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Shotgun age 14 and up only?

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Wow thanks for the speedy replies. Much appreciated. Yeah i understand why adults place some restrictions due to weight and height. However, I think every scout should be given a shot at trying shotgun if they want to. Isn't that what scouts is about? Giving them experiences and memories that they wouldn't get without scouts. Some memories will be good some not so good. If it hurt his shoulder then he would know not to ask again? I'm thankful for the merit badge counselor at camp telling me to let him shoot. My son is on the smaller side. He qualified for shotgun faster than anyone at camp. He hasn't stopped talking about trap shooting. We've taken him trap and skeet shooting every weekend since he's been home from camp. He is so excited about this new sport. He wouldn't have that without scouts. 

 

​My son was 12 when he earned the shotgun shooting merit badge at camp.  I think that camp restricted first years and required either the rifle shooting MB or hunter safety, this ensures that the class doesn't have any scouts who have never handled a firearm before.  Also, rifle shooting takes a lot less staff than shotgun shooting, so there may be a method there to keep classes from being overloaded. 

 

It will come down to what the shooting sports director is comfortable with on the grounds of safety, but there is also an element of not setting scouts up to fail.  Some camps restrict the water sports merit badge to older scouts, based mainly on success rate, small scouts with no water skiing experience rarely complete the badge, and don't have access to boats or lakes to finish it at home.  The same could be said for shotgun shooting.  I've seen 10 year olds that do quite well in my son's youth trap shooting league, but these are the exceptions, not the rule. 

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I had some folks look at me crazy last night when I was discussing sheath knives at a upcoming camporee. I actually had a parent pull up state law and attempted to say that sheath knives were illegal. I told him the key words to the law is "illegal to carry concealed."

 

The old sheath knife debate. 

 

...concealed... like, in a backpack?

 

another useless law

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Concealed on the person, i.e. under a coat, shirt, etc.  At least in NC. In a backpack would be considered storing, plus with other camping gear you have an argument for a legitimate activity needing it.

 

Me personally, my buscraft/survival knife is HUGE :) My wife and her family got me a Becker 21 Reinhardt-Becker Kukri. I made a MOLLE compatible sheath for it so I can put it on the outside of my ALICE and other packs.

 

And just like firearms, you need to be careful where you bring ANY type of knife, sheath or folding. Until NC changed the laws stating sub-jurisdictions could not add to the knife laws, there were some areas in the state I could not bring my Gerber Gator because the blade length was to long.

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Good discussion above.  Exactly right.

 

Another reason some camps or SMs put an age limit, many give up.  Most first years don't complete shotgun.  Their smaller size makes the challenge much more difficult.  And if you don't do it right, it definitely can hurt.  We want younger scouts to have positive experiences and to walk away with the MB if possible.  

 

So age 14 is listed as a restriction, but it's more of a guide to avoid a bad experience.

 

Personally, I hate when groups add restrictions.  I see it all the time.  How about just a guidance note saying it's harder for first years and a friendly suggestion for scouts to hold off for a year or two.  

Edited by fred johnson

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Wikipedia says: "A ballistic knife is a knife with a detachable blade that can be ejected to a distance of several yards by pressing a trigger or operating a lever or switch on the handle."  According to the article, the LEAST powerful type (spring-propelled) is capable of firing the blade about 16 feet at 39 mph.  They also come in air-, gas- and explosive-propelled.  And here's one now, thanks to the same site:

 

250px-Ballistic_knife-01.jpg
 
I can kind of understand why people would be skittish about these things.
 
P.S.:  If I'm calculating this right, 39 mph is 57.2 feet per second.  So if it is only going 16 feet, it is getting there pretty quickly.

 

 

Now I REALLY want one of these! ;) 

 

But back on topic, I recently had to turn away some scouts from climbing because the camp issued a rule that they had to be 13 or older. My training says that Boy Scouts may climb on natural rock but the camp issued a rule. I wasn't happy about it but it wasn't my decision.  

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Wow you guys are great from guns to sheath knives! I can understand why a smaller younger scout would be discouraged. But I think with proper training (which our Merit badge counselor BEAR was great) and parent approval they should be given a shot and not told no. I think kids should be allowed to shoot a couple then depending how they feel they know whether or not they will be able to try the merit badge or not. My son was told he couldn't even try to shoot a shotgun until 14. Because I was there I went over beyond our scoutmasters instructions and let my son try. I know shouldn't have. Now go forward 2 months later, we have found a sport that my son loves. He is learning from the best instructors and had the privilege to shoot and learn with some of the best in the world. Amazing things that boys scouts opens us up to. Forever grateful to Bear at Makualla camp in Oregon.

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