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Stosh

Virtual Campfire

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I think if it was me, I'd put a note in the Virtual Campfire letting everyone there know I was starting a separate thread because the conversation got interesting and would be good to share outside of I&P.

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On 1/12/2018 at 5:18 PM, NJCubScouter said:

Stosh, is there a topic in this thread?  I am not sure that one can be on-topic OR off-topic, if there is no topic at all.

 

On 1/12/2018 at 5:20 PM, Sentinel947 said:

He's making an off-topic thread. I'm actually kind of curious what kind of thread this could be. 

Sort of the Seinfeld of threads. A thread with a topic about no topic.

One question. Who is playing Kramer?

 

 

 

Edited by HelpfulTracks
  • Haha 1

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I think with the bunch here, we'd have to take applications for that position, I don't know if I could pick just one.  @HelpfulTracks, are you applying?

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On 1/12/2018 at 11:13 PM, LeCastor said:

Yeah, it was pretty cool!  And I got some sweet patches there.

On 1/12/2018 at 10:54 PM, Stosh said:

Does anyone have any inside scoop on why GBB gets a tad bit of recognition in the Scouting magazine after the long snub he's gotten?

 

On 1/12/2018 at 11:06 PM, LeCastor said:

It's really cool that a whole new generation of Scouters are getting exposed to Bill's legacy now that he has that nice write-up in Scouting.  If any Forum readers haven't read this article I encourage you to do so.  Then, if you want to know more, read Nelson Block's biography here.  Then, find yourself a copy of the 1st edition Field Book and get to reading!  You'll be glad you did.

Neat story....sort of.

I met GBB at the 1981 NSJ.

One of my troop mates grabbed me to go see Green Bar Bill, I recognized the name but was not fully aware of who he was. Apparently, neither was my troop mate because when i asked he replied he wrote our handbook. So we grabbed a couple of newly minted handbooks and went off the get them signed. We waited patiently as he talked to some other folks and signed autographs. Once we had them signed we ran off to do fun Scouting things. 

It was not until much later that I realized who GBB REALLY was and his significance to Scouting. I say "sort of" above because had I know more about who he was I probably would have stuck around and talked to him more and listened to him much more. But I was young, so maybe I wouldn't have. Who knows.

I still have that handbook and it is now one of my most treasured Scouting items.

 

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15 minutes ago, Stosh said:

I think with the bunch here, we'd have to take applications for that position, I don't know if I could pick just one.  @HelpfulTracks, are you applying?

I could never be that funny!

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4 hours ago, DuctTape said:

I have the individual books. I did not know that about Rockwell.

I discovered that my info is slightly inaccurate, as Rockwell did a couple of very early illustrations for two other books just prior to the Cave books, though they appear to have been just illustrations and not the myriad examples throughout the Scouting related books.  Many of the drawings are simple line type and have his initials on them.  Of course, that was when he was acting as Boy's Life art editor.  He also did illustrations for a number of the Every Boy's Library volumes according to one researcher's details.  There is little doubt in my mind that Rockwell's work had a very big influence on the public acceptance of the formative decades and the hay day of the fifties and sixties.

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2 hours ago, skeptic said:

I discovered that my info is slightly inaccurate, as Rockwell did a couple of very early illustrations for two other books just prior to the Cave books, though they appear to have been just illustrations and not the myriad examples throughout the Scouting related books.  Many of the drawings are simple line type and have his initials on them.  Of course, that was when he was acting as Boy's Life art editor.  He also did illustrations for a number of the Every Boy's Library volumes according to one researcher's details.  There is little doubt in my mind that Rockwell's work had a very big influence on the public acceptance of the formative decades and the hay day of the fifties and sixties.

I just got home and looked at my two books. I attached a photo of a title page with the Rockwell Illustration on the previous page. I had looked at the illustrations in the past, but never noticed they were N. Rockwell. Thanks for the info.

0115181510.jpg

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5 hours ago, skeptic said:

I discovered that my info is slightly inaccurate, as Rockwell did a couple of very early illustrations for two other books just prior to the Cave books, though they appear to have been just illustrations and not the myriad examples throughout the Scouting related books.  Many of the drawings are simple line type and have his initials on them.  Of course, that was when he was acting as Boy's Life art editor.  He also did illustrations for a number of the Every Boy's Library volumes according to one researcher's details.  There is little doubt in my mind that Rockwell's work had a very big influence on the public acceptance of the formative decades and the hay day of the fifties and sixties.

The two books from the Scouting EVERY BOYS' LIBRARY that Rockwell illustrated are "Scouting with Daniel Boone" and "Don Strong of the Wolf Patrol".

Other Interesting books from the EBL collection are "Crooked Trails" written by Frederick Remington, and of course, illustrated by him.  Same for Zane Grey's "The Last of the Plainsmen".  Grey used photographs to illustrate his book. "Handicraft for Boys" and "Boat Building and Boating" were written and illustrated by Dan Beard (D. C. Beard).  "Biography of a Grizzly" was written by Ernest Thompson Seton and illustrated by his wife Grace.  This comes as a surprise in that Seton was an award winning wildlife illustrator. I guess like every good scouter, one has to keep the Mrs. happy.

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Oil change?   What's that?    I visited a garage once, the mechanic. had a bench covered with engine parts, a Pontiac Sunbird was parked nearby with it's hood leaning against the wall.  I asked about this "display".  He said the young woman had brought the car in because it was "making noise"  . She had bought it new , three years before, put 24,000 or so miles on it and had NEVER changed the oil......  

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I knew a guy who drove a car 45,000 miles and just kept adding more and more oil as needed.  He sold it in running condition.  Be thankful you didn't buy it.

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I had a 1975 Ford Maverick - inherited it from my sister - when I finally got rid of it by calling Victory Auto Parts (Yeah - I got a whole $35 for it), the tow truck driver took it in to the street, drained the oil, then spent the next 30 minutes revving the engine trying to get it to seize.  The drivers were having a contest 0 the first person to get a Maverick to seize within 30 minutes won $100.  Apparently Mavericks had a bit of a reputation for loose pistons.

I had a Ford Explorer Sport Trac - I traded it in with 225K miles on it - I changed the oil regularly - just don't tell my mechanic that regularly was about once every 75K miles.

Now  I change the oil as soon as the car yells at me to change the oil.

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It is recommended that one change the oil every 3,000 miles.  Like that's going to make it easy to keep track of.  So I change my oil every 5,000 miles.  That's easy to keep track of.

1) '74 Chevy Nova 78,000 miles

2) '87 Dodge Class-B Camper 115,000 miles

3) '98 Saturn 155,000 miles

4) '06 Honda CR-V 198,000 miles

5) '04 Ford F-150 220,000 miles

The Mrs. wants a new CR-V.    I might have to break down and get her one.  She says the new ones have more features and cup holders. 

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2 hours ago, Stosh said:

The two books from the Scouting EVERY BOYS' LIBRARY that Rockwell illustrated are "Scouting with Daniel Boone" and "Don Strong of the Wolf Patrol".

Other Interesting books from the EBL collection are "Crooked Trails" written by Frederick Remington, and of course, illustrated by him.  Same for Zane Grey's "The Last of the Plainsmen".  Grey used photographs to illustrate his book. "Handicraft for Boys" and "Boat Building and Boating" were written and illustrated by Dan Beard (D. C. Beard).  "Biography of a Grizzly" was written by Ernest Thompson Seton and illustrated by his wife Grace.  This comes as a surprise in that Seton was an award winning wildlife illustrator. I guess like every good scouter, one has to keep the Mrs. happy.

And the Biography of a Grizzly is also the only EBL in the format in which it is done.  I read that was insisted on by Seton, but not sure why.

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14 minutes ago, CalicoPenn said:

I had a 1975 Ford Maverick - inherited it from my sister - when I finally got rid of it by calling Victory Auto Parts (Yeah - I got a whole $35 for it), the tow truck driver took it in to the street, drained the oil, then spent the next 30 minutes revving the engine trying to get it to seize.  The drivers were having a contest 0 the first person to get a Maverick to seize within 30 minutes won $100.  Apparently Mavericks had a bit of a reputation for loose pistons.

I had a Ford Explorer Sport Trac - I traded it in with 225K miles on it - I changed the oil regularly - just don't tell my mechanic that regularly was about once every 75K miles.

Now  I change the oil as soon as the car yells at me to change the oil.

I had a '70 Maverick ($1,995 new) the floorboards gave out before the engine. 

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