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meyerc13

Fundraising - Kids or Adults?

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I actually think it was the opposite. Soldiers in the royal army had to work their ticket back home from wherever in the empire they were deployed, So, the notion of "working to pay his own way" was part of the scouting mystique -- as opposed to an officer getting a wire transfer from his countess grandma for services to the crown. (Pardon my extreme revisionist history.)

 

So, boys had that sense of rugged individualism from early on in scouting. When things like Jamborees and other big-ticket adventures for youth came on the horizon, a balance was struck between an elite boy garnering his own funds and relying on his family, the troop, etc... for the larger portion of expenses.

maybe so, but that has nothing to do with being thrifty.

Responsible perhaps, but thrifty....or any other point in the law.... not so much.

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I can't quote chapter and verse, but I believe soliciting cash donations without some good or service attached is a no go under the rules for unit fundraising.  

 

You can accept them when offered.  So if instead of buying popcorn I just give a $10 check to every kid who shows up at my house that's OK, likewise if someone tells you to keep the change, you can accept it as a donation.

 

Here it is, from the Fiscal Policies and Procedures for BSA Units FAQ:

We can’t solicit gifts for our unit?

No. Simply put, units are not permitted to solicit any gifts. Both the Charter and Bylaws and the

Rules and Regulations of the BSA make this very clear; only local councils may solicit individuals,

corporations, United Ways, or foundations for gifts in support of Scouting. Units, unit leaders, and

youth members may not solicit gifts in the name of Scouting or in support of unit needs and

activities (except in unusual circumstances where the unit has received permission to do so from

the local council). Units are also prohibited from soliciting gifts on their websites.

Does that mean people can’t make gifts to our troop?

Units are not supposed to solicit gifts, but they can receive gifts. Anyone can contribute to a Scout

pack, troop, or unit—and many donors don’t need or care about charitable deductions. Obviously,

defining a “solicited gift†is not always easy. But we rely on our unit leaders to set good examples

and honor the intent and spirit of these important guidelines. We know it’s hard to stop people from

being generous, especially toward Scouting.

 

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Here it is, from the Fiscal Policies and Procedures for BSA Units FAQ:

 

 Thank you!!

 

When we do show and sells we get more donations than sales...... all donations go into a fund that purchases popcorn to send to the military.

Edited by andysmom

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I would point out that many of my older scouts are already working to save up some money for their college education.

 

I worked my way through college, paying my own way.  I think this was a good experience, teaching me responsibility and character.

 

But this was a long time ago.  Back then, it was possible for a young man to work his way through college.  College costs have gone up astronomically.  The entry level positions that allowed me to pay for my education wouldn't even come close to covering the costs of college today.

 

I think the same is true of scouting.  The costs of scouting have increased at a much faster rate than what today's kids can be reasonably expected to earn for themselves.

 

This is particularly true when the boy is already trying to save up for college.

 

I think quite a few 16 and 17 year old scouts drop out of scouting because they and their parents are budgeting for college.

Edited by David CO

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I would point out that many of my older scouts are already working to save up some money for their college education.

 

I worked my way through college, paying my own way.  I think this was a good experience, teaching me responsibility and character.

 

But this was a long time ago.  Back then, it was possible for a young man to work his way through college.  College costs have gone up astronomically.  The entry level positions that allowed me to pay for my education wouldn't even come close to covering the costs of college today.

 

I think the same is true of scouting.  The costs of scouting have increased at a much faster rate than what today's kids can be reasonably expected to earn for themselves.

 

This is particularly true when the boy is already trying to save up for college.

 

I think quite a few 16 and 17 year old scouts drop out of scouting because they and their parents are budgeting for college.

It is very true that college-bound venturers have little time because they have to work harder to raise money for college. This is especially true of private school students whose parents pay tuition and local school taxes. (When I've said this in the past, I've been accused of being anti-private education or pro-voucher. Please do not take it as such. I am strictly talking about budgets and whose among families with similar income and living expenses will be necessarily tighter by the time college enrollment rolls around.)

 

My latest recruit is actually on a break from college, and now has a job and time, as well as savings, to put towards some things she missed in high school.

 

The education dept crisis is forcing a lot of life decisions that we have not seen in a long time. If it weren't for engineering co-ops (which effectively interrupt schooling for intermittent gainful employment), my kids would have a hard time justifying their expenses.

 

But, regarding this impact on scouting we need to keep in mind: Jamboree never attracted more than 3% of membership. I'm not sure about H/A bases, but I bet they never attracted more than 15% of membership. Part of the adventure is figuring out how much "backyard fun" you can have with meager earnings and a few pieces of cloth.

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 Part of the adventure is figuring out how much "backyard fun" you can have with meager earnings and a few pieces of cloth.

 

When I think of thrifty, I think of this.

 

Today the monthly camping trip is usually at least $30 a pop.  We use a formula of $5 per scout per meal plus overhead for fees & gas.  When my son shops, he never thinks about saving money.  It's mom who teaches him about smart shopping.  Her meals come in closer to $3 a person.

 

I'd almost rather he learn the lesson my wife teaches him than about fundraising.

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 Thank you!!

 

When we do show and sells we get more donations than sales...... all donations go into a fund that purchases popcorn to send to the military.

 

Seriously?! As former Popcorn Kernel, Treasurer, and veteran, I think that's a terrible idea! For one, some people do not wish to support the military and that is their right. When they are giving your Pack cash they wish your Pack to benefit from it. Also, some of us who give cash don't want Packs to lose 2/3 of the money to overhead. I know exactly what I am doing when I give cash and when I give $10 it is because I want the Pack to have $10 NOT $3 with Trail's End and the Council each taking their cut. 

 

We NEVER solicited donations, but when we got them they went right into the bank because that is what the donor intended and that is allowed by BSA policy.

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Seriously?! As former Popcorn Kernel, Treasurer, and veteran, I think that's a terrible idea! For one, some people do not wish to support the military and that is their right. When they are giving your Pack cash they wish your Pack to benefit from it. Also, some of us who give cash don't want Packs to lose 2/3 of the money to overhead. I know exactly what I am doing when I give cash and when I give $10 it is because I want the Pack to have $10 NOT $3 with Trail's End and the Council each taking their cut. 

 

We NEVER solicited donations, but when we got them they went right into the bank because that is what the donor intended and that is allowed by BSA policy.

I'm going to both agree and disagree with you.  First, I doubt there's anyone who would be generous enough to donate to scouts but actually object to sending some popcorn  to someone deployed overseas.  Further, one of the uses of funds raised by scouts is to do the good turns that scouts are known for, and that can include any number of projects --- snacks at service project, Blue & Gold banquet entertainment, or even working on care packages for anyone, from deployed soldiers to folks in a nursing home, to refugees.  So I don't think that the use of these funds for buying other popcorn is inappropriate.  But I do agree it is inefficient, the reason I give cash instead of buying product is precisely because I want the donation to be efficient.  You should feel free, and it is probably closer in keeping with the donor's wishes, to just drop those donations into the Pack or Troop general fund.

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Yah, hmmm...

 

I think I'm with @@Zaphod.  A person who gives a cash donation to a BSA unit is intendin' the donation to go to support that unit.  Turnin' around and givin' da entire donation to military popcorn (is there a chronic popcorn shortage in our armed forces?) is arguably violatin' the donor's intent.  Yeh have at least a moral obligation to disclose that's what yeh intend to do with the money, so the donor can make an informed decision on whether to give his/her hard-earned cash to send popcorn to the military.

 

I think yeh have to put it in the unit treasury.   If there's a unit project to do care packages for the military, then yeh can use treasury funds (and a portion of the donation) for that, though I reckon most units would fund-raise separately for the care package contents.   If you're representin' to the donor that they're giving to your unit for Scouting, then yeh are honor-bound to accept it and use it for Scoutin'.

 

Beavah

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While I applaud the intent, I too think they're perfectly fine to take all the donations and spend it on the program.  People give money to the scouts to give money to the scouts.  If I were a visitor to that unit, I'd tell the adults that don't need to feel pressure to turn over donations like that.  Sometimes these things happen because a well meaning adult has an idea like this and people don't want to argue against it.

 

But, if this is something the unit really wants to do - it's fine.  Part of the program is teaching the scouts how to make good choices.  If the scouts see that 10% (or whatever donations are) of Popcorn money is turned around and forwarded to the troops, there is value to that for the scouts.

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It is made clear to anyone who donates that the troop purchases popcorn for the overseas troops with any donation that we receive, it is told to anyone who says they just want to donate and we have a sign posted as well.  We have a military presence in our town and many of our scouts have friends and/or family who are service members.  Everyone seems happy to support both organizations and doing it with $5 is a better option for most than paying the $30 to $50 option for the military donation.  We have never had anyone, to my knowledge, request their donation back upon realizing what we do with donations.  We will have a new popcorn kernel next year (after 8 years) so perhaps that will be discussed, but for now it works for us.

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Even though this takes my thread even further off topic, I've got to side with Andysmom on this one.  Perhaps those of you with Troops are too far removed from the Cub Scout program to remember, but many Cub Scout Packs choose to use a prize program as part of their popcorn sale.  It's a big incentive for the boys to sell more popcorn.  In order for the boys to get credit to their prize goal, donations have to be recorded as 'military donation.'  I'm not sure why so many have a problem with this.  Over 1/3 of the money in our Council stays with the Pack.  About 1/3 goes to the Council, to help pay for District staff to help us and for our camp properties.  The remaining third is used to send that much popcorn to our Troops.  It's a win all around.

 

Our Pack was very upfront about this at our Popcorn sales.  Not only has it never resulted in someone complaining, on one occasion when my son was doing Show and Deliver it resulted in a customer deciding to change his $40 popcorn purchase into a $40 military donation instead.  He was still helping our Pack, but did it because he remembered receiving Scout popcorn when he was stationed in the Middle East.  He told my son, "Those guys will enjoy the popcorn more than me."  Doing this is a way to turn some 'no' responses into a $5 (or other amount) donation, 1/3 of which would go to our Pack, which is better than 1/3 of 'no thank you.'

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I don't mind council donations.  The council provides services that my pack & troop take advantage of.  I see my council donation as providing for scouting as a movement.  On top of that, I regularly benefit from having a district executive and I know those donations in part pay his salary.  I'm happy to contribute to that.  However, I know that others disagree with me on payments to council- which is fine too.

 

I'm also fine with the military donations myself.  The only point I had before was that a pack should not need to justify their fundraising by saying "a part will go to the troops."  If a unit feels that they need to do that, I would suggest that they don't need to do that.  That this particular unit wants to do it and made a deliberate choice to do that is fine by me. 

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