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WSJ 2019 selection

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So.... I've been asked to be an out of county member of the panel that is selecting participants for WSJ 2019 in another county here in the UK. It's being done over a weekend in October so plenty of time to prepare.

 

One part of it is an interview. There's a good deal of guidance about what to look for etc which of course I'll be sticking to but there does appear to be room to be creative at this stage with questions. So as host country I thought I'd get some ideas from yourselves as to questions to ask. I can't guarantee to use them as I may well yet be given more guidance to follow! But for curiosity what do you think I should be asking.....

 

Fire away.

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Is this for interviewing Scouts, or staff?

 

A good question is always "Why do you want to go?"  There is not necessarily a right or wrong answer, it's mainly to see if they have a reason and are able to articulate it.  I think anyone, whether youth or staff, will get more out of an experience if they know what it is they are looking for from the experience.

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"Can you tie a friendship knot?"

"If you met a clueless Yank, how would you teach him/her a friendship knot?"

"If you were to challenge a Yank by throwing down your necker, how would you spare him or her the embarrassment of not having one?"

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"If you were to challenge a Yank by throwing down your necker, how would you spare him or her the embarrassment of not having one?"

 

Maybe I am naive, but would an American Scout really go to a World Jamboree, or any large gathering of Scouts, without a neckerchief?  All the kids in my troop wear neckerchiefs, it is considered part of a complete uniform.  I believe the same is true for all troops in my area, though admittedly it has been awhile since I attended a Camporee or other district-wide event with Scouts.

 

On occasion a Scout will forget his neckerchief at home, but I can't imagine one of our Scouts not taking a neckerchief to a National or World Jamboree.  I think for the 2013 Jamboree, our one Scout who went was provided by the council with a special council-specific neckerchief.

Edited by NJCubScouter

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Maybe I am naive, but would an American Scout really go to a World Jamboree, or any large gathering of Scouts, without a neckerchief?  All the kids in my troop wear neckerchiefs, it is considered part of a complete uniform.  I believe the same is true for all troops in my area, though admittedly it has been awhile since I attended a Camporee or other district-wide event with Scouts.

 

On occasion a Scout will forget his neckerchief at home, but I can't imagine one of our Scouts not taking a neckerchief to a National or World Jamboree.  I think for the 2013 Jamboree, our one Scout who went was provided by the council with a special council-specific neckerchief.

Insert my "It's a big country" rant here.

For reasons discussed elsewhere, we may see the occasional American at Jambo forgo neckerchiefs where scouts from other associations wouldn't be caught dead without them.

But, I certainly hope that many of our visitors to World Jambo will have time for extended visits to camps and scout houses throughout Canada, the US, and Mexico.

 

The goal of the question is to get a scout thinking on how they would handle something/someone who doesn't have the same expectations as he/she does. This is not has hard when two people don't speak the same language or dress radically differently. Something goes of in the brain that accepts the fact that there be a wide range of things to sort out when communicating, so don't get hung up on small stuff. But when two people look and talk similarly, all of a sudden differences in manners "glare". You might rather send us your scouts prepared to handle those difference with friendliness and courtesy.

 

In other words, it's not about the nail necker...

Edited by qwazse

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Insert my "It's a big country" rant here.

For reasons discussed elsewhere, we may see the occasional American at Jambo forgo neckerchiefs where scouts from other associations wouldn't be caught dead without them.

I hope they get advised that it might be an idea to get one for the jamboree, or rather, two or three or four. Swapping neckers is a thing. Though there's a sliding scale of desirability, I'd guess that a US necker or a UK necker, or one of the other big contingents, would be low desireability, while one from, say, Senegal, would be extremely sought after.

As the only UK group at our first foreign jamboree this summer, it was an eye opener!

 

But, I certainly hope that many of our visitors to World Jambo will have time for extended visits to camps and scout houses throughout Canada, the US, and Mexico.

I certainly hope so. That's the plan for the UK contingent I'm pretty sure. I know the Home Hospitality at the last one, one of ours stayed with a Japanese scout and family and she said it was one of the highlights, just to spend time living as the Japanese do. Lucky thing.

 

Actually, we've got our selection in a few weeks too. And I'm thinking I should try and give it a little flavour of the hosting countries. Whether that be food or games or what I don't know, but if anyone has any ideas, I'm all ears...

Edited by ianwilkins

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Maybe I am naive, but would an American Scout really go to a World Jamboree, or any large gathering of Scouts, without a neckerchief?  All the kids in my troop wear neckerchiefs, it is considered part of a complete uniform.  I believe the same is true for all troops in my area, though admittedly it has been awhile since I attended a Camporee or other district-wide event with Scouts.

 

On occasion a Scout will forget his neckerchief at home, but I can't imagine one of our Scouts not taking a neckerchief to a National or World Jamboree.  I think for the 2013 Jamboree, our one Scout who went was provided by the council with a special council-specific neckerchief.

 

 

Neckerchief is optional. Page 4.

 

http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/33066(15)_Web-4.pdf

 

 

Boy Scout neckerchiefs are optional.

Troops choose their own official neckerchief.

All members of a troop wear the same color.

The troop decides by vote, and all members

abide by the decision. If the neckerchief is not

worn, then the shirt is worn with open collar.

Boy Scout and Boy Scout leader neckerchiefs

may be worn in a variety of plain colors and

contrasting borders.

 

 

Our cub scout pack stopped wearing (and buying them) when my son was either a Wolf or a Bear to cut down on the cost and make scouting more affordable - as well as the fact that the two major boy scout troops in our area already didn't wear them either as a required item.

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Neckerchief is optional. Page 4.

 

http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/33066(15)_Web-4.pdf

 

 

Boy Scout neckerchiefs are optional.

Troops choose their own official neckerchief.

All members of a troop wear the same color.

The troop decides by vote, and all members

abide by the decision. If the neckerchief is not

worn, then the shirt is worn with open collar.

Boy Scout and Boy Scout leader neckerchiefs

may be worn in a variety of plain colors and

contrasting borders.

 

 

Our cub scout pack stopped wearing (and buying them) when my son was either a Wolf or a Bear to cut down on the cost and make scouting more affordable - as well as the fact that the two major boy scout troops in our area already didn't wear them either as a required item.

For WSJ you'll probably find they all get given an event one, colour coded between youth and adults, that will be compulsory to wear while there. So teach someone how to tie one may be a good question!

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Much as I hate to admit it.

Even though the site of the Jamboree is not far from where I live, to date I have not been there.

To add to my ignorance I have to admit to not knowing anything about the 2019 event.

 

I will however add my two cents.

 

Back in 1975, I was one of the Assistant Scout Leaders for the Greater London Central contingent for the WSJ in Norway.

Back then I was very young and think that my selection had more to do with not only my willingness to attend but with my being a very good friend of the son of the then County Commissioner. 

The event was being hosted by the five Nordic countries and we spent the first week in Sweden.

The people who were doing the Home Hospitality were a church group who had little or no exposure to Scouts and Scouting.

There was one very embarrassing night when we all gathered in a church hall and were expected to sing for the congregation.

Not the type of thing a group of Lads from Central London and the East of London boys were really into !!

I have to admit that the family that got stuck with me, were really nice. I learned a lot and the exposure to just the different attitudes made a lasting impression.

We still exchange Christmas cards.

The event itself seemed to go by very fast.

A great deal of the time was spent visiting Scouts from different parts of the world.

Inviting Scouts to tea and cookies (The County Commissioner worked for United Biscuits and we had an endless supply of biscuits /cookies.)

There was a hike with mixed patrols Scouts from different countries.

And of course there was a fantastic firework display.

 

I was involved in two BSA National Jamborees at Fort AP Hill as Scoutmaster for one of the two Troops that made up our Council contingent.

The Scouts who seemed to get the most out of these events were the boys who were willing to try new things and meet new people.

Sadly the patch trading did become a bit of an issue, however after a few days the supply of patches started to run dry and even the die hard patch traders became more involved in what was going on around them.

 

I had every intention of attending the 2007 WSJ.

I was on the selection team from our Area Committee.

My reason for not going was the cost !!

Which for my son and myself would have been over ten thousand dollars.

 

As a rule (But not always!) Kids who can find the cash needed to attend an event as costly as a Jamboree do tend to be the type that are really into Scouts and Scouting.

It is worth thinking about and remembering that "We" never know what a boy or girl will take away from such an event.

While we might like the idea that he or she will be a wonderful ambassador for wherever he or she might come from.

The event is for them and not about being a advertisement for us.

 

Selecting adult leaders can be a real challenge.

In part because so few are needed.

While maybe the easy path is to choose someone who has served in the past and done a good job.

I would sooner offer the opportunity to someone new.

I got a fair number of applications from older Scouters who seemed to want to add yet another Jamboree to their belt!

Finding a youth leader who has the flexibility deal with both a group that needs to become a unit and what might be new and different circumstances than he or she is used to at home, can be hard.

I'd be looking for someone that is very understanding, works well with youth members and has their respect.

 

Eamonn 

   

  

 

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Neckers were a mandatory part of the uniform for 2017 NSJ, and I am told they will be for WSJ.

 

That said, field uniforms were only required for 2 of the 3 shows and for religious services. Most scouts, US and visiting countries, were in activity uniforms most of the time. The  majority of Scouts wore the necker when in field uniform.

 

At NSJ, World neckers were in high demand because there were at lest 10 to 1 ratio maybe more like 20-1) of US to World contingents. Also, some World contingents were limited to how many neckers they could get, others were not, it was dependent on the country.

 

At WSJ I think the US neckers will be in somewhat of a high demand because it is the home country, which everyone wants. I think that US neckers will not suffer too much from over supply considering they will only be approximately 5% of the attendees,

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Questions to ask:

 

What does representing your country mean to you?

What do you think you can teach other scouts about your culture?

How would you reflect Baden-Powell's vision of world unity among scouts?

What are you looking forward to least about WSJ?

How will you use your WSJ experience to promote scouting when you return?

What are your future scouting plans?

 

I Am not sure if World contingents are under the same NO TOUR restrictions as US, but if not -- What do you most look forward to seeing in the US?

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Every time I see "WSJ" in this thread I have to remind myself that it does not stand for the Wall Street Journal, which is what it has stood for almost every other time I have seen it in my life.  :)

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Maybe I am naive, but would an American Scout really go to a World Jamboree, or any large gathering of Scouts, without a neckerchief?  All the kids in my troop wear neckerchiefs, it is considered part of a complete uniform.  I believe the same is true for all troops in my area, though admittedly it has been awhile since I attended a Camporee or other district-wide event with Scouts.

 

On occasion a Scout will forget his neckerchief at home, but I can't imagine one of our Scouts not taking a neckerchief to a National or World Jamboree.  I think for the 2013 Jamboree, our one Scout who went was provided by the council with a special council-specific neckerchief.

My 2013 Jambo contingent chose bolo ties over neckers.

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The proper spelling of neighbor and utilize?

Which condiments are appropriate for hot dogs and sausages?  (Hint, if it's red it better be chili!)

In the event a bear or coyote wanders into your campsite, how many of  your mates is it appropriate to trip to ensure a safe escape?

:)

 

I supposed I'd be most interested in what they are most and least looking forward to to doing/enduring.  Which cultures they're most interested in learning more about.  That sort of thing.

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Neckers were a mandatory part of the uniform for 2017 NSJ, and I am told they will be for WSJ.

 

That said, field uniforms were only required for 2 of the 3 shows and for religious services. Most scouts, US and visiting countries, were in activity uniforms most of the time. ...,

But that's the difference isn't it? In some parts, an t-shirt does not become an activity uniform until worn with a necker:

WSJ-2015-neckerchiefs.jpg?resize=678%2C3

At least I think that's why BSA tried to get us to warm up to the idea two years ago.

Will there really be a higher expectation that everyone will have neckers on hand if not over shoulders? I don't know.

But I do know that new arrivals from English-speaking countries will expect to be readily understood, and it might give a scout grief if he or she is not challenged to prepare for a bump or two. On the other hand, if a scout gets a couple mental exercises about recovering when things get lost in translation, he or she will more likely enjoy the differences.

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