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Contact Etiquette for Leaders

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If these kids are asked to track their own homework and due dates in school, interact with teachers, arrange appointments with them or track after school activities, respond to teacher inquiries, why should Scouts be any different.

 

Sometimes parents protect these kids too much.

 

I do think limiting contact modes is a bit much.

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What is the etiquette for a scout contacting a MB Counselor or the fly-fishing speaker for the September meeting?

 

Barry

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Not sure about etiquette, but someone else should be "on the line" or copied on the emails per YPT to prevent one-on-one communication.

 

In theory, if you ask if someone else is on the line and the answer is "no," you politely hand up.  

 

Not sure how you unread the one-on-one email. 0___0

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I would think in the interests of YP, electronic (email/text) communications would actually be preferrable, as they are recorded communications that can be referred to later if need be. 

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The only scout needing to call the scoutmaster should be the SPL ;-)

 

I disagree.  In our troop ...

  • Youth run the program and activities.
  • Individuals run their own advancement. 

As such, scouts need to talk to the scoutmaster about blue cards, scoutmaster conferences and other advancement related topics.  

  • Upvote 1

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Is the SM military by chance?  This sounds vaguely like military etiquette.  You never call a superior and leave a message for them to call back.  It's up to you to make contact, not to put the monkey on their back.  I was a civilian in a military organization and a young enlisted person [taught me this.

 

That's all well and good, but he is operating in a civilian context. The scouts surely are not military. And in the civilian world, you call people back when they call you and leave a message.

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Maybe this SM has a lot going on and needs to manage it in a way that works for him.  Who knows, but I think using the term etiquette to title this post is incorrect.  Preference would have been the better word.

 

Some people prefer phone calls to texts, some snail mail to e-mail.  We all have our prefrences.

 

For me, it depends.  I like texts a little more than calls.  But most who call me know that if your number isn't in my phone, I don't answer, so if you want a call back you have to leave a message.  My preferred method overall is e-mail though, send me an e-mail and I'm good.

 

That being said, I like to use whatever the scouts are using, for the most part, but there are those who don't. 

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The only scout needing to call the scoutmaster should be the SPL ;-)

 

 

I disagree.  In our troop ...

  • Youth run the program and activities.
  • Individuals run their own advancement. 

As such, scouts need to talk to the scoutmaster about blue cards, scoutmaster conferences and other advancement related topics.  

 

but for advancement (or anything else really), shouldn't he be contacting his PL?

    (or I suppose in some cases perhaps you could argue to include the "instructor" or "Troop Guide" if you you used either of those, or maybe another more senior scout)

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but for advancement (or anything else really), shouldn't he be contacting his PL?

    (or I suppose in some cases perhaps you could argue to include the "instructor" or "Troop Guide" if you you used either of those, or maybe another more senior scout)

 

It depends on your interpretation of "scout run".  My troop interprets it as the youth run the meetings, activities and events.  They lay out the schedule and resources.  They take responsibility.  

 

We view "advancement" as mostly outside "scout run".  Advancement is an individual drive and choice.  The troop program should be structured to include plenty of opportunities to learn and fulfill requirements.  Beyond that, it's up to the scout.  

 

I've been in troops that have youth teach and sign off on requirements.  I like and dislike it at the same time.  Like anything, pros and cons.  For scoutmaster conference, blue cards and other related advancement topics, it's the scoutmaster (or those assigned that role).

 

I'd like to see guidance in the Troop Leader Guidebook and the Scout Handbook that teaches how it should happen.

Edited by fred johnson

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At a recent troop meeting, the SM announced that scouts are expected to call him (not email or text). If he does not answer, he is not expected to return their call -- they are expected to keep calling until he answers.

 

At the same meeting, our advancement chair asked that scouts call her home phone (not cell) and leave a voicemail including a phone number.

Hmmm. SM sounds like he is saying my time is important, yours isn't.

 

Why would a scout be calling an advancement chair? I see no reason for that.

 

As for how we do things.

Call - have someone else on the line, if you leave a message I'll call back as soon as I can, with someone else on the line with me

Text - group text only - no one on one

Email - cc someone else.

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Why would a Scout communicate with an troop committee advancement chair?

 

If the advancement chair keeps advancement records, and many do, or was a source on advancement requirements, which she may be, the Scout might be checking up on something>  Or the Scout might be asking about scheduling a Board of Review.  And it would be another exercise in contacting an adult.

 

Why not?

 

It is the CO, through the unit committee, that is charged with seeing that BSA program is being furnished,

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If the advancement chair keeps advancement records, and many do, or was a source on advancement requirements, which she may be, the Scout might be checking up on something>  Or the Scout might be asking about scheduling a Board of Review.  And it would be another exercise in contacting an adult.

 

True, particularly for the Scribe, who should be helping maintain advancement records, and Librarian who should be maintaining the requirements via the library.

 

It is the CO, through the unit committee, that is charged with seeing that BSA program is being furnished,

 

While I agree, I would argue that should be done through the CC to the SM, who is responsible for the program.

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