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RememberSchiff

Penn State Pro Wellness at Bashore Scout Reservation (PA)

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So places like Whole Foods are not allowed to sell healthy food then if that’s what you’re implying? What if that’s the closest store to me? They’re forcing me to buy stuff...

Just a thought

Again, another straw man not germane to the topic of educating Scouts about nutrition versus limiting their choices and forcing compliance on a Scout setting.

 

When we do menu planning does your unit override the patrols' choices and force them to eat well? Or do you teach them the right things and then let them practice it themselves? If the latter, then why wouldn't you do that at summer camp?

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When we do menu planning does your unit override the patrols' choices and force them to eat well? Or do you teach them the right things and then let them practice it themselves? If the latter, then why wouldn't you do that at summer camp?

 

Absolutely, we check them and follow the nutritional guidelines stated in their handbooks.  Otherwise,  what is the point in teaching nutrition and cooking if they are not meeting  the expectations of the Scouting program .

 

We have an ASM who approves menus and another who is available to assist in shopping within the patrol budget, less some Scout thought buying food at Whole Paycheck was a good idea.

 

:)

Edited by RememberSchiff
clarity

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Absolutely, we check them and follow the nutritional guidelines stated in their handbooks.  Otherwise,  what is the point in teaching nutrition and cooking if they are not meeting our expectations. We have an ASM who approves menus and another who is available to assist in shopping within the patrol budget, less some Scout thought buying food at Whole Paycheck was a good idea.

 

:)

Same for my troop, we always make sure to follow the nutrition guidelines. It still may not be the best food for you to eat, but it’s netter then having a pound of bacon. Example, we do scrambled eggs, toast, and a piece or two of porkroll (if not from NJ might not know what this is). And we never make too much like some troops do, which causes Scouts to get seconds 5 times.

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Porkroll you get a +1 for that alone. Now if you had said scrapple too you would be a JASM.  :)

Edited by RememberSchiff

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Absolutely, we check them and follow the nutritional guidelines stated in their handbooks.  Otherwise,  what is the point in teaching nutrition and cooking if they are not meeting  the expectations of the Scouting program .

 

We have an ASM who approves menus and another who is available to assist in shopping within the patrol budget, less some Scout thought buying food at Whole Paycheck was a good idea.

 

:)

So ASMs override what the boys want?

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So ASMs override what the boys want?

 

If scouts, PL, and SPL  fail to follow the nutrition guidelines (MyPlate) in their handbook OR they did not consider food allergies in their patrol,  then ASM will not approve the menu, reminders given, and back to the drawing board.  Ditto for shopping in checking ingredients, cost, food packaging and storage.

 

We don't want the wrong food spoiling an outing for anybody. :(

Edited by RememberSchiff

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If scouts, PL, and SPL  fail to follow the nutrition guidelines (MyPlate) in their handbook OR they did not consider food allergies in their patrol,  then ASM will not approve the menu, reminders given, and back to the drawing board.  Ditto for shopping in checking ingredients, cost, food packaging and storage.

 

We don't want the wrong food spoiling an outing for anybody. :(

Yeah...well different strokes.

 

We train them and trust them. If they mess up they will learn their lesson. Allergies are one thing. Not approving because they have pop tarts instead of whole wheat toast robs them of the learning experience and youth leadership opportunity IMHO.

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Yeah...well different strokes.

We train them and trust them. If they mess up they will learn their lesson. Allergies are one thing. Not approving because they have pop tarts instead of whole wheat toast robs them of the learning experience and youth leadership opportunity IMHO.

Ok, we don’t go that extreme to where they need whole wheat. Just like instead of getting potato chips, get baked ones, but they taste just as good. We want the food to taste good.

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Yeah...well different strokes.

We train them and trust them. If they mess up they will learn their lesson. Allergies are one thing. Not approving because they have pop tarts instead of whole wheat toast robs them of the learning experience and youth leadership opportunity IMHO.

Ok, we don’t go that extreme to where they need whole wheat. Just like instead of getting potato chips, get baked ones, but they taste just as good. We want the food to taste good.

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Not approving because they have pop tarts instead of whole wheat toast robs them of the learning experience and youth leadership opportunity IMHO.

 

Funny you should mention Pop Tarts.  In my troop they have been banned as a camping trip menu item for many years - since before my time.

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Funny you should mention Pop Tarts.  In my troop they have been banned as a camping trip menu item for many years - since before my time.

When I took over as SM the ASMs gave me the "banned food list". I asked who put it together. It was the adults. I went to the PLC and gave it to them. I said they could ratify it or tear it up. At first they tore it up and went back to poor menu choices. Within two camp outs they realized they needed better food. Rather than create a list of banned foods (adult solution) they created a series of meetings where nutritionists, dietitians and three chefs came it to talk about food choices and cooking. It became a regular thing they do once a year now.

 

Have had a need to "ban" anything since. It's been 9 years. Train them, trust them, let them lead. Worked great...and best of all the ASMs that supported banning learned something too. :)

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When I took over as SM the ASMs gave me the "banned food list". I asked who put it together. It was the adults. I went to the PLC and gave it to them. I said they could ratify it or tear it up. At first they tore it up and went back to poor menu choices. Within two camp outs they realized they needed better food. Rather than create a list of banned foods (adult solution) they created a series of meetings where nutritionists, dietitians and three chefs came it to talk about food choices and cooking. It became a regular thing they do once a year now.

Have had a need to "ban" anything since. It's been 9 years. Train them, trust them, let them lead. Worked great...and best of all the ASMs that supported banning learned something too. :)

My troop doesn’t ban anything because they know what they should eat. Closest thing to banning someone was not making the same meal for three campouts in a row! Haha.

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UPDATE:

 

An ASM from my troop had explained to me that on a hot day that they had *stopped* selling ALL sugary drinks (soda, slushees, etc.) and only sold water.

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