ago, Sentinel947 said:

I'd say most folks here are parents as well as leaders. There are a good handful of folks who's kids are finished and too old for the program.

 

My English teacher friend would have fun with this one.  He'd be wondering if the kids are too old for the program or the leaders......  From some of the other comments over the years, it's hard to tell.  :) 

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Virtual Campfire . . . What would B - P say about this?  No dancing flames to gaze into....  No warm radiance to utilize ...  What to do with the "Campfire Ash Tradition"?  

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