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RichardB

What are your favorite Scouting Myths Safety / Risk Management?

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To file away for when each of us are old gentleman or ladies ;) ...

... I put the old gentleman "teaching" the course into conniptions because I told the class at one point about the BSA's new neckerchief policy, and for one reason or another, he did NOT like it.....

 

To be fair, the policy is quite new. It is a response to the small percentage of older scouts who've attended World Jamborees or who have had spent some time with scouts from around the world. As you can tell in Bryan's blog, it is not without its detractors.

 

In fact, we were discussing uniforming at our last round-table boy scout breakout, and I didn't bring the neckerchief exception up. Until it is the dress code for mid-day activities at summer camp, council service projects, etc ... leaders won't be convinced there is any merit to it.

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Both very fair comments that I needed to hear, and I am thankful to you both for helping me to understand his confusion and opposition. I hope I was clear enough to him about my belief that the uniform is one of the most powerful tools we have in Scouting for promoting our ideals and values. When I discussed it with the class, I didn't mean for it to be regarded as an "alternative" to the uniform - it was BALOO training after all, and the discussion stemmed from a Scouter asking whether or not Cub Scouts had to be in uniform all the time at every single activity. The gentleman's response was that the uniform "wasn't that important anyway," so they needn't worry about it. Being a staunch supporter of full and proper uniforming, but wanting to offer an acceptable BSA solution other than "uniforms don't matter anyway," I brought up the neckerchiefs.

 

I was careful though to be as polite as possible of course; I do realize that when boys who are Wolf Scouts today are in college, I will be middle-aged myself, and I hope then I will remember this experience when some kid tries to help ME understand a policy change that I have a difficult time accepting myself, lol. Thank you both for your insights and perspective. I always appreciate it.  :-)

Edited by The Latin Scot

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Neckerchiefs....   Let's remember that the necker was ORIGINALLY intended to be an emergency tool, that the Scout wearing it (in uniform!)  was wearing it so he could whip it off and use it.  It only later became a purely piece of fashion, or "bling".   Superfluous to the modern Scout.   But considering the attitude of our international brothers, perhaps the first  idea is coming around again.

Necker as ID for a Scout....  

Necker as brotherhood trading item....

Necker as utilitarian item (warm neck, perhaps arm sling, sweat wiper?  )

 

In my yoooth, the Troop designed it’s own neckerchief. 36 inches on the side, bright red with a 4″ custom patch in the corner that proclaimed “Always On The GO!†They were used for first aid practice, hiking, camping, signal flags, “steal the bacon†games…
Mine is folded up nice in a plastic bag, except for when I take it out to show the present day Scouts in the Troop. It has holes in it, It is frayed on the edges. The patch is wrinkled, a lot.
Starting in December, I promote a small contest that I hold at the February CoH. I give prizes (Baskin -Robbins coupons for free milkshakes! Just ask’em for them!) for the creation of hand made woggles. Sometimes I get really neat creations, sometimes rolls of duct tape. If it looks like I might get a good selection, I ask an “independent†judge to attend (art teacher, pro wood carver) . During the CoH, I am allowed to do a show and tell about neckers and woggles. I read from an old Scout book about the “USES†of the necker: Bandage, dust mask, horse bridle, crowd control (tie a lot together, use the Scout Staff), sail boat emergency rigging….
I compare the BIG Troop necker of my day with the little necker the Troop used til last year ( a bigger, “stock†necker is now given out). . Photos show the red necker did reach down past the Scout’s belt. He grew into it.
In my collection, I have neckers and woggles “earned†(OA, Troop, Camporees, Wood Badge, Jamborees, Eagle…) and “collected†(Smokey Bear, Jamborees, Cub Scouts, “Troop One, Wilmington Delawareâ€) . Some Scouts OOO and AAAH at them , some ignore them. If I had attended a Jamboree, I would have been tempted to trade for my necker ( I guess I could have got another one), but the one I have in that plastic bag is important to me. I hope it will be important to my Scoutson.

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Even in Houston Cubs camp in weather colder than 40 on occasion. We were at 24F one morning at Webelos Woods. A whole camp full of Webelos and their parents at an event run by District. Not one word was said about sending everyone home. Weird.

24F?  That's T-shirt weathah up heah in New England! Ayuh. :)

Edited by frankpalazzi
  • Upvote 1

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One I hear all the time is the mixing up of "2 Deep Leadership" and "No 1 on 1"

 

Heard someone over the weekend say that you had to have 2 adults in each car with Scouts.

 

Hear the same thing about meeting - 2 adults must be at every meeting.

 

My older son's old Troop won't do a trip unless there are 4 adults available to go.

They don't want to stuck in any situation where 2 adults aren't present at all times.

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I have a new one! 

 

Youth may not drive other scouts. 

That one is mostly true.  

From the G2SS

"The drivers must be currently licensed and at least 18 years of age. Youth member exception: When traveling to and from an area, regional, or national Boy Scout activity or any Venturing event under the leadership of an adult (at least 21 years of age) tour leader, a youth member at least 16 years of age may be a driver, subject to the following conditions:

a. Six months’ driving experience as a licensed driver (time on a learner’s permit or equivalent is not to be counted) b. No record of accidents or moving violations c. Parental permission granted to the leader, driver, and riders

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That one is mostly true.  

From the G2SS

"The drivers must be currently licensed and at least 18 years of age. Youth member exception: When traveling to and from an area, regional, or national Boy Scout activity or any Venturing event under the leadership of an adult (at least 21 years of age) tour leader, a youth member at least 16 years of age may be a driver, subject to the following conditions:

a. Six months’ driving experience as a licensed driver (time on a learner’s permit or equivalent is not to be counted) b. No record of accidents or moving violations c. Parental permission granted to the leader, driver, and riders

say what???

do I have this right.....

   so under those specific criteria (6 mos experience, no accidents, etc..), a 16 year old scout can drive other scouts to an area, regional, or national event...... BUT that same scout cannot be a driver to a unit event????

 

what is an "area event" anyway?

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what is an "area event" anyway?

 

example - area conclave, OA meeting, board.  The Area is a subset of the Region.  Council, Area, Region is hierarchy.   

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example - area conclave, OA meeting, board.  The Area is a subset of the Region.  Council, Area, Region is hierarchy.

I think that except for people involved in the OA, very few Scouters even know there is an "Area" in the organizational chart between Region and Council. I know it exists but have never seen any actual evidence of it as a Scouter (not counting this forum.) I have known a couple of people who wore the "Regional Committee" committee patch but have never seen anyone wearing Area insignia. I wonder if the BSA could merge the Areas into the Regions and save some money, without sacrificing whatever it is that they do.  Of course, some people in this forum would be happy to do away with National and/or councils as well.   :)

Edited by NJCubScouter

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I think that except for people involved in the OA, very few Scouters even know there is an "Area" in the organizational chart between Region and Council. I know it exists but have never seen any actual evidence of it as a Scouter (not counting this forum.) I have known a couple of people who wore the "Regional Committee" committee patch but have never seen anyone wearing Area insignia. I wonder if the BSA could merge the Areas into the Regions and save some money, without sacrificing whatever it is that they do.  Of course, some people in this forum would be happy to do away with National and/or councils as well.   :)

Venturers organize and participate in some activities along the lines of Areas. But, given their small numbers, I guess that makes your point.

Edited by qwazse

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Just trying to get this back on track. I think @@blw2 was not so interested in the fact that there are Areas so much as the absurdity of saying a 16 year old is allowed to drive several hours to some events but not one hour to a unit event.

 

BTW, blw2, we apply those rules to our unit events.

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Just trying to get this back on track. I think @@blw2 was not so interested in the fact that there are Areas so much as the absurdity of saying a 16 year old is allowed to drive several hours to some events but not one hour to a unit event.

 

BTW, blw2, we apply those rules to our unit events.

exactly!

or even they can drive 10 minutes to one event but not 10 minutes to another event.

 

IMHO, if they are licensed by the state, they should be able to drive under whatever limitations or privileges apply to said license.  I get that a carload of teenagers might be more apt to horse around, but that is another issue.

 

Hey, i wonder what they would say about a flight permit for an outing to be piloted by a freshly minted 17 year old FAA licensed private pilot scout?

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