Jump to content
SCOUTER Forum
Sign in to follow this  
5thGenTexan

Scouters With Anxiety?

Recommended Posts

Today was the deadline so I went ahead enrolled for university of scouting in a few weeks.  My CM knows I'm nuts, and there is another more experienced DL with anxiety issues.  So, at least it's not my little secret within the organization.  Anyway my CM just happens to be in my first class and we will have lunch at the same time.  I have my emergency meds from previous flare ups so I may just take a small dose to calm me down enough to get through the morning.  I feel like I should be fine after that.  I walked in the Christmas parade this past weekend in spite of the weak legs. Once we got going and my mind was on keeping boys from straggling I was fine.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now, now, you're not "nuts."   You sound at least as sane as about half the people I know.  Of course, most of the people I know have some sort of anxiety, OCD or other issues as well.  :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, 5thGenTexan said:

I walked in the Christmas parade this past weekend in spite of the weak legs. Once we got going and my mind was on keeping boys from straggling I was fine.

Yes, it's amazing how the sight of an eight-year-old coming dangerously close to being trampled by the high school marching band, or run over by a firetruck, will focus the mind.  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had mild panic attacks over the years and found that the more one focuses on them the more they appear and get stronger.

When I took the training for EMT, when the pager would go off, all kinds of bells and red flags would go off.  I'm thinking that is pretty much normal.  Yet once on the scene and focused on the task at hand, those "butterflies" just go away.   Now, with that being said, when certain people are involved in the tragedy, AFTERWARDS can be a real problem.  Helping a young child, the elderly, etc. evoke strong reactions to the situation afterwards.  When such things happen, the drive home with shaky hands and adrenaline pumping through your veins can be quite a challenge.  I guess it just comes down to when I decide it's okay to react.  It's not that hard to actually do that with practice.

In a "tense" or "awkward" situation where anxiety starts it's onset, I recognize it and actually make the decision to postpone it and focus instead on the task at hand.  Letting it go until later is a learnable process.  I've got these kids, and I have a responsibility to them to stay focused on them, not me and my emotions.  Later, if I so choose I will take some down-time to think about it and usually I find myself thinking that all that anxiety wasn't necessary at the time.

Yes, we can choose to control our emotions, they don't just happen.  Imagine if you will, you are at the mall window shopping and all of a sudden someone pushes you against the store window.  The first reaction is going to be intense anger at the clumsy oaf that pushed you.  So you spin around and have both barrels loaded with what any normal sailor would have to say on the subject..... only to find a gentlemen standing there with a white cane in his hand.  He says, "I'm so sorry, these crowds are a real challenge for me."  At which point, you realize you are not at all angry.  It speaks volumes when it comes to anger issues in our society, when one realizes they are all controllable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×