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JosephMD

Troop Court of Honor Last Night

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As the member of committee who focuses on advancement, the Court of Honor is the night where I get to see my efforts publicly recognized.  Of course, I'm still in the background, just watching as the SPL and the MC for the night do the announcing and awarding of merit badges, rank advancement cards, etc.  It is like getting a pat on the back that nobody else knows about. 

 

The scouts are still using the same old tired script they've been using since my son first joined.  I suppose at some point they will figure out that there are seven ranks and more than 121 merit badges.  Maybe I'll ask the SPL if he is still enjoying using the same outdated script.

 

The troop generally has three per year, January, May, & September, with September being the one where a lot of merit badges are awarded as it is the first following summer camp. 

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yeah, if you're like me you're finding being on the committee frustrating... at times.

We aren't in one of the key 3 positions that can really directly affect change..... and honestly need to be respectful of out boundries.

 

I just keep reminding myself in these situations that the scouts (and my son) are at least getting something out of the program, as long as those key folks aren't doing direct harm..... not always, but there are times like this.....

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As the member of committee who focuses on advancement, the Court of Honor is the night where I get to see my efforts publicly recognized.  Of course, I'm still in the background, just watching as the SPL and the MC for the night do the announcing and awarding of merit badges, rank advancement cards, etc.  It is like getting a pat on the back that nobody else knows about. 

 

If done properly, this is how ALL adult roles should be in Scouting.

 

I cannot tell if you are upset about this or happy about this development, but if I were you I'd be tickled that the boys are running the show and your role got pulled off without knowing you were even involved. If you are one of the Key 3 and you can do that it is even more of an impressive feat.

 

yeah, if you're like me you're finding being on the committee frustrating... at times.

We aren't in one of the key 3 positions that can really directly affect change..... and honestly need to be respectful of out boundries.

 

I just keep reminding myself in these situations that the scouts (and my son) are at least getting something out of the program, as long as those key folks aren't doing direct harm..... not always, but there are times like this.....

 

I will respectfully disagree with you. I think most, if not all, adult roles can have a huge impact on the boys and the program. We have one ASM who does not do much, ever. BUT, his one thing is water safety. Due to his experience he is nuts on the subject and teach various craft techniques and safety, runs the annual swim test, is around whenever water sports are in play. 

 

We have several adults like this; absent 90% of the time but when the one thing comes up that they are great at they step up and run the heck out of it.

 

I am sure you both are doing a great job. Just keep doing what you are doing and look for other ways to help the Scouts when you can and time allows. Don't burn yourself out!! ;)

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As the member of committee who focuses on advancement, the Court of Honor is the night where I get to see my efforts publicly recognized.  Of course, I'm still in the background, just watching as the SPL and the MC for the night do the announcing and awarding of merit badges, rank advancement cards, etc.  It is like getting a pat on the back that nobody else knows about. 

 

 

You "took care of your boys" that's what leadership is all about.  The boys aren't stupid, they'll figure it out over time and the pats will be more obvious.

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I will respectfully disagree with you. I think most, if not all, adult roles can have a huge impact on the boys and the program. We have one ASM who does not do much, ever. BUT, his one thing is water safety. Due to his experience he is nuts on the subject and teach various craft techniques and safety, runs the annual swim test, is around whenever water sports are in play. .....

Sure we have impact and can even do a tremendous good.  

 

but what I am getting at is the major change....

I as a "new guy" and just a committee member, cannot come in and start telling the SM to stop talking, for example..... when it's clear that he should go over there, grab a cup of coffee, and let the scouts do their thing....

 

There is little if anything I can do directly to affect significant change in the unit's program.

 

It's really only the folks in the roles of SM, CC, or perhaps COR that really have the authority of position to do that sort of thing.

 

I can look for opportunities to respectfully hint and suggest every now and then, but it would never fly for someone like me to just hit the ground running to FIX the program.

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Sure we have impact and can even do a tremendous good.  

 

but what I am getting at is the major change....

I as a "new guy" and just a committee member, cannot come in and start telling the SM to stop talking, for example..... when it's clear that he should go over there, grab a cup of coffee, and let the scouts do their thing....

 

There is little if anything I can do directly to affect significant change in the unit's program.

 

It's really only the folks in the roles of SM, CC, or perhaps COR that really have the authority of position to do that sort of thing.

 

I can look for opportunities to respectfully hint and suggest every now and then, but it would never fly for someone like me to just hit the ground running to FIX the program.

 

I hear you. I was in the same boat when I started.

 

I met with the SM and asked him what his objective was for the unit. He was a helluva guy but was never a Scout, so there were aspects of "traditional" scouting he never employed (e.g., JASM, troop level training, etc.). We would chat time and again, and I'd ask him if I could offer suggestions and help in various areas (training of the instructors, service projects, etc.).

 

Eventually he asked me to take over. ROFL, I talked myself in to that one. ;) He was looking to step down anyway and he said all my ideas solidified it in his mind that I was the guy to take over. That was MANY years ago. Now *I* am looking for a replacement...and keep encouraging guys to give me their ideas. The guy (or gal) with the best ideas will get the baton. ;)

Edited by Krampus
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First: boys like tradition and structure. It helps them get through tedious ceremonies quickly.

So, they will pretty much imitate what they see in adults -- with shorter speeches.

It takes a little nudging to have the creative boys add a little creativity in an awards ceremony.

Edited by qwazse

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I hear you. I was in the same boat when I started.

 

I met with the SM and asked him what his objective was for the unit. He was a helluva guy but was never a Scout, so there were aspects of "traditional" scouting he never employed (e.g., JASM, troop level training, etc.). We would chat time and again, and I'd ask him if I could offer suggestions and help in various areas (training of the instructors, service projects, etc.).

 

Eventually he asked me to take over. ROFL, I talked myself in to that one. ;) He was looking to step down anyway and he said all my ideas solidified it in his mind that I was the guy to take over. That was MANY years ago. Now *I* am looking for a replacement...and keep encouraging guys to give me their ideas. The guy (or gal) with the best ideas will get the baton. ;)

and a key point is that you are "encouraging"... i think that is great!

 

Hopefully you'll find that #2 soon, so you'll have lots of time to mentor before you've had enough  

 

I'm only just curious

How many years have you been at it?

and why is it that you are planning your exit?

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I'm only just curious

How many years have you been at it?

and why is it that you are planning your exit?

Twelve years. I want to step down for a few reasons. First, in our unit we usually have a new SM every 4-5 years or so. That's pretty much a tradition where I live. It keeps units fresh and doesn't allow them to stagnate under one person. Second, I really want to focus on a high adventure program. We've got a very stable unit with a nice pipeline of incoming scouts. I want to focus on adult training and doing more for the older scouts. Mine is about to age out so the time is right to pass the baton.

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I will offer a counter.  Our Troop has 4 CoH a year (once a quarter)  Each one was expected to be different, and more elaborate, than the previous--which also mostly meant the parents of the assigned MC team was on the hook for way too much planning and execution. The boys were running out of ideas and locations and the parents were dreading when it was their boys turn.  Plus, our troop has generally tied it to the Comm badge (the MC's are doing the planning etc) and were spending more time on party planning (or getting park/community rec center permits) than actually communicating or working on public speaking.  I mean, the CoH is important but it isn't a royal wedding. 

 

Me and another parent, working with the SPL, got the troop to dial it down a notch and go back to making it about the boys and their advancements.   make the whole thing a little more "off the shelf" with a continuity binder so each successive team could already have a script which they could tweak as opposed to reinventing an ever more elaborate wheel (which in reality, is how the real world deals with repeating ceremonies).  Now, the boys can and do plan/run the whole show w/ little adult help.  Yes, each CoH is now very similar to the one before it but they happen w/in a reasonable time, the boys have fun and definetly learn about planning/executing an event and speaking before a group.

 

so IMO sounds like your boys are in a good place even if it is a little boring for the adults

Edited by wdfa89

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