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Cambridgeskip

WSJ 2019 selection

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Ask anything you want, just mke sure it's in a foreign language and see how they respond. Ask them where the wc is or what a pancake is. If they have fun with it they're good. Frustrated, not so much. If they start frustrated, you explain what's happening and then they have fun with it, they're also good.

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Ask anything you want, just mke sure it's in a foreign language and see how they respond. Ask them where the wc is or what a pancake is. If they have fun with it they're good. Frustrated, not so much. If they start frustrated, you explain what's happening and then they have fun with it, they're also good.

Matt - That is a genius idea, thank you!

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So..... just back from the selection weekend.

 

As it happens in the end the questions for the interview set were dictated from further up the food chain so I didn't get to be creative.

 

I will say though that this was one of the hardest decisions I've ever been involved in. A panel of 5 of us had to get 18 scouts and explorers down to just 6. The standard of human beings in front of us was extraordinary and having to say no to some of them was frankly heart breaking. That's life I guess.

 

You will though be having 6 outstanding young people from one corner of england joining you in 2 years time!

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Applications from USA are now being accepted: https://wsj2019.us/apply/In addition to your scouting resume, it also asks for a $250 early-bird deposit.

Some details on selection process on Bryan's blog: https://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2017/11/01/2019-world-scout-jamboree-registration-is-now-live/

 

Interestingly, it calls out to your my.scouting.org account for confirmation.

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And there's the first of many cultural differences, though maybe I'm just old fashioned, but the first picture has a kid front and centre (sic) with a two fingered salute. Maybe global cultural homogenisation has ruled the day, but in th UK of my youth, it was similar to the middle digit salute, but not as severe. I'm probably just not down with da kids. And quite right too. Not that it matters, it's a US blog for US people, but it highlights a point. :)

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And there's the first of many cultural differences, though maybe I'm just old fashioned, but the first picture has a kid front and centre (sic) with a two fingered salute. Maybe global cultural homogenisation has ruled the day, but in th UK of my youth, it was similar to the middle digit salute, but not as severe. I'm probably just not down with da kids. And quite right too. Not that it matters, it's a US blog for US people, but it highlights a point. :)

 

As I assume you realize, the kids in that photo are definitely not from the US.  I do not know where they are from.  It's kind of interesting, the BSA has done everything they can to get almost every hint of red out of the Boy Scout uniform (supposedly because the boys "don't like wearing red") and here are these kids from somewhere wearing red uniform shirts.

 

There are two kids who are the focus of this photo.  The one with the hat (I'm assuming that's a girl but I'm not betting any money on it) is holding up two fingers on each hand.  Two fingers is part of the Cub Scout sign (unless they changed it when they replaced the Cub Scout Promise with the Scout Oath), the other part being that your arm is vertical-ish, which hers are not, and you only do it with one hand.  Otherwise, two fingers means "Peace" (more popular in the 60's and 70's but still recognized) and "V for Victory", although that usage (from WW2 I assume) is declining.  Two fingers does not have any negative connotations in the US that I am aware of.

 

The other kid is holding up two fingers with his right hand but I am not sure what he is doing with his left hand.   It could be a version of the "heavy metal" symbol (index finger and pinky), but that could very well have yet another connotation in whatever country he is from.

 

Added note:  Here is an article about the "V" sign and its meaning in different countries:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V_sign   Since it is from Wikipedia, it is not guaranteed to be correct, but it looks ok.  Apparently the insulting version of the sign as used in the UK and other countries, but generally not in the US, is made with the palm facing inward.  The US versions, either V-for-victory or the peace sign (or the Cub Scout sign) are made with the palm facing outward.  Added added:  I especially like the part in the Wikipedia article in which our 41st president was visiting Australia and attempted to give the "peace sign" but did it backward, thus accidentally giving the insulting two-finger salute to a group of Australian farmers.

Edited by NJCubScouter

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I hope they get advised that it might be an idea to get one for the jamboree, or rather, two or three or four. Swapping neckers is a thing. Though there's a sliding scale of desirability, I'd guess that a US necker or a UK necker, or one of the other big contingents, would be low desireability, while one from, say, Senegal, would be extremely sought after.

 

My best trade at the 2017 NSJ was my silky blue Jamboree neckerchief and big shiny slide for a Madagascar Scout's neckerchief and woggle.  I traded a lot of patches, gave most of them to my son but this was one for my collection. 

 

I would imagine, from the USA something like an Eagle Scout neckerchief would trade a little better than many of the other things.

 

I've also been told that entire uniforms get traded.  There are still many NSOs with uniforms.  My son really wants to make this kind of trade. 

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I searched for French Scouting uniforms and did not see any that color.  Maybe Scouts Canada?  http://thirdottawa.com/uniforms/

 

And this:  http://wiki.scouts.ca/en/File:Insignia-placement-RoverScouts.png 

 

But I see nothing there about painting your face in the colors of the French flag.  Perhaps the young man in question had just met a female Scout from France and this was his way of expressing his admiration?

Edited by NJCubScouter

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I searched for French Scouting uniforms and did not see any that color.  Maybe Scouts Canada?  http://thirdottawa.com/uniforms/

 

And this:  http://wiki.scouts.ca/en/File:Insignia-placement-RoverScouts.png 

 

But I see nothing there about painting your face in the colors of the French flag.  Perhaps the young man in question had just met a female Scout from France and this was his way of expressing his admiration?

 

 

Maybe French Canadian? :)

 

I've only met one branch of French scouts (there's three as I understand it), and theirs was a very pleasing pale blue.

 

I feel slightly foolish, as with a momentary pause for thought I would have realised they weren't BSA uniforms. I *know* that aren't BSA uniforms, well not ones I've seen so...momentary brain fade.

 

Back to the downward V sign. Closest I've got is a description as "an archaic gang symbol used by Japanese girls, Gangstas, and white people posing for photos who'll never be gangstas." Maybe I'll ask my Explorers tonight, but I only ever see them do it when they pose for photos. :)

Edited by ianwilkins

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